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Cancer Risk

NEWS
May 21, 2006
Annapolis Navy instructor files complaint A Naval Academy instructor set to stand trial on allegations of sexual harassment has filed an equal opportunity complaint with the Navy, citing "gender-based double standards" in how the school handles such claims. Lt. Bryan Black, who is accused of using crude and sexually explicit language in front of a mixed group of midshipmen last summer, wrote a detailed account of "off color, wholly inappropriate remarks" made from the lectern at an athletic association dinner May 9. In a written response to the claim, which was filed two days later, Vice Adm. Rodney P. Rempt thanked the oceanography professor for bringing this to the academy's attention and said an inquiry into the allegations "has been initiated."
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NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | May 18, 2006
A federal safety agency announced yesterday that it would fund a training program to analyze the cancer risk to firefighters exposed to toxins, an issue highlighted by a cluster of illnesses among Anne Arundel County firefighters who trained at an academy in Millersville in the 1970s. County officials said the effort by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health falls short of a request by U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski for a full-blown study. But they hope NIOSH's decision to launch a national Hazardous Substance Training Program - which will determine whether firefighters' exposure to toxins raises their long-term risk for some cancers, including brain cancer, and heart disease - in conjunction with the International Association of Fire Fighters will build momentum toward a cancer study that would include the Anne Arundel County fire service.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2006
The widely used genetic test for breast cancer risk can miss mutations that help cause the disease, according to a new study. The finding is likely to increase the pressure to develop more thorough testing methods. The test, which looks for mutations in genes called BRCA1 and BRCA2, missed them in about 12 percent of breast cancer patients from families with multiple cases of breast or ovarian cancer, according to the study's authors at the University of Washington. Experts said the chances of such false negative results were much smaller for women who were not from such high-risk families, so that most women who tested negative had little cause for concern.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
Next year, people living near nuclear power plants in Maryland and Pennsylvania will be offered pills they can take after a radioactive disaster to reduce their risk of developing cancer, according to federal officials. As part of a national program that is running years behind schedule, potassium iodide pills will be available to residents living 10 to 20 miles from the Calvert Cliffs plant in Southern Maryland and the Peach Bottom plant in Pennsylvania, officials said. Potassium iodide can help prevent thyroid cancer after a nuclear accident that releases radioactive dust into the air, as happened in Chernobyl in 1986, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
July 31, 2005
Juvenile center being investigated The U.S. Justice Department has launched an investigation into claims of mistreatment of youths, inadequate staffing and other problems at the state-run Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center, state officials confirmed. Third of bay called `dead zone' More than a third of the Chesapeake Bay was found to be a low-oxygen "dead zone" during monitoring this month, meaning the nation's largest estuary is on pace to have one of its most unhealthy summers on record.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
NATIONAL Highway, transit proposal A massive $286 billion plan for the nation's highways and transit systems neared final approval in the House last night, giving lawmakers something to brag about to constituents as they prepared to head home for Congress' monthlong summer vacation. [Page 1a] NASA shuttle mission NASA officials said yesterday that they were confident that Discovery had weathered its launch without major damage and will likely be able to return without a problem. [Page 3a]
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 21, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - A breast biopsy that comes back benign is reassuring to most women, but about a third are at significantly higher risk of breast cancer and need to discuss their options, a new study concludes. Those options include taking tamoxifen, undergoing genetic testing and supplementing regular mammography with breast MRIs. "There are different categories of benign biopsies, and they convey different risks," said Mayo Clinic oncologist Lynn Hartmann, who led the study published in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | May 26, 2005
Statins, the popular medications used to control cholesterol and stave off heart attacks, appear to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, researchers are to report today. The finding by researchers at the University of Michigan is part of a growing number of studies that are pinpointing new roles for the most widely prescribed class of drugs in the United States. Globally, statins, which include Zocor, Lipitor, Crestor and Pravachol, account for an estimated $20 billion in annual sales.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | July 7, 2004
People who drank about two 8-ounce glasses of milk a day had a 15 percent reduction in risk of getting colorectal cancer, according to a study that seems to redeem the benefits of a much maligned beverage. The new analysis from researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston comes as science continues to search for foods that may play a role in health and disease. Milk, in recent years, has been implicated as a trigger of other forms of cancer.
NEWS
July 6, 2004
THERE ARE Stetsons and safaris, straw skimmers and Panama porkpies. In a pinch, a plain old baseball cap will do nicely. Men's summer hats are making a comeback, according to the fashionable among us, and the resurgence comes none too soon. Forget being a fashion victim; the man without headgear faces far more serious consequences. Recent studies show men over 40 lead women in skin cancer diagnoses by as much as a 2-to-1 margin. Their propensity to go through summer bare-headed is one of the reasons for this.
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