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By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Displaying his characteristic courage, Zach Lederer bravely attempts to recreate the notorious strongman pose - biceps flexed and fists clenched - that turned a 2012 photo of his steely-eyed resolve to fight cancer into an Internet craze called "Zaching. " But debilitating weakness on the left side of his body, caused by swelling on the right side of his brain after treatment for a third brain tumor, has left him unable to raise his atrophied left arm above his chest. The pose may not be possible right now, but the spirit behind it remains steadfast.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Displaying his characteristic courage, Zach Lederer bravely attempts to recreate the notorious strongman pose - biceps flexed and fists clenched - that turned a 2012 photo of his steely-eyed resolve to fight cancer into an Internet craze called "Zaching. " But debilitating weakness on the left side of his body, caused by swelling on the right side of his brain after treatment for a third brain tumor, has left him unable to raise his atrophied left arm above his chest. The pose may not be possible right now, but the spirit behind it remains steadfast.
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NEWS
August 8, 2004
On August 5, 2004, HUGH Y. RIENHOFF, of Naples FLA passed away. A celelbrated of his life will be held at teh Elkridge Club on Thursday, August 26 at 4 P.M IN liue lof flwoers, donations may be made to Greater Blatimore Medical Center, Cancer Foundation, 6701 N. Charles St. 21204.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | January 31, 2012
Archbishop Spalding football coach Mike Whittles plans to be on hand Saturday night at Ellie's Place in Millersville for a fundraiser for pancreatic cancer research. The event will kick off at 7 p.m. and will feature door prizes, a silent auction and a 50-50 raffle. Ellie's will also contribute 10 percent of its profits for the night. All proceeds will benefit the Mike Whittles Johns Hopkins Pancreatic Cancer Foundation. Whittles is approaching a year as a survivor of stage four pancreatic cancer and continues to undergo chemotherapy.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - The nation's largest breast cancer foundation honored Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat, with a lifetime achievement award yesterday for more than a quarter-century of work on breast cancer and women's health issues. Mikulski, who in 1992 sponsored a new initiative setting national quality standards for mammographies, accepted the award from the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation at its annual conference. The architect in 1990 of a law to provide low-income women with Pap smears and mammograms, Mikulski followed up in 2000 by helping to push through a measure that allows Medicaid to cover treatment for women with breast or cervical cancer.
NEWS
May 11, 1999
The first in a series of six lunchtime Breast Cancer Awareness Seminars for Baltimore police personnel will be held tomorrow in the atrium of the headquarters annex building, 601 E. Fayette St.Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes said the seminars, which run from noon to 1 p.m., also will be held June 9, July 14, Aug. 18, Sept. 15 and Oct. 20. She said they were made possible with a grant from the Maryland Chapter of the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.Pub Date: 5/11/99
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 30, 2000
At the 12th annual Crystal Ball, the "Humanitarian of the Year" for the Mildred Mindell Cancer Foundation was honored for his efforts fighting cancer on the job as well as off. Award-winner Dr. Albert Blumberg, the vice-chair of radiation oncology at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, is also president of Smoke Free Maryland and served on the Governor's Task Force to End Smoking in Maryland. The gala raised $65,000 for GBMC's radiation oncology infusion services. About 475 guests gathered at Martin's West to applaud the man of the evening, including: Revanne Aronoff, Carole Diamond, Rita Shemer and Arline Steinberg, event co-chairs; Carol Pondfield, Barbara Kreshtool, Eileen Chiat, Linda Kreshtool and Marsha Glassband, event committee members; Dina Klicos, event coordinator; Bill Kroh, GBMC Foundation board chair; Larry Merlis, president and CEO of GBMC; Sheila Riggs and Sayra Meyerhoff, GBMC Healthcare board members; Bill Knott, president of First Union Bank; Larry Macklin, senior vice president at Bank of America; and Dr. Eva Zinreich, GBMC radiation oncologist.
NEWS
February 27, 1995
Photographer Marion E. Warren and his daughter, archivist Mame Warren, will present a slide lecture based on their new book, "Bringing Back the Bay," Friday at the Captain Salem Avery House Museum.Sponsored by the Shady Side Rural Heritage Society, the lecture will begin at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5.Information: 867-2866.Zeta Tau Alpha event benefits breast cancerThe Annapolis chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha will celebrate Zeta Day Saturday at the Governor Calvert House on State Circle.Registration is from 8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. The event will include lunch and the announcement of the Anne Arundel County Women of the Year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | February 7, 1999
It was major munchies and a movie at the Premium Cinema in Owings Mills for 200 supporters of the Mildred Mindell Cancer Foundation. The evening began with a serious sampling of the theater's restaurant fare. Guests then filed into two luxury theaters to enjoy "A Civil Action" starring John Travolta.The night's $4,000 in proceeds benefited the University of Maryland Medical System's Greenebaum Cancer Center for Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation, where Eileen Diener, the daughter of the Mindell foundation's past president, Linda Kreshtol, received a successful marrow transplant in March 1998.
FEATURES
September 29, 1994
Many fashion-minded organizations are doing their bit to help the fight against breast cancer. Here's a sampling of nearby events.* The Race for the Cure serves up a pasta party tomorrow at Saks Fifth Avenue in Owings Mills. Pasta, prizes, a silent auction and shopping are part of the package. Party tickets are $15 for Race entrants and $25 for rooters. Saks will close to the public at 6:30 p.m., and admission will be by party ticket only.* Owings Mills Mall and shops' schedule of events throughout October:Pink rhinestone breast cancer awareness pins will be sold at mall stations for $15.Glamour Shots will donate all of its $11 sitting fee.The Mildred Mindell Cancer Foundation will be selling its "Lettuce Surprise You" cookbook on Oct. 8 and 9 with 20 percent of sales going to the Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 24, 2011
Colleges No. 8 Duke women rally past No. 14 Terps Senior Lydia Hastings got the No. 14 Maryland women's soccer team off to a promising start with a sixth-minute goal, but host No. 8 Duke (15-2-1, 7-1-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) scored three times in a span of 15 minutes for a 3-1 win Sunday afternoon. The Terrapins (9-4-4, 3-4-2) finish up the regular season Thursday when they host No. 7 North Carolina at 7 p.m. More women's soccer: Host Navy earned a 3-0 win over Holy Cross (2-12-3, 0-5-1 Patriot League)
NEWS
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
Most folks know Green Spring Station as Lutherville's chic collection of shops and restaurants. But the Mildred Mindell Cancer Foundation made the most of the building's history as an old train station for its Tasting at the Station fundraiser. Foundation co-presidents Nancy Goldberg and Lynn Fram and event chair Lisa Sawyer played "conductors," as they took guests' tickets and showed them to their seats. The party featured several food and wine "stations," and soon, everyone had a favorite "stop."
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | April 28, 2008
"Give me a head with hair, long beautiful hair ... My hair like Jesus wore it, Hallelujah, I adore it." That ode to flowing locks, from the 1968 hippie musical Hair, would not have served yesterday as a rallying cry for the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity at the Johns Hopkins University. Instead of clinging to vanity and visions of Samson-like valor, a half-dozen SigEp brothers submitted, with only minor bouts of trepidation, to a good shearing for a good cause. "It's going to be painful," said Christopher Viemeister, 20, the fraternity's philanthropy chairman, as he and his wavy brown mane prepared to go under the electric shaver.
NEWS
By Blythe Bernhard and Blythe Bernhard,McClatchey-Tribune | October 20, 2006
Every October, products from tweezers to toothpaste get packaged in pink. They're all sold with the promise of promoting breast cancer awareness or benefiting breast cancer charities. Breast cancer has become the darling disease of corporate philanthropy - especially during national breast cancer awareness month. But are the pink promotions more about boosting corporate profits via female-friendly marketing? Although heart disease and lung cancer kill more women each year, experts say breast cancer is considered safer for companies to latch onto.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
Of the more than 20,000 men, women and children who participated in Maryland's 12th annual Race for the Cure - held yesterday morning on the streets north of Ravens stadium - few stopped to talk about their personal experiences with breast cancer. Instead, they wore their stories pinned to their backs on bright pink signs inscribed with the names of victims and survivors while on either the one-mile or five-kilometer course. "In Memory of Mom," read many of the signs. "In Celebration of My Sister," read others.
NEWS
August 8, 2004
On August 5, 2004, HUGH Y. RIENHOFF, of Naples FLA passed away. A celelbrated of his life will be held at teh Elkridge Club on Thursday, August 26 at 4 P.M IN liue lof flwoers, donations may be made to Greater Blatimore Medical Center, Cancer Foundation, 6701 N. Charles St. 21204.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 26, 2002
Coppin State College president's retirement One room wasn't enough to hold all those who came to honor retiring Coppin State College President Dr. Calvin W. Burnett. Rooms at each end of a Wyndham Baltimore Inner Harbor Hotel corridor bustled with people eager to congratulate Dr. Burnett on his 32 years of service at Coppin. And that was only the cocktail hour. Then, doors in the middle of the hallway opened -- revealing elaborate crystal chandeliers twinkling above the ballroom full of tables set for dinner.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1998
Despite rain and dreary skies, about 10,000 people walked and ran through downtown Baltimore yesterday, raising $550,000 to help find a cure for breast cancer.Organizers of Maryland Race for the Cure were surprised by the turnout."We were absolutely floored at the number of people who came," said Joanne Kelsey, who co-chaired the event. "I fully expected to have about 5,000 people."Starting at 8: 30 a.m., participants raced from Conway and Light streets, through downtown to Eager Street and back to Rash Field at the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - The nation's largest breast cancer foundation honored Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat, with a lifetime achievement award yesterday for more than a quarter-century of work on breast cancer and women's health issues. Mikulski, who in 1992 sponsored a new initiative setting national quality standards for mammographies, accepted the award from the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation at its annual conference. The architect in 1990 of a law to provide low-income women with Pap smears and mammograms, Mikulski followed up in 2000 by helping to push through a measure that allows Medicaid to cover treatment for women with breast or cervical cancer.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2002
In an event marked equally by celebration and remembrance, some 20,000 people wearing the pink-and-white colors of a national movement snaked through Baltimore's downtown streets yesterday to support the fight against breast cancer. Tacked to the backs of many were the names of friends and relatives who died of the disease. But the 10th annual Maryland Race for the Cure -- a fund-raiser that drew serious runners along with casual but determined walkers -- carried an optimistic tone set by the large number of women who have fought cancer and survived.
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