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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 6, 2012
Married patients suffering from advanced lung cancer are likely to live longer after treatment than those who aren't hitched, according to research released today. The study by researchers at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center in Baltimore found that 33 percent of married patients with the most common type of stage III lung cancer were still alive three years after treatment. Only 10 percent of single patients were alive three years after undergoing chemotherapy and radiation.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
The legacy of Craig Willinger lives on with Hannah Smith at the 2014 World Cup. Smith, a 17-year-old high school soccer player from Murraysville, Pa., is in Brazil this week with her mother, Rori. She is the ninth honoree of a Baltimore-based foundation that sends young cancer patients and those who've survived the disease to soccer events around the world. Willinger, who grew up in Highlandtown, started the fund after he was diagnosed with an incurable form of cancer in 2007.
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HEALTH
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
When she heard Mercy Medical Center was going to celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day on Sunday, Megan Campbell knew she had to be there. The doctors and nurses at Mercy are, after all, the reason her two kids got to know their grandmother. The six years since her mother, Priscilla "Jo" Jones, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, Campbell said, have meant the world to her family. At the time, Campbell was pregnant, and she wasn't even sure Jones would see the birth of her first grandchild.
NEWS
February 9, 2014
As a lung cancer survivor who began smoking as a teenager because it was cool, I know the dangers of smoking first hand. I volunteer for the American Cancer Society as a recovery coach for lung and esophageal cancer patients. In addition, I work as a cancer registrar at MedStar Franklin Square Hospital and record tumor statistics for the many lung cancer diagnoses. I was diagnosed at age 49 with lung cancer and had both the fright and fight of my life. Luckily, I'm still here and can enjoy my beautiful little grandson, although, because I also have COPD as a result of my smoking, I have trouble keeping up with him. We've made a lot of progress against tobacco, but there is still work to do in Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1994
Being seen.That was the point yesterday at the Fifth Regiment Armory. Being seen walking and talking and smiling and enjoying a muggy Sunday afternoon in Baltimore.In other words, being alive.For two hours, the armory showcased defiance to a deadly disease. In Baltimore's first celebration of National Cancer Survivors Day, 1,000 survivors and their families assembled under red, white and blue bunting to munch on hot dogs, listen to music and thumb their noses at an illness too readily perceived as unconquerable.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | March 23, 2008
The terrifying discovery of the lump in their breasts. The surgery, the chemo, the radiation. All of that was behind them, maybe six months behind them, maybe five years behind them. But behind them. The women had taken up life where it had stopped, suddenly, with the devastating diagnosis of breast cancer. Taking care of husbands, kids, aging parents. Working, cooking, cleaning, volunteering. And everyone around them was so happy to see them back. But these women weren't back. Dr. Kathy J. Helzlsouer, breast cancer specialist at Mercy Medical Center, was hearing whispered complaints of fatigue.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
A band of some 40 cancer survivors wearing purple ribbon sashes gathered on the oval running track at Owings Mills High School yesterday evening to kick off the American Cancer Society's "Relay for Life."The group walked the first lap of an 18-hour fund-raiser for cancer research, in which teams of 10 to 15 were to walk or run around the track -- one person at a time -- until noon today.Georgene Batz, 59, of Reisterstown was among the survivors. As she rounded the first turn of the track, she said she was reminded of just how much cancer had changed her life.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
When Nancy Slaterbeck came out of anesthesia after her cancerous left breast was amputated at Johns Hopkins Hospital three weeks ago, all she wanted to do was sleep and get rid of the "unbearable" pain in her arm.But the main concern for some members of the recovery room staff seemed to be getting rid of her, the 51-year-old Towson woman told a Maryland Senate committee yesterday."
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | September 22, 1991
In January 1984, Hodgkin's disease ripped like a cyclone into the lives of Edward Mehl, then 24, and his wife, Valerie, who was 22.Lymph cancer was a force that threatened the young couple's marriage, then bonded it tighter than before and changed the direction of Mrs. Mehl's career from banking to communications.The impact cancer had on the Mehls' lives after the disease retreated is typical of what many cancer survivors find. Coming eyeball to eyeball with mortality jolts some survivors and their spouses into a deeper realization of what is important in life.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | May 17, 1993
When Raymond Bencak came to John Hopkins Hospital for treatment of leukemia in 1989, he and his wife, Eleanor, spent the first week in a hotel room. It was a comfortless place to face the prospect of grueling treatment and possible death.So they jumped at the chance to move to Hope Lodge, a haven for cancer patients and their families on West Lexington Street. For more than three months, while Mr. Bencak underwent a bone marrow transplant and extensive follow-up treatment, he and his wife lived with others who were dealing with the ravages of disease and the side-effects of chemotherapy and radiation.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Mother and daughter Angela and Candi Watts were both diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. After a two-year battle, they are both disease-free, but the war continues. The new enemy is their waistlines. Scientists have discovered that excess weight not only raises the risks of getting cancer but the chances that cancer will return. Now, as medical studies seek to determine how much weight loss is needed for a better prognosis - and whether the fat-cancer link can be disrupted in other ways - patients are being encouraged to slim down.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
Editor: Fallston Presbyterian Church will be hosting a cancer support group on the first and third Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. The first session will meet on Oct. 17. The sessions will have a spiritual/faith based focus and will offer a structured segment, allowing time for group sharing. The support group will be open to those with a cancer diagnosis and anyone affected by their diagnosis. The group will be led by Joanne Fleming and Debbie Glenn, both cancer survivors, and Stephen Ministers.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Two years after Giuliana Rancic was diagnosed with breast cancer , the E! News anchor says she has "come to a really good place where it doesn't take over my life everyday. " Rancic, who grew up in Bethesda and was scheduled to visit Maryland Live! Casino last week in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, told CBS.com that she was not as "sad or rattled" about the diagnosis now and was focused on "empowering other women" to seek testing and treatment. The television star discovered she had breast cancer while undergoing in vitro fertilization treatments two years ago. Since then, she and husband Bill Rancic have welcomed a son born to a surrogate mother.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | September 11, 2013
Ivelisse Page is on a mission. In 2011, Page launched Believe Big, a nonprofit foundation that helps cancer patients and their families through this traumatic, life-changing diagnosis. Based on her own experience as a colon cancer survivor, Page aims to educate the cancer community about the importance of combining conventional and complementary approaches to treatment. To that end, Believe Big is the primary backer of a clinical trial of mistletoe extract, an alternative therapy Page underwent, slated to begin at Johns Hopkins Medicine's Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center within the next six months.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
Fifty-two teachers and students at Dulaney High School accepted the challenge initiated by physical education teachers Kellie Fialcowitz and Jessica Szymanski to join them in donating eight inches of hair to Pantene Beautiful Lengths. Pantene Beautiful Lengths was the first company and is the largest national movement to create quality, real-hair wigs from donated hair. Wigs are then offered free to women affected by hair loss from cancer. As stated on the Pantene website, "To us, it's hair, but to women with cancer, it's hope.
NEWS
By Dan Singer | May 21, 2013
Nancy Becraft has a T-shirt from each year Laurel has held a Relay for Life, and has witnessed the growth of the event since the first relay in 1999. "We only started out with about 11 teams," Becraft said. This year there are 40 teams, and counting. The American Cancer Society's Relay for Life is a summer fundraising and awareness event organized in thousands of communities across the country. Participants, many of whom are cancer survivors and their families or friends, form teams and spend the evening walking laps around a track and enjoying planned entertainment.
NEWS
By Carole McShane and Carole McShane,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2004
Doug Ulman was a sophomore at Brown University when he was diagnosed with cancer in 1996. His mother looked for a support group for people his age, but the only ones she could find were for young children and older adults. So Ulman, a Howard County native, and his family launched a support program for cancer survivors in the 15-to-35 age group. Since then, the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults, in its seventh year, has gained national recognition for its wide-ranging programs, including an information-exchange network, support groups around the country, a documentary film and a course for pre-med students at Brown.
SPORTS
Staff report | September 30, 2011
Country music superstar Martina McBride will sing the national anthem before Sunday's Ravens-Jets nationally televised game and she will be joined by breast cancer survivors and those undergoing treatment. It's part of the Ravens' effort to help promote Breast Cancer Awareness Month. McBride's new single, “I'm Gonna Love You Through It,” offers hope and inspiration to those who have been affected by breast cancer, according to the team.  Ravens staff, family members and volunteers from the American Cancer Society will distribute 40,000 pink ribbons to fans as they enter the stadium Sunday.
EXPLORE
May 6, 2013
On April 19, psychology major Kaitlin Ames of Churchville participated in Stevenson University's Relay for Life Event. More than $38,000 was raised to support the American Cancer Society. More than 500 Stevenson University community members gathered together in the Owings Mills Gymnasium to participate in the American Cancer Society's Relay For Life, a 12-hour overnight event, symbolizing a night in the life of someone fighting cancer, a disease that never sleeps. Relay teams made up of friends, family, classmates, clubs and local businesses raised funds throughout the year and at the event to support American Cancer Society programs in cancer research, education, advocacy and patient services.
NEWS
By Raffi Joe Wartanian | April 9, 2013
- A lazy Sunday morning. Arising later than usual. A long week of work in the books, a promising week ahead. Now living in Armenia, I correspond regularly with colleagues, friends and family back home in the States. Birds chirp as I check some emails and enter the social media labyrinth. And there I found them: farewell messages written to my friend, Anne Smedinghoff, 25, praising her brilliance, grace and kindness. She was delivering a truck full of books to schoolchildren when it happened.
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