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By The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
The Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County is closed Monday due to a power outage in some buildings. According to the college's web site, all day classes at CCBC Catonsville are canceled, and a separate decision will be made later for evening classes. Classified staffers do not need to report. Faculty and administrators may report, but Buildings B, D, E, J, K. L and R do not have power. All other CCBC campuses and extension centers are open as usual.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
The president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore campus said he is "deeply disturbed" by two crimes reported against members of the campus community Monday night and will hold a public safety town hall next week. The incidents -- a robbery of a nursing student and an attempted robbery of a hospital employee -- have prompted campus police to add additional police and security officers, who will wear reflective vests on foot or on Segways, President Jay A. Perman said in an e-mail to employees and students.
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NEWS
June 13, 1994
Joe Camel's nicotine is not the only threat to young people's health; alcohol is also a perennial competitor in this category. That point is driven home in a new report from a blue-ribbon panel that points to a "startling" increase in binge drinking on college campuses. That's bad news for health and bad news for education: Drinking contributes to a range of physical -- and academic -- problems.The study reports that 40 percent of students with academic problems drink too much and that alcohol is a factor in 28 percent of drop-out cases.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 4, 2014
College freshmen are completing their first month on campus. According to the website  The Other Freshman 15 , "The first 15 weeks of college can be the riskiest for sexual assault. ... One out of five students experience rape or sexual assault while they are in college, and in the great majority of cases (75-80 percent), the victim knows the attacker. " The  Washington Post  recently carried a front-page story about campus sexual assaults. As the father of former college students, two of whom are daughters, I was stunned by the presumptions in the story.
NEWS
October 19, 1990
If other state officials were as aggressive as Towson State's President Hoke L. Smith in coming to grips with Maryland's pending budget deficit (which could run as high as $400 million), the Schaefer administration would have a far easier time reducing government spending. Dr. Smith is taking the prudent and conservative view that times are bound to get tougher and that the sooner budgetary reductions are made at Towson State, the easier it will be over the long haul.That's why Dr. Smith not only embraced the governor's order to curb expenses by 6 percent but went one step beyond, lopping off 12 percent.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau | February 29, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A House of Delegates committee yesterday easily approved a proposal to merge the University of Maryland's Baltimore City and County campuses.The bill now goes to the full House, but it's expected to face its real test in the Senate, where Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. is opposed to the plan.The combined Baltimore campuses would have about 15,000 students, less than half College Park's enrollment of 35,000. The governor envisions the merged institutions as a specialized center for the study of life sciences and medicine.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- Far fewer black and Hispanic students will enroll as freshmen at the University of California's most prestigious schools this fall, although their numbers will drop only slightly throughout the state system and some campuses will experience an increase, officials said yesterday.The freshmen class of 1998 is the first to be admitted since California banned consideration of race in college admissions in 1996.The release of the new figures comes seven weeks after an announcement that minority applications at Berkeley and Los Angeles had dropped sharply.
NEWS
By WILLIAM G. ROTHSTEIN | January 6, 1993
The actions of the Board of Regents eliminating programs a campuses of the University of Maryland show so little knowledge of higher education, so little attention to facts, and so blatant a disregard of the board's own policies that they pose a great danger to one of Maryland's most valuable resources.Clearly some programs on all campuses should be cut, and some of the cuts were obvious and appropriate. However, the report contains no evidence to justify any of the cuts and many cuts were incomprehensible.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 16, 1990
AT THE UNIVERSITY of Texas in Austin, as on campuses across the country, freshmen are hooking up their stereos and buckling down to the business of learning what they should have learned in high school -- particularly English composition. Thousands of young Texans will take English 306, the only required course on composition. The simmering controversy about that course illustrates the political tensions that complicate, dilute and sometimes defeat higher education today.Last summer an attempt was made to give a uniform political topic and text to all sections of E306.
NEWS
By Steve Glickman and Sarah Elfreth | October 23, 2009
Today, with the Maryland Board of Regents discussing a first-in-the-nation policy regulating entertainment events on its 13 campuses, we are proud to say that students have stood up and said: "No policy." As the student representative on the Board of Regents and the student body president of the University System of Maryland's flagship university in College Park, we don't support porn. Rather, we support the right of students and student groups to host entertainment events on their campuses without the fear of censorship by a university administrator or a state politician.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Towson University police are investigating several off-campus, early morning robberies in the past two weeks. In three incidents since Sept. 7 police said victims were walking to or from apartment buildings when they were approached. In one on Sept. 11, in the 6300 block of York Road, north of Walker Avenue, the suspects were armed with handguns and knives. Two other cases, about a block away, in the 500 block of Castle Dr., on Sept. 7 and 16, police say suspects used physical force.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
A female student at Towson University died Saturday night at an off-campus residence, a university spokeswoman said. The university did not immediately identify the student or the circumstances of her death. University spokeswoman Gay Pinder said the cause of death was not violence, but she declined to elaborate. Towson officials have been in touch with the family, who live out-of-state, Pinder said. She did not say where the student was from. Baltimore County Police and Fire departments said they had not fielded any calls related to the incident and were not handling the investigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
John Hopkins University will bring four authors to campus this season who combine critical acclaim and popular appeal. The second annual President's Reading Series kicks off Sept. 23 with Canadian author Lawrence Hill, who recently completed writing a television miniseries adaptation of his 2007 novel, "The Book of Negroes. " (It was released in the U.S. under the title, "Someone Knows My Name. ") Booker Award-winning novelist, poet and short-story writer Alan Hollinghurst visits the campus on Oct. 21; the Sarajevo-born novelist Aleksandar Hemon, winner of a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant will read from his work on March 31, and Zadie Smith, win of the Orange Prize For Fiction, will speak on April 28. All readings are free and open to the public.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
While the Obama administration presses colleges and universities to respond more aggressively to sexual assaults, students who are attacked at Baltimore-area schools are unable to get rape kit exams on their campuses. Instead, they must go to a hospital off-campus - an extra step that advocates for victims say deters at least some from reporting the crime. The question whether schools should offer the exams is the subject of a national debate that is dividing school administrators, nurse examiners and advocates - with victims falling on both sides.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
The new superintendent of the Naval Academy said Thursday that the institution is a national leader in confronting sexual assault and sexual harassment among students, and should be helping other schools tackle what he described as a widespread problem. The Naval Academy has drawn national attention for the alleged assault of a female midshipman at a party in Annapolis and the subsequent investigation of three members of the Navy football team. The prosecution came amid a growing public focus on sexual assaults both in the military and on college campuses.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
John W. Dorsey, former chancellor of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who later returned to the classroom where he taught economics, died Monday of respiratory failure at his Laurel home. He was 78. "Many believe that he saved UMBC from several alternative fates, from absorption to closure, and set it onto the sound course that leads to today," said Joseph N. Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history at UMBC and director of the university's human context of science and technology program.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | June 29, 1991
A state panel is expected to tell Gov. William Donald Schaefer Monday to stop frittering away higher education money all over the state and concentrate it where many agree that dollars will lead to national prestige and quality instruction.Specifically, the Maryland Higher Education Commission says the University of Maryland at College Park is too bruised to take any more budget cuts, and it should be "held harmless" in the next round.The enhancement of College Park is a key goal of the 1988 legislation establishing the 11-campus state university system, but deep budget cuts have left the campus rationing paper and struggling to hang on to star faculty.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 6, 2004
BOSTON - I like the old maxim that academic politics are so vicious because the stakes are so small. How else to explain the intramural conflicts that erupt over such searing campus issues as tenure and parking? But now it seems there's an extramural furor over politics itself. Conservatives have long regarded universities as the last spider holes of liberalism. They regard professors as lefty holdouts who spend their days indoctrinating the younger generation on the virtues of Che Guevara.
SPORTS
By Aaron Dodson, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Former Maryland women's basketball player Sequoia Austin, who's spent the summer working basketball camps in College Park, joked with one of her co-workers Tuesday morning at a certain sight. "Somebody I work with had an ACC basketball lanyard and we were like, 'This is retro now,'" the 22-year-old Austin said. "We need to update, get with the times. " On Tuesday, Maryland officially became a member of the Big Ten Conference nearly two years after announcing that the school would leave the Atlantic Coast Conference.
NEWS
By Wallace D. Loh | June 30, 2014
Tuesday, the University of Maryland officially joins the Big Ten athletic conference. This is a winning moment for both athletics and academics at Maryland. In stadiums, arenas and on the Big Ten Network, new and challenging match-ups will excite Maryland players, fans and supporters. The Terps will compete at the highest level when they play against Ohio State's Buckeyes, Michigan's Wolverines, Penn State's Nittany Lions and other Big Ten teams. We will welcome to Maryland and to the Baltimore-Washington corridor the thousands of Big Ten fans who travel with their teams, as well as the tens of thousands of Big Ten alumni who already live in the area.
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