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NEWS
May 20, 2012
It is irresponsible to claim, as the letter writer from Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) does, that eating meat is equivalent to smoking cigarettes ("Unhealthful foods kill more Americans every year than tobacco," May 13). In moderation, eating meat is perfectly fine. Studies of the supposed link between meat and cancer regularly find statistically weak or no associations. That's nowhere approaching the level of risk from cigarettes on lung cancer, which range upward of 20-fold.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Mother and daughter Angela and Candi Watts were both diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. After a two-year battle, they are both disease-free, but the war continues. The new enemy is their waistlines. Scientists have discovered that excess weight not only raises the risks of getting cancer but the chances that cancer will return. Now, as medical studies seek to determine how much weight loss is needed for a better prognosis - and whether the fat-cancer link can be disrupted in other ways - patients are being encouraged to slim down.
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EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 29, 2013
September marks Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and with prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States, the Harford County Health Department urges men to consider the facts about prostate cancer and the importance of a healthy prostate. In 2013, The American Cancer Society estimates that 4,880 men in Maryland will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 560 will die from it this year, while across the country, approximately 238,590 men will be diagnosed and 38,460 will die from this cancer this year.
HEALTH
By Shanti Lewis, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. The latest post is from Shanti Lewis, a registered dietitian. The benefits of eating less meat? Decreased cancer risk, improving heart health, helping the environment, weight management and financial benefits are just a few. Helping your diet It may seem obvious that exchanging a hamburger for a black bean burger is an easy way to cut fat and calories out of your meal.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 6, 1990
Women who live in Northern cities where towering buildings block what feeble winter sun there is may have a higher risk of breast cancer than women in sunny regions, a new study suggests.Researchers theorize that the women in these darker cities are not exposed to enough sunlight to allow their bodies to synthesize vitamin D.The study, by two University of California researchers, compared breast cancer death rates with the amount of solar radiation calculated to be striking the ground at 87 regions around the United States.
FEATURES
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 26, 1997
What a mother-to-be eats may affect her daughter's risk of breast cancer, new studies in rats indicate.Scientists from Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, fed pregnant rats diets high in a type of fat found in corn oil, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid. When the baby rats were born, the researchers fed them the standard lab rat chow.Compared with female offspring of rats that ate low-fat diets, the young rats entered puberty earlier, and their mammary glands had more of the types of cells that can turn cancerous later in life.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 15, 1994
A new study has found evidence that regular aspirin use reduces the risk of getting colorectal cancer, but researchers say there are still too many questions for them to recommend taking it regularly."
NEWS
By Newsday | June 15, 1994
Women in electrical jobs are 38 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than other working women, according to a new study that found an even higher death rate among female telephone installers, repairers and line workers."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 24, 2007
An abortion or miscarriage does not increase a woman's risk of breast cancer, according to results released yesterday from a decade-long study of more than 100,000 women. The study is the most recent in a series that have undercut a concern used by activists to dissuade women from having an abortion. "It's important for women to have the facts," said Dr. Karin B. Michaels of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, lead author of the study. An expert panel convened by the National Cancer Institute concluded in 2003 that there was no evidence to support a link between abortion and breast cancer, she said, "and our study is very much in line with that."
NEWS
By Newhouse News Service | March 30, 2008
About 45 million Americans are former smokers who, by quitting cigarettes, have dramatically cut their chances of getting heart disease, stroke and many cancers. But roughly a quarter will die from diseases caused by their old habit, experts say. New science is helping explain why cigarettes' threat doesn't vanish. National Cancer Institute researchers have examined cells from the lungs and lung tumors of 28 smokers, 26 ex-smokers and 20 people who never smoked but still developed lung cancer.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 29, 2013
September marks Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and with prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States, the Harford County Health Department urges men to consider the facts about prostate cancer and the importance of a healthy prostate. In 2013, The American Cancer Society estimates that 4,880 men in Maryland will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 560 will die from it this year, while across the country, approximately 238,590 men will be diagnosed and 38,460 will die from this cancer this year.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Got Golden? Known for their sunny, loving dispositions, Golden retrievers are among the most popular dogs chosen as family pets. Unfortunately, they're also among the most susceptible to cancer, which is the number-one killer of older retrievers. Because of this, the Morris Animal Foundation has launched the first wide-scale study into how and why dogs get cancer, and they're looking for 3,000 Golden retrievers to participate. Participation means agreeing to work with your vet to obtain annual exams and tests for your Golden retriever, allowing collection of any tumor samples, being willing to consider a post-mortem exam when your dog's life ends, and participating for the entire life of your dog -- 10 years or more.
HEALTH
By Ellen Loreck, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post. This week, Ellen Loreck, MS, RD, LDN;, weighs in on red meat. Picture this: You're out to dinner and there are juicy porterhouse steaks, sumptuous burgers, and tender ribs on the menu. Salivating yet? Then you worry that eating red meat, particularly fatty and processed meat, poses additional health risks. So, the question is: Should you eat these tasty meats and if so, how much? The warning A 2012 study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine concluded that an increased intake of red meat, both unprocessed and processed, was associated with a higher risk of death.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
Description: Two Johns Hopkins University scientists were awarded one of the National Cancer Institute's first grants intended to answer what it calls "provocative questions" in cancer research. They will receive more than $500,000 over a year as they study how and why infections can cause certain types of cancer and how cancer spreads. Other "provocative questions" focus on how obesity contributes to cancer risk, why some cancers can be cured by chemotherapy alone, and why some tumors become malignant after years of being benign.
NEWS
May 20, 2012
It is irresponsible to claim, as the letter writer from Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) does, that eating meat is equivalent to smoking cigarettes ("Unhealthful foods kill more Americans every year than tobacco," May 13). In moderation, eating meat is perfectly fine. Studies of the supposed link between meat and cancer regularly find statistically weak or no associations. That's nowhere approaching the level of risk from cigarettes on lung cancer, which range upward of 20-fold.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 28, 2011
Southern chef Paula Deen makes no apologies for her butter-filled unhealthy recipes. So it's no surprise that her cookbook tops the list of worst of the year in terms of health in a report by the Physicians Committee For Responsible Medicine. The group, that promotes healthy foods and eating, said Deen's and other unhealthy cookbooks encourage Americans to fill up on high-fat, meat-heavy meals. Jamie Oliver, the chef known for his aggressive campaign to make school lunches healthier, is also listed as one of the worst offenders.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | February 17, 1993
CHICAGO -- Two major studies involving more than 75,000 American men have found a statistical link between vasectomies and an increased risk of prostate cancer.But experts were quick to downplay the results yesterday, calling them "far too preliminary" for men to consider vasectomy reversal to reduce the risk. A vasectomy is sterilization by cutting the sperm canal.Nonetheless, while seeking to allay fears, the American UrologicalAssociation recommended that "many men who have had a vasectomy undergo medical procedures used for the early detection of prostate cancer."
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | July 7, 2004
People who drank about two 8-ounce glasses of milk a day had a 15 percent reduction in risk of getting colorectal cancer, according to a study that seems to redeem the benefits of a much maligned beverage. The new analysis from researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston comes as science continues to search for foods that may play a role in health and disease. Milk, in recent years, has been implicated as a trigger of other forms of cancer.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
The most comprehensive study ever on the link between organ donations and cancer is arming physicians with new data that could help make the procedures safer. Organ transplant patients get new kidneys, livers and lungs that save their lives, but they face a heightened risk of cancer because drugs that prevent the rejection of new organs also weaken the immune system. Most patients, like Jessica Protasio of Columbia, go through with transplants because the immediate risk of dying from failing organs outweighs the long-term risk of cancer.
NEWS
October 20, 2009
The link between ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer is so well documented, particularly the risk posed to young people, that banning teenagers from tanning salons ought to be a no-brainer. Yet only now is one Maryland jurisdiction finally moving in that direction. Once again, Howard County is shining a light on an important public health subject. Tanning salon beds produce UV radiation just as surely as the sun. While over-exposure to the sun may be inadvertent, there's nothing accidental about lying under tanning lamps.
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