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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
State health officials released an ambitious plan Tuesday to reduce cancer deaths, using the latest strategies to prevent, detect and treat the disease — and save the lives of an additional 1,200 Marylanders a year. "Our goal in Maryland is to have to lowest incidence of cancer of any state," said Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, in announcing the Maryland Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan. "This is our road map. " The plan, which includes the reduction of racial disparities and an increase in screening, is designed to maintain Maryland's progress in battling cancer.
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NEWS
February 9, 2014
As a lung cancer survivor who began smoking as a teenager because it was cool, I know the dangers of smoking first hand. I volunteer for the American Cancer Society as a recovery coach for lung and esophageal cancer patients. In addition, I work as a cancer registrar at MedStar Franklin Square Hospital and record tumor statistics for the many lung cancer diagnoses. I was diagnosed at age 49 with lung cancer and had both the fright and fight of my life. Luckily, I'm still here and can enjoy my beautiful little grandson, although, because I also have COPD as a result of my smoking, I have trouble keeping up with him. We've made a lot of progress against tobacco, but there is still work to do in Maryland.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1994
In an attempt to find causes for the high rate of cancer deaths among Anne Arundel County residents, the County Council last night approved a resolution creating a task force to study the problem.The task force, an idea conceived by Councilwoman Diane Evans and the Greater Severna Park Council, will bring together 15 people who either live or work in the county to gather and study data on cancer in Anne Arundel. They will work with Dr. Katherine Farrell, deputy county health officer, who is a specialist in environmental health.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Peter Angelos, the personal injury lawyer who owns the Baltimore Orioles, donated $2.5 million to MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center to establish a lung disease treatment center in his name, he and hospital officials announced Wednesday. The gift, the largest single donation in the hospital's 115-year history, will more than pay for renovating a 3,000-square-foot space where doctors from various disciplines related to lung disease will collaborate and see patients. Those diseases include cancers like mesothelioma that are caused by asbestos exposure, the specialty of Angelos' Baltimore law firm.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Jonathan Rockoff and Chris Emery and Jonathan Rockoff,SUN REPORTERS | January 18, 2007
Cancer deaths have declined in the United States for the second year in a row, suggesting that decades of research into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the disease are paying off. A study by the American Cancer Society, released yesterday, found that at least 3,000 fewer people died of cancer in 2004 than in the previous year, a decrease that continues despite a population growing in numbers and in age. According to the ACS, 553,888 people...
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | January 23, 1991
Health officials who have been poring over the state's cancer statistics for the past few months said yesterday they believed that tobacco and alcohol use were the major reasons why Maryland led the nation in cancer death rates.At least 42 percent of Maryland's cancer deaths, including lung, pancreas, esophagus, bladder, pharynx, liver and larynx, are linked to either tobacco use, alcohol use or both, Dr. John Southard of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said yesterday. And the Maryland death rate for all of these cancers is higher than the U.S. average, he said.
NEWS
By Robyn Washington | August 27, 1991
For a long time, it was assumed that race was the primary factor predisposing certain groups of people to developing cancer. Health experts are now finding that race alone does not predispose one to cancer, but that socioeconomic status contributes to high rates of cancer and cancer-related deaths.The inability to access health care systems, certain lifestyles and dietary habits, and attitudes toward cancer are believed to be the primary reasons why blacks and other minorities more often become victims of the disease.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,National Center for Health StatisticsSun Staff Writer | February 1, 1994
Maryland has retained its distinction as the state with the second-highest cancer death rate in the nation, trailing neighboring Delaware by a slim margin.The mid-Atlantic region's hold on cancer death is particularly striking when Washington is added to the picture. There, 230 out of every 100,000 inhabitants die of cancer each year, a rate exceeding that of any state.Maryland's other neighbors -- Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia -- also have cancer death rates among the top 10.Statistics comparing cancer deaths rates across the United States appear in Cancer Facts & Figures-1994, released yesterday by the National Cancer Society.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,American Cancer SocietySun Staff Writer | January 29, 1995
Maryland has dropped from second to third place in the American Cancer Society's annual ranking of cancer death rates in the 50 states, a change that owes more to Louisiana's worsening toll than to major improvements here.The cancer mortality rate dropped by one death per 100,000 people -- a difference that is not considered statistically significant. In the meantime, Louisiana's rate grew by a slightly larger degree, giving that state the dubious distinction of ranking second to Delaware.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 9, 1994
The sharp decline in deaths from cardiovascular disease in the United States during the past two decades has been accompanied by an unexpected increase in the overall incidence of cancer and cancer deaths among people over 55, researchers say.White men born during the baby boom of 1948-57 have non-smoking-related cancer rates three times as high as their grandfathers, but the rate of cardiovascular disease has fallen by 43 percent, a government research team...
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 29, 2013
September marks Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and with prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States, the Harford County Health Department urges men to consider the facts about prostate cancer and the importance of a healthy prostate. In 2013, The American Cancer Society estimates that 4,880 men in Maryland will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 560 will die from it this year, while across the country, approximately 238,590 men will be diagnosed and 38,460 will die from this cancer this year.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
An influential U.S. health care panel's recommendation for lung cancer screening of high-risk patients could fortify Baltimore-area hospitals' efforts to prevent deaths from the disease, which kills more each year than the next four deadliest cancers combined. Patients ages 55-80 who are or have been heavy smokers will likely be able to get insurance coverage for preventive CT scans examining their lungs for abnormalities. Some patients have been paying up to $300 out-of-pocket for the procedures, and several local hospitals have invested in performing them more frequently as research indicated a possible benefit.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | November 27, 2012
Editor: November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month. This year, approximately 160,340 Americans are expected to die from lung cancer, accounting for 28 percent of all cancer deaths. That is why there is an entire month dedicated to this disease, raising awareness and increasing research to help put an end to it. People like to think that lung cancer is a self-inflicted disease from smoking. The truth is that radon, second-hand smoke and air pollution all can cause lung cancer.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
State health officials released an ambitious plan Tuesday to reduce cancer deaths, using the latest strategies to prevent, detect and treat the disease — and save the lives of an additional 1,200 Marylanders a year. "Our goal in Maryland is to have to lowest incidence of cancer of any state," said Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, in announcing the Maryland Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan. "This is our road map. " The plan, which includes the reduction of racial disparities and an increase in screening, is designed to maintain Maryland's progress in battling cancer.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
CT scans can reduce deaths by 20 percent in older, heavy smokers by detecting tumors earlier, according to results released Thursday from an eight-year-long national study. The study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and launched in 2002, aimed to see if the tests, which are more sensitive than X-rays, would affect the outcomes for those with lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the country. The disease was estimated to have killed 159,390 people in 2009, according to the institute — more people than killed by breast, prostate, colon and pancreatic cancer combined.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
After Kate Canada had her first child three years ago, phthalates was the chemical buzzword that health-conscious moms like her went out of their way to avoid. So she tossed the plastic toys and replaced them with wooden ones. When she had a second daughter this year, BPA became the substance to fear. So she bought all new baby bottles and got vigilant about stocking her pantry with all things BPA-free. Then, a few weeks ago, she heard about an annual report from the President's Cancer Panel that, for the first time, painted a dire picture about potential cancer risks from a legion of environmental hazards.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 7, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer has given the state health and environment secretaries 30 days to draw up recommendations for reducing cancer death rates in Maryland that topped those of any other state this year.Specifically, the governor said he asked the officials to report back to him on cancer-prevention programs in Baltimore and in Allegany County, to examine what the causes of the high rates may be, and to make recommendations for lowering the cancer death rates.Baltimore leads the state in cancer deaths and Allegany County has high death rates in several types of cancer, according to the latest five years of statistics available, 1983 to 1987.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 10, 2007
U.S. cancer deaths declined for the second year in a row in 2004, but there are worrisome signs that progress could falter, according to a new report from the American Cancer Society. Deaths fell by 3,014, following a decline of 369 deaths in 2003. While the number of cancer deaths in women increased slightly in 2003, the number fell for both sexes in 2004 - the first time that has happened since the government began keeping death statistics in the 1930s. The death rate for all cancers combined has dropped for 12 consecutive years, a total of 13.6 percent from 1991 to 2004.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | July 27, 2009
A new study that suggests that racial differences in biology could be a key reason black women are more likely to die of breast cancer than white women has reignited an intense debate among medical experts about the role of genetics versus factors such as poverty, diet and unequal access to quality health care. For nearly three decades, researchers have known about the disparity in death rates, but they have been puzzled over the reasons why. In Maryland, for example, the breast cancer death rate for black women is 15 percent higher than for white women, even though African-Americans have a lower incidence of the disease.
NEWS
By Deborah L. Shelton and Deborah L. Shelton,Tribune Newspapers | April 21, 2009
Women who have healthy ovaries removed when they have a hysterectomy face a higher risk of death, including from coronary heart disease and lung cancer, than those who keep their ovaries, new research shows. The finding, from a study published in the May issue of the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, challenges conventional wisdom that removing ovaries along with the uterus offers the best chance for long-term survival. Doctors have recommended for decades that women who get a hysterectomy consider having both ovaries removed - a surgical procedure called a bilateral oophorectomy - to prevent ovarian cancer later in life.
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