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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 9, 2005
MADRID -- The Spanish government announced yesterday that Ante Gotovina, a top war crimes suspect from Croatia, had been arrested in Spain's Canary Islands, clearing a major obstacle to Croatia's efforts to join the European Union. Spain's Interior Ministry said Gotovina, 50, was arrested Wednesday night at a restaurant in a luxury hotel in Tenerife. The Croatian government had been criticized by European Union officials as failing to cooperate sufficiently in the search for Gotovina, who is a revered figure in parts of Croatia.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Otis M. "Jim" Long, a retired Maryland state trooper who survived the sinking of his aircraft carrier during World War II, died Thursday at Harbor Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 87. The son of Nathaniel O. Long and Vera M. Long, Otis Melrose Long, who was known as Jim, was born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in Richmond, Va. He was a student at John Marshall High School in Richmond, when he withdrew his senior year to enlist in the Navy. He later earned his General Education Development diploma.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2003
Scientists have long suspected a link between mass whale strandings and the Navy's use of powerful sonar systems, but the evidence - dying whales washing ashore when sonar exercises occur - has been mostly anecdotal. Now, international researchers have identified a disorder similar to decompression sickness, or the bends, as the cause of at least some whale beachings, and they say military sonar is most likely to blame. The new findings, being reported today in Nature, are based primarily on necropsies of 10 whales that stranded themselves in the Canary Islands during an international naval exercise last year that included a U.S. ship.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
June's full moon, known as the Strawberry Moon, coincides with the ominous timing of Friday the 13th this year. The moon will be full at precisely 12:11 a.m. Friday, so essentially on Thursday night, not Friday night. But it will still shine brightly on Friday, perhaps behind some storm clouds. The "strawberry" name comes from the fact that it's strawberry season, and Algonquin tribes knew this was the time of year to gather them, according to the Old Farmer's Almanac. It is also known as the Rose Moon and the Hot Moon, according to the almanac.
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008
The world's sexiest beaches from an annual listing by Concierge .com: 1. Kas, Turkey 2. Malibu, Calif. 3. Paros, Greece 4. Loreto, Mexico 5. Pemba Island, Tanzania 6. Providencia, Colombia (off the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua) 7. Lanzarote, Canary Islands 8. Oahu, Hawaii 9. St. Lucia 10. Perth, Australia
BUSINESS
By Craig R. Whitney and Craig R. Whitney,New York Times News Service | February 22, 1992
LONDON -- Lloyd's of London, the British underwriter of a $36 million accident insurance policy on Robert Maxwell, said yesterday that it did not intend to pay the policy because its investigators had concluded that he probably committed suicide.Mr. Maxwell's body was found floating in the Atlantic Ocean near the Canary Islands Nov. 5. At the time, his media and publishing empire was collapsing under a burden of debt and apparent fraud.He left an international business empire with more than $4 billion in debts.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
June's full moon, known as the Strawberry Moon, coincides with the ominous timing of Friday the 13th this year. The moon will be full at precisely 12:11 a.m. Friday, so essentially on Thursday night, not Friday night. But it will still shine brightly on Friday, perhaps behind some storm clouds. The "strawberry" name comes from the fact that it's strawberry season, and Algonquin tribes knew this was the time of year to gather them, according to the Old Farmer's Almanac. It is also known as the Rose Moon and the Hot Moon, according to the almanac.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and James Bock and Douglas Birch and James Bock,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
For Beatriz Lopez-Perez, who was born without arms, her new mechanical limbs are a testament to her faith.After almost two years of fittings and exhausting physical therapy at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the thalidomide victim, a native of Spain's Canary Islands, finally has received her prosthesis.In the meantime, she learned to speak English. She taught herself to live independently. She shrugged off the stares and buried her resentment at slights. And she labored to help a young man from Spain, a double-amputee, come to Hopkins for a new pair of arms of his own.Ms.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | May 2, 1992
MOSCOW -- The celebrators of workers' power who once streamed through Red Square in endless, banner-carrying lines on May Day returned yesterday in bitterness and small numbers.Too much has happened since last May 1. The march toward a workers' paradise has been halted. The nation has disintegrated. The once glorified Communist Party was disgraced.And yesterday the final indignity was reported. Viktor Tolmachev, worker, pensioner and courageous defender of the Motherland, marched to Red Square to praise the Communist cause.
TRAVEL
February 14, 1999
MY FAVORITE PLACEDiscovering the CanariesWhenever my wife, Betty, and I visit our daughter and her family in London, we make a point of looking over British travel catalogs. We have always been puzzled by the overwhelming coverage devoted to the Canary Islands. What gives? Here is a place it seems Americans never visit.When a little study revealed that the Canary Islands are Europe's favorite resort, with more than 6 million visitors a year and hundreds of hotels, we decided that on our next trip to London we would take a side trip to the Canaries.
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008
The world's sexiest beaches from an annual listing by Concierge .com: 1. Kas, Turkey 2. Malibu, Calif. 3. Paros, Greece 4. Loreto, Mexico 5. Pemba Island, Tanzania 6. Providencia, Colombia (off the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua) 7. Lanzarote, Canary Islands 8. Oahu, Hawaii 9. St. Lucia 10. Perth, Australia
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | April 26, 2008
Philip K. Morris, a retired commercial photographer who worked in space exploration in the 1960s, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at College Manor in Lutherville. The former Rodgers Forge resident was 93. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton, he attended St. Dominic's Parochial School. He dropped out of high school to help support his family during the Depression. He wanted an education and took evening vocational classes offered by city public schools in 1937. He joined his father and brothers at the Glenn L. Martin aircraft plant in Middle River.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 9, 2005
MADRID -- The Spanish government announced yesterday that Ante Gotovina, a top war crimes suspect from Croatia, had been arrested in Spain's Canary Islands, clearing a major obstacle to Croatia's efforts to join the European Union. Spain's Interior Ministry said Gotovina, 50, was arrested Wednesday night at a restaurant in a luxury hotel in Tenerife. The Croatian government had been criticized by European Union officials as failing to cooperate sufficiently in the search for Gotovina, who is a revered figure in parts of Croatia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2003
Scientists have long suspected a link between mass whale strandings and the Navy's use of powerful sonar systems, but the evidence - dying whales washing ashore when sonar exercises occur - has been mostly anecdotal. Now, international researchers have identified a disorder similar to decompression sickness, or the bends, as the cause of at least some whale beachings, and they say military sonar is most likely to blame. The new findings, being reported today in Nature, are based primarily on necropsies of 10 whales that stranded themselves in the Canary Islands during an international naval exercise last year that included a U.S. ship.
NEWS
By Alfred Lubrano and Alfred Lubrano,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 4, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Callers across America constantly phone the small house in Palmyra, N.J., eager to buy the services of a killer. Stirred and impressed by the 120-pound exotic dog that tore out a woman's throat in San Francisco last month, some people desire a canine assassin of their own. So they ring up Doug Logan, a Baptist minister and breeder of the rare Presa Canario, and ask him for a puppy with a potential for mayhem - price no object. "I must tell you the truth in Christ," says Logan, a gentle 30-year-old with an honest love for the rare kind of dog. "My phone is ringing off the hook with crackpots calling, looking for a killer to use for evil purposes.
SPORTS
By GILBERT LEWTHWAITE | November 2, 2000
Most serious sailors would question the sanity of going into blue water on any boat less than 40 feet long. So, choosing to race a sloop little more than half that length across an ocean might strike some old salts as madness. But little suggests anything but seriousness of purpose in Gale Browning, as she gears up for next year's Mini-Transat. It is a race for solo sailors on 21-foot sloops over 4,000 miles from France, via the Canary Islands, to Brazil. Browning, a certified marine surveyor in Annapolis and former delivery skipper, is inspired by legendary French single-handed ocean-racer Isabelle Autissier.
SPORTS
By GILBERT LEWTHWAITE | November 2, 2000
Most serious sailors would question the sanity of going into blue water on any boat less than 40 feet long. So, choosing to race a sloop little more than half that length across an ocean might strike some old salts as madness. But little suggests anything but seriousness of purpose in Gale Browning, as she gears up for next year's Mini-Transat. It is a race for solo sailors on 21-foot sloops over 4,000 miles from France, via the Canary Islands, to Brazil. Browning, a certified marine surveyor in Annapolis and former delivery skipper, is inspired by legendary French single-handed ocean-racer Isabelle Autissier.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Otis M. "Jim" Long, a retired Maryland state trooper who survived the sinking of his aircraft carrier during World War II, died Thursday at Harbor Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 87. The son of Nathaniel O. Long and Vera M. Long, Otis Melrose Long, who was known as Jim, was born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in Richmond, Va. He was a student at John Marshall High School in Richmond, when he withdrew his senior year to enlist in the Navy. He later earned his General Education Development diploma.
TRAVEL
February 14, 1999
MY FAVORITE PLACEDiscovering the CanariesWhenever my wife, Betty, and I visit our daughter and her family in London, we make a point of looking over British travel catalogs. We have always been puzzled by the overwhelming coverage devoted to the Canary Islands. What gives? Here is a place it seems Americans never visit.When a little study revealed that the Canary Islands are Europe's favorite resort, with more than 6 million visitors a year and hundreds of hotels, we decided that on our next trip to London we would take a side trip to the Canaries.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and James Bock and Douglas Birch and James Bock,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
For Beatriz Lopez-Perez, who was born without arms, her new mechanical limbs are a testament to her faith.After almost two years of fittings and exhausting physical therapy at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the thalidomide victim, a native of Spain's Canary Islands, finally has received her prosthesis.In the meantime, she learned to speak English. She taught herself to live independently. She shrugged off the stares and buried her resentment at slights. And she labored to help a young man from Spain, a double-amputee, come to Hopkins for a new pair of arms of his own.Ms.
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