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September 29, 2012
On Saturday, Oct. 6, TownMall of Westminster will host Paint TownMall Pink, an event aimed at raising awareness of breast cancer treatment and prevention. The event will take place at Center Court from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The organizations sponsoring and participating include Advanced Radiology, American Cancer Society, Beautiful Faces Permanent Makeup Salon, Carroll Homecare and Hospice, The Women's Place at Carroll Hospital Center, Carroll County Health Department and Carroll Regional Cancer Center.
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NEWS
October 3, 2014
Suicide prevention A Chesapeake Life Center symposium: "Life After a Suicide Loss," will be presented by author Eric Marcus of the American Foundation For Suicide Prevention from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 21 in the center, 90 Ritchie Highway, Pasadena. Marcus will moderate a panel discussion with a group of suicide loss survivors and mental health professionals. Registration online required at chesapeakelifecenter.org. Information: 410-987-2129. Cancer lecture Baltimore Washington Medical Center will sponsor a free lecture titled "Cancer Awareness: Knowing Your Risk," directed by Dr. Harvinder Singh, at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8 at the center's Leo & Lysbeth Courtney conference center, 8 t h floor, 301 Hospital Drive, Glen Burnie.
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NEWS
May 9, 2002
Joyce A. Warthen, a homemaker who was a cancer awareness advocate, died Saturday of melanoma at her Violetville home. She was 62. Born in Baltimore and raised in Violetville, Joyce A. McCarthy was a 1957 graduate of Southern High School. She worked for several years at Travelers Insurance Co., and later was a community volunteer. As an advocate for cancer awareness -- the disease was diagnosed in her four times -- Mrs. Warthen walked in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure and participated in cancer survivor activities at St. Agnes HealthCare.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Breast cancer gets a lot of attention - and not just during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. There's a good reason for that, as any of the quarter-million American women diagnosed with breast cancer each year will tell you. But breast cancer isn't the only serious health risk women should be aware of, according to county health professionals. Some are fatal; others are not. Some are well-known, others obscure. All affect the person's quality of life, and all affect more women than men. We talked with some Howard County doctors in the know to find out what to look out for and where to learn more locally.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 1999
ALICIA PETERSEN, 58, remembers her fear and confusion when her doctor told her she had breast cancer two years ago."I was by myself and didn't know what to do or what to think," she says. "The problem is that it's so overwhelming. You're going through this traumatic experience, but you have to maintain a sound, rational mind to find a good doctor and make decisions."Petersen's cancer was found during a routine mammogram. When she heard her diagnosis, Petersen says, she remembers thinking, "This could mean that I could die."
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,rona.marech@baltsun.com | October 30, 2008
The art bra contestants - on a mission to spread breast cancer awareness - did not mince words. A lady bug bra bears the message "Love your Ladies." A 9-year-old titled his bra, "Why I Need You, Mom," and another one, with eyes peeking out behind fingers, is called "Don't be Shy - Get Your Mammogram." "Kiss for a Cure" is covered in pink Hershey's kisses and a miniature Sherlock Holmes, pipe and magnifying glass grace "Early Detection: It's Elementary!" The artist behind "Boob Bunnies" wrote in a blurb, "I have lived 2041 days since my diagnosis of breast cancer and I am still very thankful to be alive."
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
Cancer is not a stranger to Pam Schweitzer's family. She and her brother survived colon cancer. A cousin and a sister-in-law have breast cancer. Another cousin died of the disease. But it took a little nudging from a friend to get her to enter a local breast cancer awareness contest calling for decorating plain white bras with fabric, paint, sequins and feathers. "My friend said, `This is right up your alley,'" said Schweitzer, 58, of Crofton. An avid and meticulous quilter, Schweitzer did not think she had enough time to create an entry with three weeks left before the Oct. 11 deadline.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun reporter | September 16, 2007
The first time Michael Sien of Eldersburg participated in a walk for breast cancer awareness five years ago, he noticed something that surprised him: very few men were among the walkers. At the time, he didn't even know anyone who had breast cancer, but he walked to support a cause that affects thousands of women - and more rarely, men - each year. "I started to think what could I do to make breast cancer and volunteering, in general, more on the radar for men," Sien said. Last year, Sien walked and crewed the National Philanthropy Trust's Breast Cancer 3-Day Walk in San Diego that supports Susan G. Komen For the Cure nationwide.
SPORTS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
Lance Armstrong won the Revolution 3 Half-Full Triathlon at Centennial Park in Howard County on Sunday, finishing the 70-mile race in just under 4 hours, 11 minutes. The effort by the famous cyclist and embattled seven-time Tour de France winner in the combined swimming, biking and running event, organized by the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults to raise money for cancer awareness, brought him in more than 18 minutes ahead of the second place finisher, Louis Therien of Quebec. Sharon Schmidt-Mongrain of Lafayette Hill, Pa., was the top female finisher in just under 4 hours, 54 minutes.
NEWS
By Blythe Bernhard and Blythe Bernhard,McClatchey-Tribune | October 20, 2006
Every October, products from tweezers to toothpaste get packaged in pink. They're all sold with the promise of promoting breast cancer awareness or benefiting breast cancer charities. Breast cancer has become the darling disease of corporate philanthropy - especially during national breast cancer awareness month. But are the pink promotions more about boosting corporate profits via female-friendly marketing? Although heart disease and lung cancer kill more women each year, experts say breast cancer is considered safer for companies to latch onto.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Roads around Hunt Valley will be closed Sunday morning because of the Susan G. Komen Maryland Race for the Cure, according to Baltimore County police. Road closures will begin at 6 a.m. with traffic delays expected in some spots until 11:30 a.m. Police recommend that drivers avoid the area during that period. The route is a loop on streets in the area immediately south of the Hunt Valley Towne Centre. The streets affected by closures include Shawan Road, York Road, McCormick Road, Schilling Road, Beaver Dam Road, Gilroy Road and Schilling Circle.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham | October 16, 2013
The Mercy soccer team is hosting its second breast cancer awareness soccer games against Institute of Notre Dame on Saturday to raise money and awareness. The event will get started at noon with the junior varsity game, followed by a Mercy alumni game and then the varsity game will take place at 3 p.m. There will be food and snowball trucks on hand and sports auction and donation tables also set up to support the cause. Those who attend are encouraged to wear pink to show support in the fight against breast cancer.
HEALTH
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Designers have gone pink once again this October in the name of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. We've gathered some of the more fashionable items so you can look stylish while contributing to organizations that aim to increase awareness of the disease and raise funds for research that will help prevent, treat and cure it. All of these finds are just a few clicks away online. Pop a polo This preppy polo is a subtle way of showing your support. A portion of the sale is directed to Polo Ralph Lauren Foundation's Pink Pony fund, which supports programs that help fight cancer and, in particular, reaches out to medically underserved communities.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Edmondson's football team will have its usual Monday conditioning session on Sunday this week, for a good cause. The Red Storm will race in the ZERO Prostate Cancer Run Sunday morning at 8:30 at Towson University. Coach Corey Johnson told the players they could have Monday off from conditioning if they participate in the fund-raising 5K scheduled for the last weekend of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Johnson said the idea originated with Edmondson principal Karl Perry Sr. after Dr. Sanford Siegel, the president and CEO of Chesapeake Urology, mentioned the race to him. “My principal thought it would be a great way to get the guys involved and also help to bring awareness,” Johnson said, adding that Siegel picked up the $30 entry fee for each of the Red Storm players and Perry provided a bus. “They wanted to bring awareness of prostate cancer particularly to the African American community,” Johnson said, “because it really affects African American men at a much higher rate than others.
NEWS
By Raffi Joe Wartanian | April 9, 2013
- A lazy Sunday morning. Arising later than usual. A long week of work in the books, a promising week ahead. Now living in Armenia, I correspond regularly with colleagues, friends and family back home in the States. Birds chirp as I check some emails and enter the social media labyrinth. And there I found them: farewell messages written to my friend, Anne Smedinghoff, 25, praising her brilliance, grace and kindness. She was delivering a truck full of books to schoolchildren when it happened.
HEALTH
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings will host a public cancer awareness forum Tuesday at the East Baltimore Medical Center to provide information and resources to patients, supporters and survivors. The 10:30 a.m. forum, "From Survive to Thrive: Equipping Cancer Patients to Live Their Best Lives," will feature experts including Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Secretary Joshua Sharfstein and Dr. Michelle Gourdine, author and former deputy secretary for Public Health Services at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | September 1, 2007
Estelle Marie Hynson, a cosmetologist who appeared at breast cancer awareness rallies as she fought her disease, died Monday at her Glen Burnie home. She was 66. Mrs. Hynson, who received the diagnosis five years ago, appeared as a breast cancer survivor during Susan G. Komen for the Cure breast cancer walks. Family members said she sported pink hair, a pink feather boa and a Panama hat trimmed in pink ribbon at last year's event in downtown Baltimore. She made the walk using a cane and later said she was proud of the busload of children, family members and friends who had accompanied her. "She wanted to fight until the end," said a son, David M. Hynson of Glen Burnie.
NEWS
June 29, 1999
Mary Brogan, 44, the wife of Florida Lt. Gov. Frank Brogan, died Sunday in Tallahassee of breast cancer.Mrs. Brogan worked recently to promote breast cancer awareness. She led a women's 5K race to benefit survivors and made calls of support to breast cancer patients.Pub Date: 6/29/99
EXPLORE
March 7, 2013
Harford Gymnastics, along with 2,600 other athletes from across the country, competed at the Pink Invitational in Philadelphia, Pa.., Feb. 22 to 24 to support Unite for Her and breast cancer awareness. Harford's Level 7 team shined, taking first place in a field of tough competitors. Additionally, Harford took second at Levels 6 and 8, third at Level 5 and fourth at Level 9. The entire Harford team (Levels 4 to 9) had 22 athletes score above 36 in all-around and four gymnasts tallied all-around scores above 37. A new club beam record was set at Level 7 and one of Harford's Level 9 athletes was recognized with the Strength of Character Award.
EXPLORE
March 5, 2013
March is observed across the nation as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Many survivors, patients, caregivers and others whose lives have been affected by colorectal cancer come together to generate awareness of the importance of getting screened and also encouraging loved ones to get screened. According to the American Cancer Society, excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women in the United States. In 2013, the American Cancer Society estimates 102,480 new cases of colon cancer and 40,340 new cases of rectal cancer will be reported.
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