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NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 2, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- House and Senate committees approved identical bills yesterday requiring Maryland hospitals and laboratories to report all newly diagnosed cancer cases to a central registry.The registry would be a cornerstone of the effort to learn why Maryland has the highest cancer death rate of any state in the nation.With copies of the same bill moving to the floors of the House and Senate, approval by the General Assembly is expected.Once signed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who requested the legislation, the new law would go into effect July 1.The bill is stronger than existing law, which does not require reporting by hospitals or laboratories.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Randy White had just buried a daughter, dead at 30 with a brain tumor. Now his other daughter had been diagnosed with growths in her abdomen. When doctors told White in 2009 that their conditions were likely caused by something in their environment, the Frederick native thought of Fort Detrick. His children had grown up near the Army base. Detrick was home to the nation's biological weapons program from the 1940s through the 1960s. It remains a key center for medical research. "Anybody that lives in Frederick knows all the rumors," White says.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | August 5, 2008
A state auditor's finding that a private contractor tampered with the numbers in the Family Health Administration's cancer registry has cast a new spotlight on the disease registries used to identify and address emerging threats to public health. Experts in the field say the patient data in the nation's various cancer registries are vital to their efforts to track trends and focus research and public education. But they also complain that there are no comparable national registries for a long list of public health problems of growing concern in the United States.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | August 5, 2008
A state auditor's finding that a private contractor tampered with the numbers in the Family Health Administration's cancer registry has cast a new spotlight on the disease registries used to identify and address emerging threats to public health. Experts in the field say the patient data in the nation's various cancer registries are vital to their efforts to track trends and focus research and public education. But they also complain that there are no comparable national registries for a long list of public health problems of growing concern in the United States.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | January 23, 1991
Health officials who have been poring over the state's cancer statistics for the past few months said yesterday they believed that tobacco and alcohol use were the major reasons why Maryland led the nation in cancer death rates.At least 42 percent of Maryland's cancer deaths, including lung, pancreas, esophagus, bladder, pharynx, liver and larynx, are linked to either tobacco use, alcohol use or both, Dr. John Southard of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said yesterday. And the Maryland death rate for all of these cancers is higher than the U.S. average, he said.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | July 29, 2008
A state contractor tampered with Maryland's cancer registry, a database used by researchers to track the disease's impact, counting hundreds of patients as having cancer when they did not, according to a legislative audit released yesterday. The company, Macro International Inc., found in an internal investigation that data were deliberately altered between August 2004 and December of that year. The company fired the employee responsible for the cancer registry. State officials said that Macro employees apparently overreported the incidence of cancer to ensure that the database met standards set by a national certification association, which closely monitors registries to ensure that states have a complete count of cases.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 25, 1990
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Inside the white cinder-block-and-clapboard church with a red door, nearly 300 parishioners and visitors from this city's black community crowded into the blond oak pews and overflowed into the aisles, singing, shouting, clapping, stomping feet and shaking tambourines.It was Saturday evening at New Galilee Baptist Church, and the crowd had gathered for a service billed as "Gospelizing for Cancer Awareness."Clad in black tuxedo, orange tie, and orange cummerbund, with an orange handkerchief in his pocket, the Rev. William Wilmore Jr. pulled out all the stops at the organ.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1995
In its first attempt to decipher Maryland's high cancer death rate, the state health department has found that tobacco is a culprit without rivals.Health Secretary Martin P. Wasserman said yesterday that tobacco was a factor behind 41 percent of all cancer deaths in the state between 1987 and 1991.The leaf looms so large because it is the major cause of lung cancer -- which alone accounted for more than a quarter of all cancer deaths -- and is also implicated in malignancies of the pancreas, esophagus, bladder, throat and cervix.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg and Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
A study of Baltimore cancer rates shows that the inner-city neighborhood near Lexington Market has the highest rate in the city, followed by an industrial stretch south of the harbor that includes Wagner's Point and Curtis Bay. The area with the lowest cancer rate was Howard Park in far West Baltimore. Other areas that fared well were Lauraville in East Baltimore, Frankford in Northeast Baltimore and the adjoining neighborhoods of Hampden and Remington in North Baltimore. At first glance, experts who conducted the study said, there is no clear pattern of environmental factors or lifestyle -- such as smoking or diet -- that would explain why some neighborhoods are hit hard and others are not. While many health problems are linked to economic levels, the cancer study did not find a pattern of high rates in the poorer neighborhoods and low rates in wealthier areas.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | October 21, 1991
Some people rake leaves in the fall; others clean out th garage; this writer clears out a folder marked "Workplace Hints" and presents some today:NOTES & QUOTES: "The business you get counts, sure, but not as much as the business you hold." (Malcolm Forbes Sr.) . . . "Chronic grumblers are often concerned, valuable people who need their energies channeled into making things better. They want to be heard. Be sure to listen, overcome the urge to argue, ask many questions and negotiate a workable solution if there is one."
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | July 29, 2008
A state contractor tampered with Maryland's cancer registry, a database used by researchers to track the disease's impact, counting hundreds of patients as having cancer when they did not, according to a legislative audit released yesterday. The company, Macro International Inc., found in an internal investigation that data were deliberately altered between August 2004 and December of that year. The company fired the employee responsible for the cancer registry. State officials said that Macro employees apparently overreported the incidence of cancer to ensure that the database met standards set by a national certification association, which closely monitors registries to ensure that states have a complete count of cases.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg and Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
A study of Baltimore cancer rates shows that the inner-city neighborhood near Lexington Market has the highest rate in the city, followed by an industrial stretch south of the harbor that includes Wagner's Point and Curtis Bay. The area with the lowest cancer rate was Howard Park in far West Baltimore. Other areas that fared well were Lauraville in East Baltimore, Frankford in Northeast Baltimore and the adjoining neighborhoods of Hampden and Remington in North Baltimore. At first glance, experts who conducted the study said, there is no clear pattern of environmental factors or lifestyle -- such as smoking or diet -- that would explain why some neighborhoods are hit hard and others are not. While many health problems are linked to economic levels, the cancer study did not find a pattern of high rates in the poorer neighborhoods and low rates in wealthier areas.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1995
In its first attempt to decipher Maryland's high cancer death rate, the state health department has found that tobacco is a culprit without rivals.Health Secretary Martin P. Wasserman said yesterday that tobacco was a factor behind 41 percent of all cancer deaths in the state between 1987 and 1991.The leaf looms so large because it is the major cause of lung cancer -- which alone accounted for more than a quarter of all cancer deaths -- and is also implicated in malignancies of the pancreas, esophagus, bladder, throat and cervix.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | October 21, 1991
Some people rake leaves in the fall; others clean out th garage; this writer clears out a folder marked "Workplace Hints" and presents some today:NOTES & QUOTES: "The business you get counts, sure, but not as much as the business you hold." (Malcolm Forbes Sr.) . . . "Chronic grumblers are often concerned, valuable people who need their energies channeled into making things better. They want to be heard. Be sure to listen, overcome the urge to argue, ask many questions and negotiate a workable solution if there is one."
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 2, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- House and Senate committees approved identical bills yesterday requiring Maryland hospitals and laboratories to report all newly diagnosed cancer cases to a central registry.The registry would be a cornerstone of the effort to learn why Maryland has the highest cancer death rate of any state in the nation.With copies of the same bill moving to the floors of the House and Senate, approval by the General Assembly is expected.Once signed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who requested the legislation, the new law would go into effect July 1.The bill is stronger than existing law, which does not require reporting by hospitals or laboratories.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | January 23, 1991
Health officials who have been poring over the state's cancer statistics for the past few months said yesterday they believed that tobacco and alcohol use were the major reasons why Maryland led the nation in cancer death rates.At least 42 percent of Maryland's cancer deaths, including lung, pancreas, esophagus, bladder, pharynx, liver and larynx, are linked to either tobacco use, alcohol use or both, Dr. John Southard of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said yesterday. And the Maryland death rate for all of these cancers is higher than the U.S. average, he said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Randy White had just buried a daughter, dead at 30 with a brain tumor. Now his other daughter had been diagnosed with growths in her abdomen. When doctors told White in 2009 that their conditions were likely caused by something in their environment, the Frederick native thought of Fort Detrick. His children had grown up near the Army base. Detrick was home to the nation's biological weapons program from the 1940s through the 1960s. It remains a key center for medical research. "Anybody that lives in Frederick knows all the rumors," White says.
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
Neighbors of Fort Detrick were not diagnosed with cancer in greater numbers than the broader population of Frederick County during the period for which data are available, state health officials told the community Monday. But local activists said the state's analysis does not capture the history of cancer around the Army base because it does not take into account cases before 1992, when the state began compiling its cancer registry. Clifford Mitchell of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said cases recorded in the Maryland Cancer Registry from 1992-2008 within two miles of Fort Detrick showed no statistically significant increase in any type of cancer as compared to the rest of the county.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 25, 1990
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Inside the white cinder-block-and-clapboard church with a red door, nearly 300 parishioners and visitors from this city's black community crowded into the blond oak pews and overflowed into the aisles, singing, shouting, clapping, stomping feet and shaking tambourines.It was Saturday evening at New Galilee Baptist Church, and the crowd had gathered for a service billed as "Gospelizing for Cancer Awareness."Clad in black tuxedo, orange tie, and orange cummerbund, with an orange handkerchief in his pocket, the Rev. William Wilmore Jr. pulled out all the stops at the organ.
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