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By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
CUMBERLAND -- In the foothills of the mountains rising alongside the mighty Potomac River, pioneering giants of American transportation once converged.Mule-drawn boats loaded with coal plied the waters of America's first canal. Steam engines chugged their way up the hills on the rails of America's first passenger lines. Stagecoaches, carriages and, eventually, cars made their way west on America's first national road.Now, this Western Maryland city of 25,000 is staking its future on re-creating the past, hoping to lure droves of tourists to relive its rich heritage as a hub of westward expansion.
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NEWS
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN REPORTER | May 11, 2006
CUMBERLAND -- Water will soon flow again in a section of the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal here, decades after the industrial age tromped through and the big trench was filled with dirt and vanished altogether. Progress lately marches in Teva sandals and Reeboks in a city hoping to lure tourists to the waterside. The brand name for this end of the historic 184 1/2 -mile C&O course is "Canal Place," the sort of urban reclamation project familiar to anyone who knows Camden Yards, Harborplace or Faneuil Hall.
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NEWS
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN REPORTER | May 11, 2006
CUMBERLAND -- Water will soon flow again in a section of the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal here, decades after the industrial age tromped through and the big trench was filled with dirt and vanished altogether. Progress lately marches in Teva sandals and Reeboks in a city hoping to lure tourists to the waterside. The brand name for this end of the historic 184 1/2 -mile C&O course is "Canal Place," the sort of urban reclamation project familiar to anyone who knows Camden Yards, Harborplace or Faneuil Hall.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
Republican Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett and his 6th District congressional challenger disagreed sharply in a televised debate over how best to fund new prescription drug coverage for seniors and on Bartlett's vote against a spending bill containing money for downtown Cumberland. Democrat Donald M. DeArmon sought to place Bartlett on the defensive in the 30-minute debate, which was taped Monday and aired last night on Maryland Public Television. DeArmon said the conservative, four-term incumbent opposed an appropriations measure containing money for Canal Place, a development project that includes a rail station and visitors center in Cumberland.
NEWS
April 28, 1996
KNOWN AS THE "Queen City," Cumberland once was a bustling mountain town of 38,000, the hub of westward expansion, first by way of the National Road, then the C&O Canal and finally the railroads. Industries flourished. Laborers flocked to town for the jobs. Tourists and businessmen kept hotels and resorts prosperous.No longer.Cumberland is a skid-row dowager with empty storefronts and long-vacant industrial plants. The jobs are gone and the town's isolation has discouraged new companies from coming.
NEWS
September 16, 1997
The Association of Independent Maryland Schools has scheduled a fair from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at the Glass Pavilion in Levering Hall at the Johns Hopkins University.Representatives from 35 private elementary and secondary schools will be available to answer questions and provide information. In addition, there will be sessions on how to choose the right school, how applicants are selected and how to afford private school tuition.* Information: 410-987-7025.CUMBERLAND -- Officials recently broke ground for the $1.3 million Wills Creek Esplanade at Canal Place, a downtown revitalization project pegged to Cumberland's transportation history.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
Republican Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett and his 6th District congressional challenger disagreed sharply in a televised debate over how best to fund new prescription drug coverage for seniors and on Bartlett's vote against a spending bill containing money for downtown Cumberland. Democrat Donald M. DeArmon sought to place Bartlett on the defensive in the 30-minute debate, which was taped Monday and aired last night on Maryland Public Television. DeArmon said the conservative, four-term incumbent opposed an appropriations measure containing money for Canal Place, a development project that includes a rail station and visitors center in Cumberland.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 20, 1994
Canal Place gets $325,000 boostCUMBERLAND -- The Appalachian Regional Commission gave a $325,000 boost yesterday to Canal Place, a new tourist attraction being developed around Cumberland's western terminus of the C&O Canal.The commission, meeting at the National Governors Association summer conference in Boston, tentatively approved the expenditure at the request of Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer.Administration officials said the money could be available within 60 days. It is to be used to design Canal Parkway, a thoroughfare extending south from Cumberland past the canal and to the area's regional airport across the Potomac River in West Virginia.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | October 2, 1994
In the Western Maryland mountains and in small towns along the Potomac River, they're talking about tourists -- throngs of people expected to come when apparently coincidental plans to refurbish portions of the historic Chesapeake & Ohio Canal are completed.The canal work and related projects carry a combined price exceeding $210 million in private and publicly financed efforts that will roughly double the "bricks and mortar" cost of building Oriole Park at Camden Yards.Cumberland in Allegany County and Williamsport, in neighboring Washington County, are the primary beneficiaries of the work, which has started in recent months and is expected to be completed over the next decade, bolstering Western Maryland as a tourist destination.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
FREDERICK -- Spending millions on new roads, schools and other services and then spending more millions to aid "depleted downtowns" makes no economic sense, Gov. Parris N. Glendening told planners, preservationists and others at an annual conference here yesterday.The governor made clear in a keynote address at the Historic Preservation and Economic Revitalization Conference at the Weinberg Center for the Arts that curtailing sprawl -- through revitalization of older areas and directed growth -- is a priority in his administration.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1999
CUMBERLAND -- A rare archaeological find has triggered an all-too-common scramble for cash by the National Park Service.Joseph Bilicki struck pay dirt this spring under a highway overpass when his backhoe uncovered large hunks of two 90-foot-long boats that were used to haul goods up and down the C&O Canal in the 1800s. He also found the remains of a large boatyard.The discovery raised the pulses of canal historians and preservationists who have been denied the opportunity to study one of the original mule-powered barges.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1997
For a few glorious hours every fall, Oakland, the sleepy seat of Maryland's westernmost county, relives its heyday as a destination for hundreds of train travelers.The grand hotels are long gone, but Oakland's ornate Victorian train depot still stands, and once a year welcomes passengers aboard a fall foliage excursion from Cumberland, host of the five-day Maryland RailFest."It's pretty exciting," Asa McCain, mayor of the picturesque burg Maryland's highlands, said of the yearly stopover in Oakland.
NEWS
September 16, 1997
The Association of Independent Maryland Schools has scheduled a fair from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at the Glass Pavilion in Levering Hall at the Johns Hopkins University.Representatives from 35 private elementary and secondary schools will be available to answer questions and provide information. In addition, there will be sessions on how to choose the right school, how applicants are selected and how to afford private school tuition.* Information: 410-987-7025.CUMBERLAND -- Officials recently broke ground for the $1.3 million Wills Creek Esplanade at Canal Place, a downtown revitalization project pegged to Cumberland's transportation history.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
Along a scenic and historic stretch of the Patapsco River Valley between Baltimore and Howard counties, a greenway trail is being planned that will take hikers back in time and help preserve the past.The area played a big role in economic development from pre-Colonial times through the Industrial Revolution and beyond.Ships brought cargo to Elk Ridge Landing and picked up tobacco, while riverside mills -- such as those at Ellicott City, Oella, Avalon and Daniels -- turned out products including flour, cotton and woolen goods for the growing country.
NEWS
April 28, 1996
KNOWN AS THE "Queen City," Cumberland once was a bustling mountain town of 38,000, the hub of westward expansion, first by way of the National Road, then the C&O Canal and finally the railroads. Industries flourished. Laborers flocked to town for the jobs. Tourists and businessmen kept hotels and resorts prosperous.No longer.Cumberland is a skid-row dowager with empty storefronts and long-vacant industrial plants. The jobs are gone and the town's isolation has discouraged new companies from coming.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
CUMBERLAND -- In the foothills of the mountains rising alongside the mighty Potomac River, pioneering giants of American transportation once converged.Mule-drawn boats loaded with coal plied the waters of America's first canal. Steam engines chugged their way up the hills on the rails of America's first passenger lines. Stagecoaches, carriages and, eventually, cars made their way west on America's first national road.Now, this Western Maryland city of 25,000 is staking its future on re-creating the past, hoping to lure droves of tourists to relive its rich heritage as a hub of westward expansion.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
Along a scenic and historic stretch of the Patapsco River Valley between Baltimore and Howard counties, a greenway trail is being planned that will take hikers back in time and help preserve the past.The area played a big role in economic development from pre-Colonial times through the Industrial Revolution and beyond.Ships brought cargo to Elk Ridge Landing and picked up tobacco, while riverside mills -- such as those at Ellicott City, Oella, Avalon and Daniels -- turned out products including flour, cotton and woolen goods for the growing country.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1999
CUMBERLAND -- A rare archaeological find has triggered an all-too-common scramble for cash by the National Park Service.Joseph Bilicki struck pay dirt this spring under a highway overpass when his backhoe uncovered large hunks of two 90-foot-long boats that were used to haul goods up and down the C&O Canal in the 1800s. He also found the remains of a large boatyard.The discovery raised the pulses of canal historians and preservationists who have been denied the opportunity to study one of the original mule-powered barges.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
FREDERICK -- Spending millions on new roads, schools and other services and then spending more millions to aid "depleted downtowns" makes no economic sense, Gov. Parris N. Glendening told planners, preservationists and others at an annual conference here yesterday.The governor made clear in a keynote address at the Historic Preservation and Economic Revitalization Conference at the Weinberg Center for the Arts that curtailing sprawl -- through revitalization of older areas and directed growth -- is a priority in his administration.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | October 2, 1994
In the Western Maryland mountains and in small towns along the Potomac River, they're talking about tourists -- throngs of people expected to come when apparently coincidental plans to refurbish portions of the historic Chesapeake & Ohio Canal are completed.The canal work and related projects carry a combined price exceeding $210 million in private and publicly financed efforts that will roughly double the "bricks and mortar" cost of building Oriole Park at Camden Yards.Cumberland in Allegany County and Williamsport, in neighboring Washington County, are the primary beneficiaries of the work, which has started in recent months and is expected to be completed over the next decade, bolstering Western Maryland as a tourist destination.
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