Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCancer Cells
IN THE NEWS

Cancer Cells

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1995
In a novel approach to treating cancer, Johns Hopkins researchers plan to begin using prostate cancer patients' own tumor cells -- and gene therapy -- to enable the men's immune systems to kill the cancer.The treatment, involving a complicated gene manipulation, has been proven to work in animals with prostate and kidney cancers.Researchers believe it could be effective against other malignancies, such as colon cancer and melanoma.The treatment might offer the patient a kind of vaccination to ward off future attacks by a specific type of cancer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery and Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery,Sun reporters | March 23, 2007
A diagnosis of Stage IV metastatic breast cancer sounds like a death sentence. And, for some, it can be. It is both inoperable and incurable. But cancer experts say the disease is treatable, and its victims' prognoses vary as widely as their individual cancers. Elizabeth Edwards, wife of Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards, learned Monday that her breast cancer, first diagnosed and treated in 2004, has turned up in her bones. But chemical, hormonal and biological drug therapies can be used to keep it in check, said Dr. Michael Schultz, director of the breast center at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 19, 2014
Researchers in the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed and begun testing a vaccine that can “reprogram” pancreatic cancers to potentially make them more treatable. Pancreatic cancer is among the most fatal types of cancer. It isn't often caught early and generally becomes resistant to standard chemotherapy drugs. This study was conducted on those with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas , the most common form of the cancer and one that gives patients just a five percent chance of surviving five years.
NEWS
June 18, 1991
State police arrested a door-to-door salesman for trying to sell a phony cancer cure in southern Frederick County.About 1 p.m. yesterday, a resident of the Point of Rocks area called police to complain about a man promoting what he said was a cure for cancer. The salesman, saying "cancer cells cannot exist in a magnetic field," was selling magnets in a small box. An undercover policeman purchased several magnets from him.Louis Matacia, 60, of Bluemont, Va., was arrested after allegedly prescribing a treatment for cancer, representing to the public that he could cure or prescribe a treatment for cancer, and selling a device that is manufactured or represented to the public as a cancer cure.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 21, 2005
CHICAGO -- A drug for use in treating patients with advanced kidney cancer won government approval yesterday. The Food and Drug Administration said the drug, Nexavar, is a significant step forward. The current standard treatment for kidney cancer - immune therapy with interferon or interleukin-2 - has modest benefits and can be extremely toxic. Nexavar, developed at the University of Chicago, has few side effects, and some patients who started taking it more than two years ago are doing well, researchers said yesterday.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | August 5, 2005
What should you pack in a family first-aid kit when you travel? That depends, obviously, on who's in your family, what medical conditions they have, and whether you're trekking in the Himalayas or hanging out closer to civilization. At a minimum, said Josh Baker, director of health and safety for the American Red Cross of Massachusetts Bay, you should include: Adhesive tape Antiseptic ointment Band-Aids of assorted sizes Blanket (can be a metallicized emergency blanket that folds to the size of a cigarette pack)
NEWS
By Susan Ferraro and Susan Ferraro,New York Daily News | January 17, 1999
Over the past two years, doctors have beefed up their chemo- therapy arsenal against ovarian cancer from two drugs to about 10.Yet the truth remains: Survival rates are only 20 percent to 25 percent for those with advanced disease.Since 1971, as deaths from cervical cancer plummeted by 50 percent, ovarian cancer deaths rose by 50 percent, in part because there are still no routine screening tests. Most ovarian cancer is found only after it has spread. But for those who are diagnosed early, the cure rate is 90 percent.
FEATURES
By Jeff Nesmith and Jeff Nesmith,Cox News Service | December 7, 1994
Washington -- From the green, yucky juice of broccoli, cabbage, collards and the like, scientists have squeezed still another chemical that seems to inhibit cancer cells.The new substance stimulates production of enzymes that can break down carcinogens, including the female hormone estrogen, Texas A&M University researchers reported in today's issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.Trouble is, this chemical seems to work in almost the opposite way from other broccoli-derived compounds that are thought to have anti-cancer properties.
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Breast cancer kills when rogue tumor cells spread through the bloodstream, squeezing through microscopic gaps to inundate organs until they fail. But what if that spread could be prevented, the cells left free-floating to be crushed in capillaries or to self-destruct instead? A team of researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, joined by entrepreneurs and other academics, has been exploring that question for nearly a decade. What they have found challenges the basis for most breast cancer research and treatment, which focus on preventing tumor cells from multiplying.
NEWS
By Anne McDonnell Sill | June 27, 2013
Nina, a resident of East Baltimore, celebrated her 41st birthday last Sunday. Surrounded by family and friends, she struggled for breath to extinguish the candles on her cake. Two years ago Nina was diagnosed with breast cancer . Genetic testing and prophylaxis might have prevented her illness, but unlike actress Angela Jolie, her financial resources did not allow her to take the $3,400 test. Now Nina suffers from the same disease that took the life of her mother when she was in her 40s, and her older sister, who died at the age of 34 from breast and ovarian cancer.
EXPLORE
January 15, 2013
At Harford Friends School, an unusual field trip for middle school resulted from an equally unusual assignment for Cheryl Foley's science class: reading and discussing "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. " Eighth-graders from Harford Friends School recently toured the original lab at Johns Hopkins, where the HeLa cells were discovered. A HeLa cell is a cell type in an immortal cell line used in scientific research. Although many groups tour the facility every day, this group of middle schoolers was one of the youngest ever to be received by researchers.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
If there ever was a right time to be diagnosed with breast cancer , Beth Thompson found one. In February 2006, the pea-size tumor in her right breast was too small for a clinical trial of Herceptin, a targeted therapy that had proved effective in advanced stages of the aggressive cancer Thompson had. She underwent a lumpectomy and chemotherapy. When the cancer continued to show signs of growth, she had a double mastectomy. But soon after, her doctor, buoyed by promising trial results, encouraged her to consider Herceptin, developed by Genetech to target the protein that fuels the cancer's growth.
HEALTH
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
A stranger approached a cluster of women laughing and chatting at an Annapolis coffee shop and politely inquired what type of group was having so much fun. "One that you don't want to join," answered 55-year-old Sally Ring, setting off another wave of giggles. Moments earlier, Ring had told the group her cancer had spread to her bones and she'd had another stint on a ventilator. Her colorful storytelling had the women doubled over. "My motto for through this whole thing is that somebody has it much worse," Ring said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
It is well documented that African-American women with breast cancer are more likely to have a more aggressive type of the disease that kills them, but why remains a mystery. The answers may be found one day soon, as researchers focus more on the genetic makeup of cancer tumors and how African-American women may respond differently to treatment than women of other races. "There are two different tracks of research going on that could in the future help better treat African-American women with breast cancer ," said Rebecca McCoy, community health director of the advocacy group Komen Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2000
Dr. David Brandes, a Baltimore pathologist whose work in electron microscopy studying cancer cells led to a greater understanding of their structure and the effects of treatment on cellular growth, died Jan. 8 from complications during heart surgery at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 81. A longtime resident of Tudor Arms Apartments in Wyman Park, Dr. Brandes was associate chief pathologist at the old Baltimore City Hospitals, now Johns Hopkins Bayview, from 1965 until retiring in 1987.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | November 21, 2005
Dr. Elizabeth Jaffee gets six or seven e-mails a day from desperate cancer patients and family members, pleading for help or for a spot in one of her studies. The Johns Hopkins University researcher keeps two of these entreaties tacked to a wall in her office. One is from a 13-year-old Alaska boy whose father was dying of pancreatic cancer. The boy begs Jaffee for help: "You have to save my dad. He's my best friend." The other is from a 16-year-old Kansas girl who had already lost her mother to breast cancer.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
When a young woman is diagnosed with cancer, getting pregnant is probably the last thing on her mind. But if she wants children in the future, it's something she should think about. The chemotherapy and radiation treatments used to treat cancer can hurt a women's fertility. Nearly 10 percent of the 1.5 million diagnosed with cancer each year are of childbearing age, according to the National Cancer Institute, Dr. Melissa M. Yates, an assistant professor of gynecology and obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins Fertility Center, says these women need to think about fertility preservation before they begin treatment for cancer.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Evelyn David's mother, grandmother and great-grandmother all had breast cancer , so she knew there was a high likelihood that she would get the disease, too. But she never imagined it would strike so early. Last year, at age 31, David was enjoying the early years of marriage and looking forward to having kids. "I was still partying and doing my thing," said the federal police officer, who lives in Baltimore. "The farthest thing from my mind was breast cancer . I never thought it would happen at this time in my life.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.