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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 7, 2012
Update : Organizers said that people can now walk in to sign up for the study. If you'd like to register beforehand you can do so here:  www.CPS3baltimore.org  or www.CPS3Harford.org .  The American Cancer Society is looking for thousands of volunteers to participate in a long-term study that will look at the genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors that cause cancer. The organization is looking for 300,000 volunteers around the country, including more than 5,000 in Maryland, that they will follow for at least 20 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
After 13 years of experience in Maryland real estate, David Orso decided to use his skills to better equip those entering the housing market by writing a book. That this effort would also become a way to pay tribute to his wife was a heartbreaking coincidence. The book, "Step Inside: The Unfiltered Truth About Listing and Selling Your Home," reveals insider advice on finding the best agent, listing and pricing a home, roles of listing agents, and how to go from listed to sold smoothly.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 21, 2014
A doctor with the The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins has received one of 14 grants totaling $5 million to support research of pancreatic cancer. The $1 million grant, awarded by The  Pancreatic Cancer Action Network  and the  American Association for Cancer Research ,  was given to Dr. Dung T. Le. The grants are aimed at research that could help improve pancreatic cancer survival rates. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has a goal to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.
HEALTH
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
More than 1,000 people rode bicycles 150 miles - in the rain, for part of the way - this weekend to raise $2.6 million for cancer research at Johns Hopkins. The funds from the inaugural Ride to Conquer Cancer in Washington, D.C. on Saturday will support the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington and Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. Organizers said the money raised will allow researchers to personalize cancer treatment and screening methods for each patient.
NEWS
November 19, 2011
Thanks for calling attention to the fact that now is the time for our elected leaders to rise above political self-interest and make the difficult choices that are in our nation's best interest ("Supercommittee: Split the difference," Nov. 14). I agree that committee members must learn to compromise. But no matter which side of the aisle our elected officials are on, there is one thing that absolutely must not be compromised: Fighting cancer. Today, there are nearly 12 million cancer survivors.
EXPLORE
March 13, 2013
The Annual AMC Valentine Tea was held Friday, Feb. 15 at Tea by Two in Bel Air with a sellout crowd. Speaker Bob Rich from Saxon's Diamond Centers was entertaining and most informative as he shared samples of diamonds in various colors. Did you know that there are blue, yellow, brown and black diamonds? Oohs and aahs were heard throughout the tea room as samples were passed around for all to see. The Pandora Bracelet, donated by Saxon's, was a tantalizing auction item. The delicious menu for high tea was delicious and varied with lots of chocolate and fabulous teas all served in the charming atmosphere of classic table settings and decorations.
HEALTH
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
More than 1,000 people rode bicycles 150 miles - in the rain, for part of the way - this weekend to raise $2.6 million for cancer research at Johns Hopkins. The funds from the inaugural Ride to Conquer Cancer in Washington, D.C. on Saturday will support the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington and Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. Organizers said the money raised will allow researchers to personalize cancer treatment and screening methods for each patient.
FEATURES
By Sarah Tan, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
When Ian Hannafin's close friend died of cancer five years ago, he wanted to do something to help fight the disease so other families wouldn't have to suffer. The 15-year-old, who lives in Parkton, was only 10 when his close friend and neighbor, Joseph Messina, died of cancer in 2005. Joseph suffered from neuroblastoma and died at the age of 5, and after experiencing his death, Ian felt compelled to help. "When my friend died of cancer, I wanted to do something. I just couldn't stand watching their family suffer so much.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
Maryland, the state that suffers more cancer deaths than any other, has good reason to welcome the construction of a Comprehensive Cancer Center at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. The center, to be built on the original site of the Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, will bring together all the departments involved in treating patients with cancer, including surgical specialties as well as chemotherapy and radiation therapy.That in itself would bring care for cancer patients to a new level.
FEATURES
By David Zinman and David Zinman,Newsday wBB | July 9, 1991
More and more women across the nation are becoming vocal and active about breast cancer. Just like AIDS activists, women are forming their own advocacy groups to press state and federal governments to do more.The statistics, they argue, prove the need for action. More women get breast cancer than any other form of the disease. Since 1980, their numbers have grown by about 3 percent a year. In1940, one woman in 20 got breast cancer. Today, it is one in nine.Yet, the cause remains unknown. And for many patients, surgery, radiation and chemotherapy fall short of cure.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Toni L. Killefer, a former preschool teacher who mentored cancer patients and participated in breast cancer research, died Monday of metastatic breast cancer at her Stevenson home. She was 49. "I took care of Toni for a number of years, and she had her eyes wide open on this. She always knew what she was up against and she was very straightforward," said Dr. John H. Fetting III, a Johns Hopkins Hospital oncologist. "All she wanted to be was a mom and look out for her children with as little fuss about her illness, and just be able to manage.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The developer of Hunt Valley Towne Centre, Annapolis Towne Centre at Parole and other area shopping complexes has pledged a $15 million gift to create the Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute. The gift from Erwin L. Greenberg and his wife Stephanie Cooper Greenberg is part of $45 million, which includes gifts from Johns Hopkins University, federal funding and other philanthropic support, that will be used to develop the institute. The Greenberg gift, which is the largest designated bladder cancer research gift ever given to Hopkins, was made through the Erwin and Stephanie Greenberg Foundation, which gives to causes that supports issues of poverty, education, and medical research.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
At a lab on the edge of the Johns Hopkins University's East Baltimore medical campus, researchers grow tumors on mice so they can try and cure them. But one day, the cancer wouldn't grow. They tried again and again for months. Figuring there must be something different about this batch of mice, they finally discovered the rodents had been given a drug to prevent pinworm. Three years later, the common parasite treatment that retails for a few dollars a dose is being given to terminal brain cancer patients in a trial that could lead to more widespread use. Researchers who toiled for years for such a discovery said they still are investigating how it works.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Columbia resident Michael Osborne couldn't process the news when he was first diagnosed with a rare form of lung cancer back in May 2008. "It was horrifying," he said. "I called my wife, and we cried a lot. I was thinking 'You die of this disease, period.' " But after nearly a year of treatment, which included multiple surgeries and the removal of a portion of his right lung, Osborne, 57, has been cancer-free since March 2009. Now he is organizing the second annual Breathe Deep Columbia 5K Walk, to raise awareness of the disease, collect funds for lung cancer research and create a community of survivors and their loved ones.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 21, 2014
A doctor with the The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins has received one of 14 grants totaling $5 million to support research of pancreatic cancer. The $1 million grant, awarded by The  Pancreatic Cancer Action Network  and the  American Association for Cancer Research ,  was given to Dr. Dung T. Le. The grants are aimed at research that could help improve pancreatic cancer survival rates. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has a goal to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | February 25, 2014
The Johns Hopkins women will host the first Lacrosse Coaches vs. Cancer event Wednesday night when they meet Loyola in a nationally-televised 5 p.m. game at Homewood Field. A basketball event until now, Coaches vs. Cancer aims to raise awareness, funds and advocacy to combat the disease that has affected many basketball coaches, from the death of North Carolina State coach Jim Valvano in 1993 to the cancer diagnosis of North Carolina coach Sylvia Hatchell last year. It emerged as a collaboration between the National Association of Basketball Coaches and the American Cancer Society with events held at college and high school basketball games.
EXPLORE
April 6, 2012
At Tower Federal Credit Union's Laurel headquarters, March 22 was "Soup, Salad and Wear Jeans to Work Day," a fundraising effort that raised $2,200 for the Susan G. Komen Foundationand the American Cancer Society. Employees who donated $5 could wear jeans to work and received "Team for a Cure Casual Dress Day" stickers. During lunchtime, a variety of homemade soups, salads and desserts were available for purchase, and employees could also enter a raffle for a chance to win one of three handmade afghan wraps.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 6, 2014
Cancer patients at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center will now be able to access clinical trials and specialists offered in downtown Baltimore at the hospital system's flagship research center. St. Joseph, bought by the University of Maryland Medical System in 2012, has formally signed an affiliation agreement with Maryland's Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center , hospital officials said Feb. 6. At the time of the purchase, officials said they wanted to bring more top-tier services and specialists to the community hospital in Towson.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
The Frederick County sheriff's office identified three family members who were shot to death in an apparent murder-suicide Wednesday night in New Market but said they would wait until speaking with relatives before releasing more information. Benyam Asefa, 40; Barbara Giomarelli, 42; and Samuel Asefa, 3 months, were killed in the shooting in the 6800 block of Woods Court, deputies said. A 5-year-old girl escaped the home unharmed and ran to a neighbor's house, where a neighbor called 911. Deputies found a handgun at the scene.
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