Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCancer Cluster
IN THE NEWS

Cancer Cluster

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
Neighbors of Fort Detrick were not diagnosed with cancer in greater numbers than the broader population of Frederick County during the period for which data are available, state health officials told the community Monday. But local activists said the state's analysis does not capture the history of cancer around the Army base because it does not take into account cases before 1992, when the state began compiling its cancer registry. Clifford Mitchell of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said cases recorded in the Maryland Cancer Registry from 1992-2008 within two miles of Fort Detrick showed no statistically significant increase in any type of cancer as compared to the rest of the county.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
Neighbors of Fort Detrick were not diagnosed with cancer in greater numbers than the broader population of Frederick County during the period for which data are available, state health officials told the community Monday. But local activists said the state's analysis does not capture the history of cancer around the Army base because it does not take into account cases before 1992, when the state began compiling its cancer registry. Clifford Mitchell of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said cases recorded in the Maryland Cancer Registry from 1992-2008 within two miles of Fort Detrick showed no statistically significant increase in any type of cancer as compared to the rest of the county.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Claire Adams and Claire Adams,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2000
When cancer was diagnosed in seven children in the small South River community of Londontown over the years, residents feared the worst: that something in the environment was poisoning their families. Parents clamored for an investigation, but it stalled in 1997. Health department officials told residents that the cases, though close together, weren't necessarily related. But worries about a possible cancer cluster did not go away, and concern in the Anne Arundel community grew. This rising anxiety and the perseverance of the afflicted children's parents have led the county health department to reopen its investigation of a childhood cancer rate among neighborhood children nearly five times the national average.
NEWS
May 28, 2006
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE: -- After a study last year by Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health uncovered 17 cancer cases among Anne Arundel County firefighters who trained in the 1970s, local officials have petitioned for a national study of cancer among firefighters. Last week, prodded by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health said it would fund a training program to analyze the cancer risk to firefighters exposed to toxins. County officials hope this could be a precursor to the more expansive study.
NEWS
May 28, 2006
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE: -- After a study last year by Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health uncovered 17 cancer cases among Anne Arundel County firefighters who trained in the 1970s, local officials have petitioned for a national study of cancer among firefighters. Last week, prodded by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health said it would fund a training program to analyze the cancer risk to firefighters exposed to toxins. County officials hope this could be a precursor to the more expansive study.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
MORE THAN a hundred Long Island women living close to high-voltage power lines develop breast cancer. Sixteen children from a Nevada county are stricken with leukemia. Fifteen employees of a Philadelphia chemical company are diagnosed with brain tumors. Is it coincidence? Cause and effect? Too hard to tell? For scientists who study these so-called "clusters" of disease, the answers all too often are frustratingly vague. "These situations are typically very challenging and unsatisfying to everyone involved," said Dr. Michael J. Thun, head of epidemiologic research at the American Cancer Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 4, 1992
In "The Distinguished Gentleman," Mr. Murphy goes to Washington, and discovers a city that is last in war, last in peace, and not even in the American League any more.The movie itself isn't much better: It's last in laughs, last in drama but first in Murphy ego, as he gives a performance that everybody has seen before, only louder.The gimmick in the plot is that it attempts to reverse the trajectory in all those other Washington movies, the ones where the naive and earnest crusader moves to D.C. and is corrupted by the greed and sleaze that is so a part of the system.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2004
Johns Hopkins epidemiologists explained last night their plans to study a possible cancer cluster in the Anne Arundel County Fire Department at a meeting with firefighters in Millersville. Researchers said they will interview sick firefighters and their families, collect studies on cancer among firefighters and examine the chemicals firefighters were exposed to at the county fire academy in Millersville. They said they will submit a report to state health officials in March and might recommend a longer, more detailed study.
NEWS
By From staff reports | October 17, 2004
Anne Arundel Firefighters' cancer is topic of town meeting Johns Hopkins doctors who are investigating a possible cancer cluster among Anne Arundel County firefighters will hold a town hall meeting tomorrow night at Old Mill High School. Hopkins doctors began the study this year at the request of state and local officials, who were concerned about reports that many firefighters had died from or were battling virulent cancers. Some firefighters have said they see a connection between the cancer and training activities involving possible carcinogens at the county fire academy in Millersville.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
After years of complaints from Marriottsville residents, Howard County officials have begun studying whether an unusual rash of cancer cases there is related to cancer-causing chemicals leaking from the Alpha Ridge Landfill.In this week's issue of the Alpha Ridge Newsletter, an occasional county publication mailed to 500 Marriottsville homes, Howard officials asked residents to report any known cancer cases to the county Health Department.Gail Bates, an aide to County Executive Charles I. Ecker, said that health officials also plan to write to residents of a community featured in an article in The Sun about the possibility of a cancer cluster related to Alpha Ridge.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2004
Johns Hopkins epidemiologists explained last night their plans to study a possible cancer cluster in the Anne Arundel County Fire Department at a meeting with firefighters in Millersville. Researchers said they will interview sick firefighters and their families, collect studies on cancer among firefighters and examine the chemicals firefighters were exposed to at the county fire academy in Millersville. They said they will submit a report to state health officials in March and might recommend a longer, more detailed study.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
MORE THAN a hundred Long Island women living close to high-voltage power lines develop breast cancer. Sixteen children from a Nevada county are stricken with leukemia. Fifteen employees of a Philadelphia chemical company are diagnosed with brain tumors. Is it coincidence? Cause and effect? Too hard to tell? For scientists who study these so-called "clusters" of disease, the answers all too often are frustratingly vague. "These situations are typically very challenging and unsatisfying to everyone involved," said Dr. Michael J. Thun, head of epidemiologic research at the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
By Claire Adams and Claire Adams,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2000
When cancer was diagnosed in seven children in the small South River community of Londontown over the years, residents feared the worst: that something in the environment was poisoning their families. Parents clamored for an investigation, but it stalled in 1997. Health department officials told residents that the cases, though close together, weren't necessarily related. But worries about a possible cancer cluster did not go away, and concern in the Anne Arundel community grew. This rising anxiety and the perseverance of the afflicted children's parents have led the county health department to reopen its investigation of a childhood cancer rate among neighborhood children nearly five times the national average.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 4, 1992
In "The Distinguished Gentleman," Mr. Murphy goes to Washington, and discovers a city that is last in war, last in peace, and not even in the American League any more.The movie itself isn't much better: It's last in laughs, last in drama but first in Murphy ego, as he gives a performance that everybody has seen before, only louder.The gimmick in the plot is that it attempts to reverse the trajectory in all those other Washington movies, the ones where the naive and earnest crusader moves to D.C. and is corrupted by the greed and sleaze that is so a part of the system.
NEWS
By SUN-SENTINEL | November 17, 1997
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Alarmed at the seemingly high rate of brain cancer among children in St. Lucie County, Fla., a group of mothers who courted controversy with their calls for a major health study are starting to feel vindicated.Last summer, the mother of a child who died organized other families, raised concerns about the local water and soil and generally set the population on "pins and needles," in the words of the Port St. Lucie mayor.At first, the mothers' effort seemed to stall as community leaders tried to stave off panic over a highly questionable public health threat.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | May 18, 2006
A federal safety agency announced yesterday that it would fund a training program to analyze the cancer risk to firefighters exposed to toxins, an issue highlighted by a cluster of illnesses among Anne Arundel County firefighters who trained at an academy in Millersville in the 1970s. County officials said the effort by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health falls short of a request by U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski for a full-blown study. But they hope NIOSH's decision to launch a national Hazardous Substance Training Program - which will determine whether firefighters' exposure to toxins raises their long-term risk for some cancers, including brain cancer, and heart disease - in conjunction with the International Association of Fire Fighters will build momentum toward a cancer study that would include the Anne Arundel County fire service.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.