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October 10, 2010
Hall of Fame outfielder Tony Gwynn is battling cancer of a salivary gland, according to an interview he gave to the San Diego Union-Tribune. Gwynn told the paper he has had surgery three times to remove tumors on the parotid, the largest of the salivary glands. He said procedures done in 1997 and three years ago were cancer-free, but a surgery performed last month revealed a malignancy. Gwynn told the paper that doctors removed three lymph nodes, and testing showed the cancer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
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FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | April 16, 1991
Michael Landon's good humor last week as he announced to the press in California that he has advanced pancreatic cancer was an exhibition of extraordinary grace in a difficult situation.In fact, the prognosis in most cases of cancer of the pancreas is not encouraging: The vast majority of pancreatic tumors are known as adenocarcinomas, which rarely cause symptoms until they have passed the point of no return.Cure is rare, and survival time is more often measured in months than in years, according to Dr. Richard Kaplan, associate professor of oncology and medicine at the University of Maryland Oncology Center.
FEATURES
By Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
After 13 years of experience in Maryland real estate, David Orso decided to use his skills to better equip those entering the housing market by writing a book. That this effort would also become a way to pay tribute to his wife was a heartbreaking coincidence. The book, "Step Inside: The Unfiltered Truth About Listing and Selling Your Home," reveals insider advice on finding the best agent, listing and pricing a home, roles of listing agents, and how to go from listed to sold smoothly.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 9, 2012
The American Cancer Society is launched a major, long-term prevention study across the country and is looking for people in the Baltimore area to participate. The society says 12 million people have survived cancer and many more have avoided it. This study could provide the information to keep others healthy. The study, much like the one that initially linked tobacco to cancer, will look at other genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors that may play into a person's risk of getting or preventing the disease.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2009
A Harford County restaurant manager is continuing his efforts to assist families coping with childhood cancer by holding a superhero event in Bel Air on Saturday. The Dominator, a character inspired by one child's battle with a brain tumor, will take part in an ice cream social and fundraiser from noon to 5 p.m. at Moore's Candies at 138 N. Bond St. Children will receive a free scoop of ice cream and visit with the red-suited superhero. Members of the Bel Air Volunteer Fire Company will be on hand at 3:30 p.m. with their mascot and several giveaways.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
“Rock Childhood Cancer” a benefit concert for 7-year-old Julia Warren, who has a rare, aggressive form of cancer, will be held at Bel Air Moose Lodge 1952 on Friday, July 26, at 7 p.m. There will be seven local bands appearing include Rezin, Wirehead, The Days, Off The Hook, Bound State, Roll it Over and Triangle. Julia is being treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. To date, she has undergone 15 rounds of chemotherapy and some 25 radiation treatments.  Tickets are $19.50.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Regarding "Cell phone use, tumors linked" (June 1), I am always amazed at what passes for news. Chances are that banning cell phones or other possible causes of cancer won't extend life. And there are far more dangerous endeavors we participate in. My advice is to relax, enjoy life and don't worry too much about the ills could befall us, because eventually one surely will. Michael W. Kohlman, Parkville,
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Towson University President Maravene Loeschke told faculty and staff Friday that she was recently diagnosed with cancer but expects to make a full recovery. Loeschke said the cancer, which is in her adrenal gland, was discovered at an early stage during a routine exam. She said she had surgery a few weeks ago and will undergo six weeks of radiation therapy to ensure the cancer does not spread. "I feel great and have no symptoms of any kind," Loeschke wrote in an email to faculty and staff members.
HEALTH
September 11, 2012
The federal government this week acknowledged a link between unhealthy conditions at ground zero in the  in the aftermath of the the Sept. 11 attacks and several types of cancer. It added 58 cancers to covered illnesses for people exposed to toxins at the site of the World Trade Center after the attacks 11 years ago today. Dr. John Howard, administrator of the World Trade Center Health Program, had originally proposed the additions in June. The recognition of the cancers will help get treatment for firefighters, medical personnel, survivors and others who worked on rescue efforts after the attacks.  The original list of conditions related to ground zero did not include cancers, but allowed for addition of other illnesses over time.  For information: www.cdc.gov/wtc or 1-888-982-4748 for information on how to apply.
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The double mastectomy took her breasts and the cancer they contained. Elissa Bantug was just 25. She was used to a satisfying, uncomplicated sex life with her live-in boyfriend, and she craved that intimacy as she looked ahead to her post-cancer life. Three days after the surgery, "grabbing at straws and wanting to feel normal," she gave her boyfriend, AJ, the come-hither look that had always worked in the past. This time, however, he balked, afraid of hurting her.  "We had a huge fight," recalled Bantug, now 33. Though she is now married to AJ and living in Columbia with their children, finding their way back to intimacy was a struggle.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
HEALTH
October 1, 2014
Think Pink Zumba Charity Event Zumba party to raise funds for two charities in Maryland assisting women battling with breast cancer : the Red Devils and Sisters Network Inc. Noon-2 p.m. Saturday at Downtown Cultural Arts Center, 401 N. Howard St., Baltimore. $10. the-red-devils.org Sweating for the Sisters Bokwa workout benefits the Tyanna Foundation. 9:30 am. Saturdays in October at Hard Rock Cafe Baltimore outdoor pier, 601 E. Pratt St. $10. tyanna.org/baltimore/events Equine Wine Festival Wine tasting and purchase, music, a food court, an outdoor horse arena with demonstrations, pony rides, horse-drawn wagon rides, artisans and more.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Breast cancer gets a lot of attention - and not just during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. There's a good reason for that, as any of the quarter-million American women diagnosed with breast cancer each year will tell you. But breast cancer isn't the only serious health risk women should be aware of, according to county health professionals. Some are fatal; others are not. Some are well-known, others obscure. All affect the person's quality of life, and all affect more women than men. We talked with some Howard County doctors in the know to find out what to look out for and where to learn more locally.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Orioles have already given Baltimore much to be proud of this week by clinching the American League East division title. Not as well known is another reason for Baltimore to be proud of this amazing organization - for the role that they are playing in the fight against lung cancer ( "Reflecting on memorable scenes from the Orioles' celebration Tuesday," Sept. 17). When Orioles Public Relations Director Monica Barlow died this February of lung cancer, she was only 36 years old. She had spent much of her four-and-a-half-year fight against lung cancer sharing her story in the hope of bringing attention to the critical need for research, some of which helped extend her own life.
NEWS
By Kaye Wise Whitehead | November 6, 2013
I hate losing. I hate it when I lose my keys, lose my way, or lose my train of thought. I have spent my life trying to learn the rules of every game that I played in an effort to ensure that I was always prepared and that I had everything that I needed to be victorious. The game always made sense to me when I knew the rules. I respected the boundaries and I fought hard. I am not accustomed to or comfortable with losing, and that is why I am having a difficult time. Earlier this year, my dear sweet mother-in-law passed away, less than three months after being diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer that had metastasized from her lungs to two places in her brain.
FEATURES
August 18, 2011
Evidence is mounting that dogs aren't just man's favorite companion -- they can also literally save our lives. Researchers in Germany have found that dogs, using just their power of scent, can detect cancer in 71 percent of patients. According to this report in the BBC , the findings build on earlier research into canine's ability to sniff out cancer. This type of research goes back to 1989, the story says, and scientists since have proven that dogs can find skin, bladder, bowel and breast cancers.
HEALTH
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
More than 1,000 people rode bicycles 150 miles - in the rain, for part of the way - this weekend to raise $2.6 million for cancer research at Johns Hopkins. The funds from the inaugural Ride to Conquer Cancer in Washington, D.C. on Saturday will support the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington and Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. Organizers said the money raised will allow researchers to personalize cancer treatment and screening methods for each patient.
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