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By Tom Malone | February 12, 2010
S ince the snow and the Winter Olympics bring Canada to mind this week, and since folks have asked ... yes, we do get snows like this up north (and sometimes worse) - but not very often, especially with accelerating climate change in the last few decades. The big differences I'm noticing between the Canadian and Baltimorean snow experiences are, first, the government's ability to deal with it; and second, citizen reactions. First, the government. We pay higher taxes in Canada, and most of us don't mind.
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SPORTS
By Randy O'Donnell and New Brunswick Telegraph Journal | September 9, 2014
The Saint John Mill Rats have signed play-making guard Aquille Carr to a one-year contract. Carr's agent, Daniel Hazan, confirmed in a phone interview that the contract has been signed and the paperwork sent to the Mill Rats Tuesday afternoon. “Very excited about the program that Aquille is going to be part of and the team as a whole. I think this is going to be great for the city, it's going to be great for the organization and it's going to be amazing for him,” Hazan said.
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NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | May 29, 2012
During one of his stand-up routines, comedian and late-night host Jon Stewart told a joke that encapsulated the often misunderstood relationship between the United States and Canada. Said Mr. Stewart, "A Canadian came up to me and asked, 'What do Americans really think about Canada?' And I was like, 'We don't.'" Bingo. Joke, truth, and a growing problem, all spelled out in two words. In many ways, there is no country on Earth more important to the current and future welfare of the United States than Canada - and yet, many Americans and U.S. politicians barely give our neighbor to the north any thought at all. They should.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Carrie Evans, the executive director of Equality Maryland, was arrested at an immigration reform rally in Washington on Thursday afternoon, the state's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender organization said. The arrest wasn't surprising , as Evans had announced earlier this week that she planned to participate in a collective act of civil disobedience in front of the White House with marchers from Casa de Maryland and other social justice organizations. The event Thursday, which began in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters in Washington, was dubbed the #FightforFamilies march.
NEWS
By Tom Malone | February 12, 2010
Since the snow and the Winter Olympics bring Canada to mind this week, and since folks have asked ... yes, we do get snows like this up north (and sometimes worse) -- but not very often, especially with accelerating climate change in the last few decades. The big differences I'm noticing between the Canadian and Baltimorean snow experiences are, first, the government's ability to deal with it; and second, citizen reactions. First, the government. We pay higher taxes in Canada, and most of us don't mind.
NEWS
February 12, 2010
Congratulations to Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on her sudden but exciting promotion from City Council president to mayor of the great city of Baltimore. I think she will do an awesome job. I'm sorry she was "tossed into the deep end of the pool" head first, metaphorically speaking; however, she stepped up to the plate and took charge in organizing city resources to deal with two record-breaking snowstorms back-to-back. It has come to my attention that the city is having a problem with snow disposal ("So much snow and few places to put it," Feb. 10)
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 6, 2011
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are touring Canada this week, and I imagine it's slightly less exciting than when the Beatles came across the pond back in the day. On Tuesday, Prince William, with new bride Kate Middleton standing on the sidelines, picked up a stick and challenged a 20-year-old Canadian goalie to a street hockey shootout. He was as bad at hockey as you would expect a British prince to be. [ Via Deadspin ]
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | December 22, 2011
In a victory for common sense, America's top trading partner has become the first country to bail on the Kyoto Protocol before the nearly $7 billion in noncompliance costs comes due next year. Thus ends a pointless and pricey exercise in martyrdom. Having committed to reducing 1990-level carbon emissions by 6 percent, Canada somehow managed to go in the other direction by about a third. Not that anyone in Canada would have noticed by any tangible common-sense measure, except perhaps for all the Canadian plants and trees quietly cheering the abundance of carbon dioxide and overproducing fresh oxygen as a result.
NEWS
By Martin W. G. King | December 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Somewhat like Nero, Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien appears to fiddle as his country goes up in flames. His laggardly response to French-speaking Quebec's continuing threat to secede from the 128-year old Canadian confederation may do more than backfire. It may hasten the demise of a country that Americans have long taken for granted because of all the things it now is not: stable, militarily dependable, credit-worthy and prosperous. Before the end of this century, Canada could start spinning off its provinces one by one.Canada is this country's largest trading partner and its closest military ally.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 1, 1998
I SAY IT'S TIME our "leaders" in Washington stopped blathering about sex and started paying attention to the issues that really matter to this nation, such as whether we should declare war on Canada.I say: yes. I base this position on a shocking document that I have obtained via a conduit that I will identify here, for reasons of confidentiality, only as "the U.S. Postal Service." Here is a direct quote from this document:"Step One: Before inflating Passionate Pam, be sure to smear plenty of ..."
SPORTS
By John Jiloty and Inside Lacrosse | July 19, 2014
COMMERCE CITY, Colo. - The consensus among fans and analysts heading into Saturday's Federation of International Lacrosse World Championship final between Canada and the United states was that the Americans, dominant all tournament long, were the clear-cut favorites.  Canada, seeking its first gold since 2006, needed to win faceoffs and control possession to keep the ball away from Team USA's stacked offense, which came into the championship game...
SPORTS
By Terry Foy and Inside Lacrosse | July 19, 2014
When the Canada and U.S. tangle at 9 tonight, they'll reignite a rivalry that offers pretty much everything a sports fan could want -  history, excitement, emotion and incredibly high stakes. When these two teams opened the FIL World Championships on July 10 in Commerce City, Colo., Canada jumped out to a 3-0 lead while holding the U.S. scoreless for the game's first 25 minutes. An eight-goal outburst over the next 20 minutes created separation from which the Canadians couldn't rebound.
SPORTS
By John Jiloty and Inside Lacrosse | July 18, 2014
The U.S. team pretty quickly threw out any concerns about a letdown game in the semifinals of the Federation of International Lacrosse World Championships on Thursday night in Commerce City, Colo. Team USA, coming off a dominant 18-5 win over the Iroquois Nation on Tuesday night, easily could have looked past an Australia team it beat, 16-7, in pool play. Instead, the United States jumped out to a 7-0, first-quarter lead on the Aussies and never slowed, winning, 22-3, at Dick's Sporting Goods Park to advance to Saturday night's gold-medal game against Canada for the fifth straight time.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 17, 2014
FIL World Championships Australia edges Israel, 9-8, will face U.S. in semifinal Goalie Tom Vickery stopped shots by Matthew Cherry with five seconds left and Cody Levine earlier in the final minute to preserve Australia's 9-8 victory over Israel in a quarterfinal at the Federation of International Lacrosse World Championships on Wednesday night in Commerce City, Colo. Australia will play the top-seeded United States tonight at 6:30. Australia defenseman Callum Robinson , a rising junior at Stevenson, knocked down a shot during the final sequence.
SPORTS
From Inside Lacrosse | July 17, 2014
1. Matt Abbott is the U.S. team's most important player One of the strongest reactions to the U.S. team's 23-man roster was the lack of a third short-stick defensive midfielder, and that criticism was exacerbated by  injuries to Dan Burns and Kyle Harrison in pool play . What it also shone a bright spotlight on is how consistent and reliable Matt Abbott is as a player. So many times, he's come in off the wings of a faceoff to make a tough ground ball look easy or pulled out of a so-so transition opportunity to calmly flip the ball to an on-subbing midfielder.
SPORTS
By John Jiloty and Inside Lacrosse | July 10, 2014
Coming into the Federation of International Lacrosse World Championships, Team USA didn't display many holes, with a star-studded roster coached by a deep and talented staff. The reigning gold medalist from the 2010 world games, the U.S. team opened this year's event with a dominant 10-7 win over archrival Canada at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City, Colo. Midfielder Paul Rabil (Johns Hopkins) led the U.S. with two goals and two assists, while Rob Pannell and Kevin Buchanan (Calvert Hall)
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | July 24, 2010
A four-year long rebuilding project by the U.S. men's national team culminated Saturday in a 12-10 victory over Canada -- the team that dethroned it in 2006 -- in the Federation of International Lacrosse world championship (FIL) World Championship final before an announced 4,651. "We dreamed of this. This was our destiny," Team USA coach Mike Pressler said. "The script was written. We just had to go out there and prove it." Team USA's seventh world title did not come easily.
SPORTS
By Randy O'Donnell and New Brunswick Telegraph Journal | September 9, 2014
The Saint John Mill Rats have signed play-making guard Aquille Carr to a one-year contract. Carr's agent, Daniel Hazan, confirmed in a phone interview that the contract has been signed and the paperwork sent to the Mill Rats Tuesday afternoon. “Very excited about the program that Aquille is going to be part of and the team as a whole. I think this is going to be great for the city, it's going to be great for the organization and it's going to be amazing for him,” Hazan said.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
For proof of the expanding reach of lacrosse around the globe, look no further than the Federation of International Lacrosse World Championships, which begin Thursday night in the Denver suburbs. A record 38 teams, representing nations from six continents, will take part in the quadrennial event over the next 10 days at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City. That's an impressive number for an event that began with only four countries in 1967 and had just six as recently as 1994.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
To make way for renovations at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, Air Canada operations will permanently shift terminals starting Tuesday morning. Running four round-trip flights a day from Baltimore to Toronto, Air Canada will move from the International Terminal to Concourse D, with flights running out of Gate D7. Ticket transactions will be done on the upper level of that terminal. Airport spokesman Jonathan Dean said the change is part of a plan to improve Concourse D and E, a project now in the design phase that is expected to take several years and cost about $125 million to complete.
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