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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 9, 2012
The American Cancer Society is launched a major, long-term prevention study across the country and is looking for people in the Baltimore area to participate. The society says 12 million people have survived cancer and many more have avoided it. This study could provide the information to keep others healthy. The study, much like the one that initially linked tobacco to cancer, will look at other genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors that may play into a person's risk of getting or preventing the disease.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Mother and daughter Angela and Candi Watts were both diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. After a two-year battle, they are both disease-free, but the war continues. The new enemy is their waistlines. Scientists have discovered that excess weight not only raises the risks of getting cancer but the chances that cancer will return. Now, as medical studies seek to determine how much weight loss is needed for a better prognosis - and whether the fat-cancer link can be disrupted in other ways - patients are being encouraged to slim down.
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EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | October 29, 2011
When Nawal Qalbi enrolled in a belly dancing class at the Carroll County YMCA five years ago, she never dreamed she would find her calling. Qalbi discovered the ancient dance form offered not just exercise, but camaraderie. "I was curious, really," said Qalbi said about signing up for that first class. "I thought I would be going in and be one of the oldest. There were so many women of different shapes, sizes and age groups. "It was very refreshing to see such a mixture of women in this classroom, and everybody enjoying each other's company.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
Thanks to Judy Berman for her wonderful support of her husband, and advice to Howard County men and women, in "My personal prostate cancer month. " I am personally very close in experience to her husband. All I can conclude is that without the PSA test I would have gone on in peaceful ignorance only to die painfully at a relatively early age from prostate cancer. Mrs. Berman, bless her heart, however only tangentially addresses the problem brought on by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF.)
NEWS
By VICKI WELLFORD | May 3, 1994
The county Health Department is sponsoring a free program on women's health and cancer prevention from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. next Tuesday at the O'Malley Senior Center.The speaker will be Lois Levine, a registered nurse as well as breast and cervical cancer program coordinator at the Health Department.The program, part of the Health Department's "Learn to Live" cancer prevention campaign, is intended to inform women about the importance of regular checkups for breast and cervical cancer.
NEWS
By PEG ADAMARCZYK | April 2, 1993
The rites of spring are upon us again. Winter's hibernation has been replaced by Opening Day fever, the Easter Bunny, daylight-saving time and the sight of dimpled, droopy body parts that haven't seen the light of day since September.But it's never too late to start that long-delayed, healthier lifestyle.From 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. tomorrow, dietitians from the county Health Department's "Learn to Live" cancer prevention campaign will be at Lauer's Super Thrift on Edwin Raynor Boulevard promoting the benefits of a high-fiber diet.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | March 19, 1992
When his wife suggested he should take advantage of a free prostate cancer screening last September, Rupert Bradshaw objected that he had no symptoms."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2000
Maryland would spend millions of dollars to fight smoking-related heart and lung disease and send new state aid to suburban Washington hospitals under a plan approved by two House committees in Annapolis yesterday. The committees' plan for distributing Maryland's share of the national tobacco settlement is substantially different from the approach favored by Senate leaders -- assuring a showdown between the two chambers in the remaining three weeks of the legislative session. The Senate plan, approved by a key committee Friday, would direct much of the money to cancer prevention, treatment and research.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2005
The discovery that the painkillers Vioxx and Celebrex may increase the risk of heart problems wasn't just a disappointment to people with chronic pain and the doctors who treat them. The news has threatened to cut off a promising arm of research in cancer prevention. For the last decade, scientists have been compiling evidence that those and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs seem to interfere with the early processes that can give rise to cancer, particularly cancers of the digestive tract.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. - A drug now used to treat breast cancer might be able to prevent prostate cancer in men with a pre-cancerous condition, doctors said here on yesterday. Another study suggested that the widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins might stave off breast cancer. But experts cautioned that more studies were needed before the drugs were prescribed to prevent prostate and breast cancer. "We are not ready to recommend statins for those patients who do not have lipid abnormalities," said Dr. Vikas Khurana of Louisiana State University, an author of the statin study, referring to people with high cholesterol.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 9, 2012
The American Cancer Society is launched a major, long-term prevention study across the country and is looking for people in the Baltimore area to participate. The society says 12 million people have survived cancer and many more have avoided it. This study could provide the information to keep others healthy. The study, much like the one that initially linked tobacco to cancer, will look at other genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors that may play into a person's risk of getting or preventing the disease.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 11, 2012
Two new government studies show young people are still putting themselves at risk for skin cancer by getting sunburned and going to indoor tanning beds. One study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that half of those aged 18 to 29 had at least one sunburn it the past year, though they were increasingly using sunscreen, seeking shade and wearing protective clothing. The other study by the National Cancer Institute found 32 percent of those 18 to 21 were going to indoor tanning salons and 30 percent of those 22 to 25 were.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 15, 2012
Want to give to the Maryland Cancer Fund? Officials have made it easy this year. You just have to check a Line 37 on your state tax form and fill in the amount. The money will get deducted from your refund or added to you bill. The contribution is also t ax deductible. The fund provides cancer prevention, detection and treatment programs. "Cancer is the second leading cause of death in Maryland," said Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene , in a statement. "Giving to the Maryland Cancer Fund is a great way to help your community.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | October 29, 2011
When Nawal Qalbi enrolled in a belly dancing class at the Carroll County YMCA five years ago, she never dreamed she would find her calling. Qalbi discovered the ancient dance form offered not just exercise, but camaraderie. "I was curious, really," said Qalbi said about signing up for that first class. "I thought I would be going in and be one of the oldest. There were so many women of different shapes, sizes and age groups. "It was very refreshing to see such a mixture of women in this classroom, and everybody enjoying each other's company.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Cheryl Corbin's mother and grandmother had breast cancer, so an oncologist suggested she be tested for an inherited gene mutation linked to the disease. But when the results came in, she didn't show up to hear them. "I was afraid to hear the words," Corbin, 47, said. "There's no turning back from there. " A genetic counselor tracked her down at the University of Maryland Women's Health clinic, where she is an office manager, and told her that she had the mutation that gave her an 85 percent chance of developing breast cancer . Corbin had no doubt about her next move - she had her breasts removed.
NEWS
August 2, 2008
In his column "Up in smoke" (Commentary, July 28), Patrick Basham grossly mischaracterized the National Cancer Institute's American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention (ASSIST). I was the senior scientific editor for the National Cancer Institute's monograph that evaluated the study, and I know that, contrary to Mr. Basham's assertions, ASSIST was found to be effective. The 17 states that implemented ASSIST policy interventions had significantly lower smoking rates at the end of the program than states that did not implement the program had. Indeed, if all states had implemented such interventions, the National Cancer Institute estimates that there would be 1.2 million fewer smokers nationally today.
NEWS
February 18, 1994
Dietitians from the county Health Department will visit area supermarkets today to answer shoppers' questions about nutrition and cancer prevention.As part of the department's Learn To Live Cancer Prevention Campaign, low-fat recipes as well as a nutrition newsletter will be made available to shoppers.The dietitians will be at Basics in Linthicum, 7069 Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd., from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., and Farm Fresh in Brooklyn Park, 8 Hammonds Lane, from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
NEWS
October 14, 2001
Police Department asks for public's help after suspicious death Anne Arundel County police are asking for the public's help in determining how a Baltimore teen-ager spent the week before he was found dead in the Patapsco River on Tuesday. The body of Fernando Miranda Garcia, 18, of the 400 block of S. Collington Ave. in Baltimore, was discovered by a fisherman along the shoreline near Hammonds Ferry Road in Linthicum. Autopsy results to determine how Garcia died are pending, but county police are investigating his death as suspicious, said Officer Charles Ravenell, a police spokesman.
FEATURES
April 17, 2008
Linda Rittelmann has been named executive director and chief operating officer of Greater Baltimore Medical Associates, which is a group of more than 40 physician practices owned by Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Rittelmann, who will be in charge of staffing, billing, performance improvement and budgeting, has 17 years of executive health care experience in managed-care contracting, information-systems applications, cardiovascular and orthopedic program management, capital-project management, strategic planning and marketing.
FEATURES
By Linda Shrieves | November 8, 2007
Here's a question to ponder: Why is acne common in the Western, industrialized world, while the pimples that trouble American kids are rare in developing countries? It's a puzzler -- and one that prompted Australian researchers to ask whether changing the diet of teenagers would have any effect on acne. The results could change the way dermatologists think about diet. To test their theory, the Australian researchers recruited 50 young men between ages 15 and 25 with mild-to-moderate acne.
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