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October 6, 2011
Listings are accepted on a space-available basis. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday prior to date of publication at the latest. To submit volunteer items, mail to Volunteers, Patuxent Publishing Co. Editorial, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; email hccalendar@patuxent.com ; fax 410-332-6336; or call 410-332-6497. Historic Ellicott City - Seeking volunteers for the 27th annual Decorator Show House for the following positions: hostesses, preview party assistants, office help, parking assistants and individuals with computer skills.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 8, 2014
I think it should be a person's own choice to do whatever drug a person chooses as long as it doesn't involve committing a crime to acquire the drug. When it comes to marijuana, we should be able to have and smoke as much as we like ( "Fixing Md.'s marijuana law," Oct. 3). People like me and many others work very hard for what we have and like to smoke at the end of the day to relax and relieve stress. Ignorant people consider us criminals for doing so. It doesn't kill anyone and it's very helpful to cancer patients going through chemotherapy or radiation treatments.
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NEWS
March 23, 2014
I have a long medical history including multiple bouts of cancer. The removal of life-time caps on insurance coverage is just one of the many reasons I believe we need to keep the Affordable Care Act that is often referred to as "Obamacare. " There are thousands, if not millions, of people who have been helped by the ACA since its inception in October 2010, especially children who had cancer in their early years. It is a shame we have not heard more about the benefits rather than just the problems ( "Obamacare hurts more than helps," March 16)
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 5, 2014
The hotel chain Extended Stay America is partnering with the American Cancer Society to provide free and discounted rooms cancer patients being treated away from home. The chain will offer 40,000 rooms to patients and caregivers, including half of them for free, over two years. The other half will be available for $12 a night. The effort is launching in Baltimore and nine other cities, after an initial pilot program in three cities. The Cancer Society program is called Hope Lodge , and currently offers rooms in Baltimore and around the country.
HEALTH
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
Just before the new year, a popular Inner Harbor restaurant spread holiday cheer by serving dinner to cancer patients and their families. Sullivan's Steakhouse took over the dining room for one evening at the American Cancer Society's Hope Lodge, an inn that offers free accommodations to patients undergoing treatment at nearby hospitals. The restaurant staff arrived at the lodge Dec. 29 and played host, offering guests their best dishes, their chef and their wait staff. The chef prepared several entrees, and the wait staff served about 50 diners in a festively decorated room at the lodge on West Lexington Street.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2011
Two 12-year-old cousins are turning multicolored squares of paper into symbols of hope for those facing critical illness. Chad Fisher and Max Schnitzer have schooled themselves in the traditional Japanese art of origami, or paper folding. The boys, students at Pikesville Middle School, have promised to create 1,000 paper cranes for patients at St. Joseph Medical Center's Cancer Institute. "Japanese folklore says if you fold 1,000 cranes, you will get your wish," said Chad, whose wish is that his mother will recover from breast cancer . Although health regulations prevent the boys from interacting with patients, they have given Andrea Cooper, the hospital's artist in residence, cranes and labels for patients to attach notes to the paper birds.
NEWS
By Paul Celano | February 27, 2012
Our lawmakers in Annapolis have an opportunity to eliminate a significant disparity in access to chemotherapy for the thousands of Marylanders treated for cancer each year. The access issue is one of cost and the difference in how much insurance companies require patients to pay for intravenous chemotherapy vs. oral chemotherapy. Simply put, when cancer patients are treated with intravenous chemotherapy drugs - which for years were virtually the only treatment option - their share of the costs under most insurance plans is limited to office visit co-pays, usually about $20 or $30 per session.
HEALTH
By Rob Kasper and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 12, 2010
O n land, Viki Anders has some trouble getting around. She walks with crutches, the result of a foot injury and a subsequent condition called complex regional pain syndrome. But in the water, she swims like a dolphin. Early Sunday, a few days shy of her 60th birthday, Anders eased herself into the pool at the McDonogh School and swam the butterfly for 1,500 meters, almost a mile. She did it to raise money for the Johns Hopkins Patient and Family Fund. It assists needy cancer patients and their families with expenses not covered by insurance during their treatment.
HEALTH
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
A stranger approached a cluster of women laughing and chatting at an Annapolis coffee shop and politely inquired what type of group was having so much fun. "One that you don't want to join," answered 55-year-old Sally Ring, setting off another wave of giggles. Moments earlier, Ring had told the group her cancer had spread to her bones and she'd had another stint on a ventilator. Her colorful storytelling had the women doubled over. "My motto for through this whole thing is that somebody has it much worse," Ring said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Toni L. Killefer, a former preschool teacher who mentored cancer patients and participated in breast cancer research, died Monday of metastatic breast cancer at her Stevenson home. She was 49. "I took care of Toni for a number of years, and she had her eyes wide open on this. She always knew what she was up against and she was very straightforward," said Dr. John H. Fetting III, a Johns Hopkins Hospital oncologist. "All she wanted to be was a mom and look out for her children with as little fuss about her illness, and just be able to manage.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | June 5, 2014
On behalf of The Upper Chesapeake Health Foundation and its volunteers in Chesapeake Cancer Alliance (CCA) we want to express our sincere appreciation to all who participated and attended the recent inaugural Amanda Hichkad CCA Celebration Walk at Ripken Stadium. This celebrates family, friends and community to honor and memorialize cancer patients and their families. Over 1,500 walkers participated, raising over $100,000 for Cancer LifeNet programs at the University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health's Kaufman Cancer Center.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Nothing could save Albert P. "Skip" Viragh Jr. from pancreatic cancer, but a $65 million gift from his foundation will help other patients suffering from that and other deadly cancers. The money will be used to help pay for construction of a patient care building at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, the medical institution announced Tuesday. The new building will bear the name of Viragh, an innovative Maryland mutual fund investor who died from pancreatic cancer in 2003 at age 62 after receiving treatment at Johns Hopkins.
NEWS
March 23, 2014
I have a long medical history including multiple bouts of cancer. The removal of life-time caps on insurance coverage is just one of the many reasons I believe we need to keep the Affordable Care Act that is often referred to as "Obamacare. " There are thousands, if not millions, of people who have been helped by the ACA since its inception in October 2010, especially children who had cancer in their early years. It is a shame we have not heard more about the benefits rather than just the problems ( "Obamacare hurts more than helps," March 16)
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Zachary "Zach" Lederer used to say he was "living the dream. " Even as his physical health deteriorated in the final year of his life, he told others he felt fantastic. Hundreds of people gathered Friday afternoon to remember the former manager of the Maryland men's basketball team, who died March 11 of brain cancer. The 20-year-old inspired cancer patients across the globe with his signature pose of pumping his fists with flexed biceps - a move that the crowd gathered at the Church of the Resurrection mimicked together in the pews during his memorial.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Zachary M. "Zach" Lederer's personal struggle and determination to survive brain cancer gave hope and inspiration to people across the world. The University of Maryland, College Park student and manager of the men's basketball team became known for "Zaching" - a muscle pose he made when he was recuperating after surgery. Mr. Lederer died Tuesday of the disease at his parents' Ellicott City home. He was 20. "We had a great bond. … It really hurt me seeing him hurt so bad," said Maryland basketball player Nick Faust, who was a freshman when Mr. Lederer started as the team manager.
LIFESTYLE
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
Acupuncture, the traditional Chinese medicine that uses needles for treatment, is increasingly being used with cancer patients. Dr. Ting Bao, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and faculty at Maryland's Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center and Center for Integrative Medicine, regularly used acupuncture to alleviate pain and treat side effects. Question : How common is it for cancer patients to seek relief using acupuncture? Answer : It is difficult for me to come up with a percentage because there have not been many studies performed to answer this question yet. What I can say is that based on my experience at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, more and more cancer patients are interested in integrating acupuncture into their cancer treatment.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 5, 2014
The hotel chain Extended Stay America is partnering with the American Cancer Society to provide free and discounted rooms cancer patients being treated away from home. The chain will offer 40,000 rooms to patients and caregivers, including half of them for free, over two years. The other half will be available for $12 a night. The effort is launching in Baltimore and nine other cities, after an initial pilot program in three cities. The Cancer Society program is called Hope Lodge , and currently offers rooms in Baltimore and around the country.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
After her first round of breast cancer treatment, Judy Davanzo was troubled by the appearance of her husband. "At the end of it, he just looked beat," says Davanzo, a 47-year-old Timonium mother of two. "That struck me. " Even when she felt well enough that her husband, Drew, could get away to play golf with friends or their family could go on vacation, Davanzo says, her medication would inevitably stop working or she'd take a turn for...
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