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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
A homeless man was found dead in a makeshift shelter near an ramp for I-695 in Anne Arundel County on Thursday, authorities said. The man was identified by police as Martin Gene Triplett, 61. His son told Anne Arundel County police that Triplett had lived for three years at the camp, in the woods near Camp Meade Road's ramp to westbound I-695 in Linthicum Heights. The son visited his father weekly, bringing food and supplies to the makeshift campsite, police said. He found his father on Thursday evening during one of these visits and called police.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
A homeless man was found dead in a makeshift shelter near an ramp for I-695 in Anne Arundel County on Thursday, authorities said. The man was identified by police as Martin Gene Triplett, 61. His son told Anne Arundel County police that Triplett had lived for three years at the camp, in the woods near Camp Meade Road's ramp to westbound I-695 in Linthicum Heights. The son visited his father weekly, bringing food and supplies to the makeshift campsite, police said. He found his father on Thursday evening during one of these visits and called police.
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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | April 9, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The Court of Special Appeals today gave the Maryland attorney general permission to seek refunds for some of the 43,000 state residents who were lured to a Pennsylvania campsite by deceptive notices they received by mail.The decision gives the attorney general's consumer protection division authority to seek refunds from Outdoor World Corp. for state residents who traveled to Pennsylvania and Virginia after receiving the deceptive notices.The mailings promised free prizes -- ranging from $10,000 in cash to new automobiles -- to smaller prizes to recipients who traveled to the sites to claim their prizes.
TRAVEL
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
IF CAMPING REMINDS YOU OF a bad night's sleep and mosquitoes, well, you have a good memory. But the plus side to a $500 weekend with a tent is that the budget leaves plenty of cash for adventure. The three-day trip with my husband, David, included surfing lessons, a fishing tournament and meals that were anything but freeze-dried. And we suffered zero mosquito bites, even though the place we pitched our tent is known for them in the summer. Assateague is essentially a giant sand bar. The 37-mile-long barrier island is so narrow in places you could kick a soccer ball across it. The Eastern Shore destination is known for wild ponies and sandy campsites.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 18, 1999
In Maryland Health agency tells doctors to watch for Pfiesteria signs A federal health agency has told the nation's doctors to watch for problems that could be associated with Pfiesteria piscicida, the microorganism blamed for making some Eastern Shore watermen and boaters ill two years ago. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published its alert, similar to one issued last spring, because the approach of warm summer weather...
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
Do you know someone who wants to get married?Laura Gomoljak of Arnold had an answer to the question written on a sign posted along the wooded road in the Ramblin' Pines Campgrounds in Woodbine. She'd had an answer to that question for the past two years.While riding to the campsite with her boyfriend, Bill Moxley, Ms. Gomoljak continued to read the handmade signs.Roses are red, violets are blue, when he pops the big question, will she say "I do?"Come one, come all, witness the big question . . .Will You Marry Me?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2004
COMING UP Spend the weekend stomping on grapes at Fiore Winery's 15th annual wine festival. Thousands attend every year to sample wine, listen to live jazz, tour the vineyard, eat food from different vendors and, of course, soak up wine-making skills, said vintner Mike Fiore (pictured). The grape-stomping is a contest, and participants are judged on technique, style and originality. The vineyard doesn't provide any instruction for this task, so we recommend boning up with I Love Lucy reruns.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | March 10, 1992
Glenda Meads hopes the consumer protection arm of Maryland law is long enough to stretch across state lines and grab a bit of vengeance for the mental torture she says she suffered at the hands of fast-talking campsite salesmen.Mrs. Meads of Columbia is one of 5,000 Marylanders who signed agreements to buy campsites in Pennsylvania and Virginia after being lured to the places by promotional brochures from Outdoor World, a resort company in Bushkill, Pa., and then forced to take tours and listen to hours of sales pitches.
FEATURES
By Sheila Toomey and Sheila Toomey,McClatchy News Service | July 19, 1992
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- The scent and sizzle of country sausage drifted across the late afternoon as clouds moved in on the Chugach foothills off in the distance. Irma Meisner from Rifle, Colo., cooked dinner while, a dozen campsites down the line, Al Krueger from Shawano, Wis., whittled away the day, stripping bark from a diamond willow destined to become a lamp.A typical recreational vehicle camp scene, filled with typical summer visitors to Alaska -- except it was all happening on a huge vacant lot behind Dimond Center along one of the busiest streets in Anchorage.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
To the surprise of archaeologists, American Indians were trashing the Millersville Landfill nearly 6,000 years ago.Anne Arundel County's prehistoric inhabitants apparently camped, hunted and fashioned tools along a small stream that once ran through what has become the county's largest trash facility.However, all they left behind was trash of their own."Typically, archaeologists only find what prehistoric people threw away," said Amy Friedlander, a project manager for a team of archaeologists who unearthed the prehistoric campsite at Millersville this spring.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
WYE ISLAND-- --Directionally, Fran Gower's pineapple upside-down cake is a success. Aesthetically, however, it's four rings shy of dessert. Not to worry, says Gower, as she scurries around the campfire from the Dutch oven to her portable pantry sitting near a stump. With a quick twist of a can opener and a few pokes with a fork, Gower replaces the charred pineapple rings with unblemished ones. If the 11 guests at her camp site - fresh from a kayaking trip - know about the touch-up job, they never let on. And that, says Gower with a smile, is what camp cooking is all about.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2004
COMING UP Spend the weekend stomping on grapes at Fiore Winery's 15th annual wine festival. Thousands attend every year to sample wine, listen to live jazz, tour the vineyard, eat food from different vendors and, of course, soak up wine-making skills, said vintner Mike Fiore (pictured). The grape-stomping is a contest, and participants are judged on technique, style and originality. The vineyard doesn't provide any instruction for this task, so we recommend boning up with I Love Lucy reruns.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
BOB WALL is too careful a scientist to say he's on the verge of a sensational discovery. He makes no claims beyond what he can support with hard data. But the Allegany County soybean field where the Towson University archaeologist has been digging for more than a decade is tossing up hints that someone camped there, on the banks of the Potomac River, as early as 16,000 years ago. If further digging and carbon dating confirm it, Wall's field could be one of the oldest and most important archaeological sites in the Americas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | June 20, 1999
HARPERS FERRY, W. Va. -- Larry Luxenberg thinks it's a shame people can't see Emma Gatewood's shower curtain. Or Gene Espy's 40-year-old wool socks.For Luxenberg, an author, New York financial adviser and passionate hiker, these everyday items are sacred icons of the sport he loves. He wants to display them and other historic hiking artifacts in a museum near the Appalachian Trail Conference headquarters in this historic town.Such a museum, he says, would honor people like Gatewood and Espy, who found pleasure in putting one foot in front of the other, and, perhaps, inspire folks who believe the great outdoors is the space between their car and the office to, well, take a hike.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 18, 1999
In Maryland Health agency tells doctors to watch for Pfiesteria signs A federal health agency has told the nation's doctors to watch for problems that could be associated with Pfiesteria piscicida, the microorganism blamed for making some Eastern Shore watermen and boaters ill two years ago. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published its alert, similar to one issued last spring, because the approach of warm summer weather...
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1999
Some 2,000 campsites, cabins and picnic shelters in Maryland's state forests and parks can be rented up to a year in advance through a new telephone reservation system administered by the Department of Natural Resources.The State Forest and Park Service estimates more than 10 million people use its 35 family or youth camping facilities each year.The telephone reservation service (888-432-2267) is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week."Warmer temperatures are just around the corner, and we encourage all Marylanders to discover the beauty of our natural resources," DNR secretary John R. Griffin said when the service was activated earlier this month.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1999
Some 2,000 campsites, cabins and picnic shelters in Maryland's state forests and parks can be rented up to a year in advance through a new telephone reservation system administered by the Department of Natural Resources.The State Forest and Park Service estimates more than 10 million people use its 35 family or youth camping facilities each year.The telephone reservation service (888-432-2267) is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week."Warmer temperatures are just around the corner, and we encourage all Marylanders to discover the beauty of our natural resources," DNR secretary John R. Griffin said when the service was activated earlier this month.
FEATURES
By Lisa Skolnik and Lisa Skolnik,Chicago Tribune | July 30, 1998
Bored with your bedtime routine? You know the drill: You go to sleep in the same room, same bed and same PJs at the same time night after night.Now that it's warm outside, shake up the routine and go backyard camping all alone (we mean no parents; buds are a must). We recently had a few thrills, a few chills and best of all, lots of frills on our own backyard campout. Seven kids slept in the backyard on a balmy June night. Here's the low-down:The thrills: The fresh air was excellent, the extra company was outstanding and it was a blast to tell scary stories, stay up late and act silly.
FEATURES
By Lisa Skolnik and Lisa Skolnik,Chicago Tribune | July 30, 1998
Bored with your bedtime routine? You know the drill: You go to sleep in the same room, same bed and same PJs at the same time night after night.Now that it's warm outside, shake up the routine and go backyard camping all alone (we mean no parents; buds are a must). We recently had a few thrills, a few chills and best of all, lots of frills on our own backyard campout. Seven kids slept in the backyard on a balmy June night. Here's the low-down:The thrills: The fresh air was excellent, the extra company was outstanding and it was a blast to tell scary stories, stay up late and act silly.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 1998
EAGAR, Ariz. -- Down a dusty, rocky trail and through a knot of pine trees, past a naked guy chewing leaves, a fully clothed Christian choir and a retired Jewish pie thrower, is the meadow where the Rainbow Family is holding its 27th annual gathering to party and pray for peace.As many as 14,000 members of this family of old hippies and young converts, of blacks and whites, of American Indians and recent immigrants, of babies and grandparents have come from across the country to the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest, just west of this two-stoplight town near the New Mexico border, for an annual gathering that lasts for about three weeks.
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