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February 27, 1999
Jose Quintero,74, a Tony Award-winning theater director whose landmark productions of Eugene O'Neill dramas renewed interest in one of America's greatest playwrights, died yesterday of cancer in New York. Mr. Quintero won two Tonys, for a production of "Long Day's Journey into Night" and for directing "A Moon for the Misbegotten."Pub Date: 2/27/99
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NEWS
February 27, 1999
Jose Quintero,74, a Tony Award-winning theater director whose landmark productions of Eugene O'Neill dramas renewed interest in one of America's greatest playwrights, died yesterday of cancer in New York. Mr. Quintero won two Tonys, for a production of "Long Day's Journey into Night" and for directing "A Moon for the Misbegotten."Pub Date: 2/27/99
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NEWS
September 1, 1995
Bartlett Jere Whiting, 90, a professor emeritus of English at Harvard University who was renowned for his compilations of proverbs and for his classes on Chaucer, died Aug. 24 in Belfast, Maine.Selma Burke, 94, who sculpted the profile of Franklin Delano Roosevelt that appears on the dime, died Tuesday of cancer in New Hope, Pa.Hajime Mitarai, 56, the president of Canon Inc. who helped invent "bubble jet" printing, died of pneumonia yesterday in Tokyo, a company official said.Fischer S. Balck Jr., 57, an economist whose financial theories provided the cornerstone for Wall Street's global options market, died of cancer Wednesday in New Canaan, Conn.
NEWS
February 10, 1999
Bobby Troup, 80, a musician and actor who wrote the popular song "Route 66" and played a neurosurgeon on the 1970s television drama "Emergency," died Sunday in Los Angeles. Mr. Troup penned a little ditty in 1946 as he drove across the country to California, where he had dreams of making it big in music. He chose Route 66, and wrote: "If you ever plan to motor West: Travel my way, the highway that's the best. Get your kicks on Route 66!"Marius Schoon, 61, a prominent apartheid opponent who spent 12 years in prison and lost his wife and daughter in a police letter bomb explosion, died Sunday of lung cancer in Johannesburg, South Africa.
NEWS
February 28, 1998
Dr. Robert Gould, 73, a psychoanalyst who urged greater tolerance by society and worked toward ridding homosexuality of its mental illness stigma, died Wednesday of cancer in New York.Russell "Red" Reeder Jr., 95, a retired Army colonel and author of 40 books, primarily historical fiction, died of congestive heart failure Sunday in Washington. Many of his books dealt with the Military Academy, from where he graduated and where he was a star athlete. His book "The Mackenzie Raiders" became the basis of a short-lived television series in the 1950s.
NEWS
September 1, 1995
Frank PerryMovie directorFrank Perry, the director of "Diary of a Mad Housewife," "Mommie Dearest" and other films, died Tuesday of prostate cancer in New York City. He was 65 and lived in Aspen, Colo.When he was diagnosed with cancer five years ago, Mr. Perry was told he had about a year to live. He decided "to beat the disease" by making a film about it.The result, "On the Bridge," was his harrowing journal. Playing the leading role in his film, he explored diverse methods of treatment, interviewed cancer survivors and besieged his doctor with probing questions.
NEWS
September 29, 1995
Alison Steele, whose sultry voice and iron will helped her become one of the country's first female disc jockeys, died Wednesday of cancer in New York City. She was 58.She was widely known to late-night radio listeners as "the Nightbird." Her most recent perch was K-ROCK, a classic rock 'n' roll station in New York.Ms. Steele loved to work hours that most other people find good for sleeping. "I'm a night person," she said in 1971 when she was with WNEW she worked for about 14 years. "I think it has a mysterious quality.
NEWS
September 17, 1996
Dr. Maurice M. Black,78, an early champion of alternatives to radical mastectomies in the treatment of breast cancer, died Saturday of liver cancer in New York.An internationally renowned expert in the field of breast disease, he published 250 studies dating to July 1953, when he predicted that "the use of ultra radical surgical attempts to cure breast cancer are not consistent with the biology of the disease."Wing Cmdr. Clive Beadon,77, a World War II bomber pilot awarded one of Britain's top military honors for his bravery against Japanese forces, died Saturday in London.
NEWS
April 29, 1995
Otto, Friedrich, 66, a writer for Time magazine and an award-winning author, died Tuesday of lung cancer in New York. His books include "Decline and Fall," published in 1970, which won the George Polk Award; "A Portrait of Hollywood in the 1940s;" "Glenn Gould: A Life and Variations;" "The Death of Alice B. Toklas" and "Paris in the Age of Manet."Calvin Jackson, 91, an Army doctor who secretly recorded his experiences after he was captured by the Japanese in 1941 in World War II, died Wednesday in Kenton, Ohio.
NEWS
February 10, 1999
Bobby Troup, 80, a musician and actor who wrote the popular song "Route 66" and played a neurosurgeon on the 1970s television drama "Emergency," died Sunday in Los Angeles. Mr. Troup penned a little ditty in 1946 as he drove across the country to California, where he had dreams of making it big in music. He chose Route 66, and wrote: "If you ever plan to motor West: Travel my way, the highway that's the best. Get your kicks on Route 66!"Marius Schoon, 61, a prominent apartheid opponent who spent 12 years in prison and lost his wife and daughter in a police letter bomb explosion, died Sunday of lung cancer in Johannesburg, South Africa.
NEWS
February 28, 1998
Dr. Robert Gould, 73, a psychoanalyst who urged greater tolerance by society and worked toward ridding homosexuality of its mental illness stigma, died Wednesday of cancer in New York.Russell "Red" Reeder Jr., 95, a retired Army colonel and author of 40 books, primarily historical fiction, died of congestive heart failure Sunday in Washington. Many of his books dealt with the Military Academy, from where he graduated and where he was a star athlete. His book "The Mackenzie Raiders" became the basis of a short-lived television series in the 1950s.
NEWS
August 26, 1997
Tete Montoliu, 64, a pianist and one of Spain's most popular jazz artists, died of lung cancer Sunday in Barcelona. Mr. Montoliu, whose full name was Vicente Montoliu Massana, had been blind since birth. He is said to have begun demonstrating his talent at the piano when he was 4. A devoted fan of Thelonius Monk, he first broke onto the international scene when he was invited on a European tour by Lionel Hampton in 1955.Samuel L. Chase, 80, a broadcaster who developed radio programs on social issues in the 1960s and was a publisher of Billboard magazine, died Aug. 11 of heart problems in Mexico City.
NEWS
September 17, 1996
Dr. Maurice M. Black,78, an early champion of alternatives to radical mastectomies in the treatment of breast cancer, died Saturday of liver cancer in New York.An internationally renowned expert in the field of breast disease, he published 250 studies dating to July 1953, when he predicted that "the use of ultra radical surgical attempts to cure breast cancer are not consistent with the biology of the disease."Wing Cmdr. Clive Beadon,77, a World War II bomber pilot awarded one of Britain's top military honors for his bravery against Japanese forces, died Saturday in London.
NEWS
September 29, 1995
Alison Steele, whose sultry voice and iron will helped her become one of the country's first female disc jockeys, died Wednesday of cancer in New York City. She was 58.She was widely known to late-night radio listeners as "the Nightbird." Her most recent perch was K-ROCK, a classic rock 'n' roll station in New York.Ms. Steele loved to work hours that most other people find good for sleeping. "I'm a night person," she said in 1971 when she was with WNEW she worked for about 14 years. "I think it has a mysterious quality.
NEWS
September 1, 1995
Frank PerryMovie directorFrank Perry, the director of "Diary of a Mad Housewife," "Mommie Dearest" and other films, died Tuesday of prostate cancer in New York City. He was 65 and lived in Aspen, Colo.When he was diagnosed with cancer five years ago, Mr. Perry was told he had about a year to live. He decided "to beat the disease" by making a film about it.The result, "On the Bridge," was his harrowing journal. Playing the leading role in his film, he explored diverse methods of treatment, interviewed cancer survivors and besieged his doctor with probing questions.
NEWS
September 1, 1995
Bartlett Jere Whiting, 90, a professor emeritus of English at Harvard University who was renowned for his compilations of proverbs and for his classes on Chaucer, died Aug. 24 in Belfast, Maine.Selma Burke, 94, who sculpted the profile of Franklin Delano Roosevelt that appears on the dime, died Tuesday of cancer in New Hope, Pa.Hajime Mitarai, 56, the president of Canon Inc. who helped invent "bubble jet" printing, died of pneumonia yesterday in Tokyo, a company official said.Fischer S. Balck Jr., 57, an economist whose financial theories provided the cornerstone for Wall Street's global options market, died of cancer Wednesday in New Canaan, Conn.
NEWS
August 17, 1995
John Cameron SwayzeEarly TV journalistJohn Cameron Swayze, one of television's first evening news anchormen and the man who introduced the sentence "It takes a licking and keeps on ticking" into popular culture as the voice of Timex watches, died yesterday at his home in Sarasota, Fla. He was 89.Mr. Swayze, whose crisp but folksy voice made him one of the first television personalities, started his career as a journalist, first as a newspaper reporter, then a radio broadcaster. He switched to television in 1949 as the host of the "Camel News Caravan" on NBC.After his news show ended in 1956, Mr. Swayze became the pitchman for Timex watches.
NEWS
August 26, 1997
Tete Montoliu, 64, a pianist and one of Spain's most popular jazz artists, died of lung cancer Sunday in Barcelona. Mr. Montoliu, whose full name was Vicente Montoliu Massana, had been blind since birth. He is said to have begun demonstrating his talent at the piano when he was 4. A devoted fan of Thelonius Monk, he first broke onto the international scene when he was invited on a European tour by Lionel Hampton in 1955.Samuel L. Chase, 80, a broadcaster who developed radio programs on social issues in the 1960s and was a publisher of Billboard magazine, died Aug. 11 of heart problems in Mexico City.
NEWS
August 17, 1995
John Cameron SwayzeEarly TV journalistJohn Cameron Swayze, one of television's first evening news anchormen and the man who introduced the sentence "It takes a licking and keeps on ticking" into popular culture as the voice of Timex watches, died yesterday at his home in Sarasota, Fla. He was 89.Mr. Swayze, whose crisp but folksy voice made him one of the first television personalities, started his career as a journalist, first as a newspaper reporter, then a radio broadcaster. He switched to television in 1949 as the host of the "Camel News Caravan" on NBC.After his news show ended in 1956, Mr. Swayze became the pitchman for Timex watches.
NEWS
April 29, 1995
Otto, Friedrich, 66, a writer for Time magazine and an award-winning author, died Tuesday of lung cancer in New York. His books include "Decline and Fall," published in 1970, which won the George Polk Award; "A Portrait of Hollywood in the 1940s;" "Glenn Gould: A Life and Variations;" "The Death of Alice B. Toklas" and "Paris in the Age of Manet."Calvin Jackson, 91, an Army doctor who secretly recorded his experiences after he was captured by the Japanese in 1941 in World War II, died Wednesday in Kenton, Ohio.
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