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By Ann McArthur and Ann McArthur,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
On a frigid Friday afternoon in the lobby of a fancy hotel in Washington, Campbell Scott arrived to promote Off the Map, dressed casually in gray corduroy pants, carrying just a black backpack. The actor, director and producer -- who directed the film, which opens tomorrow -- had no entourage and wasn't approached by autograph-seekers. But that's the way he likes it. "I don't have the energy for fame," said Scott, 43. Despite making his big-screen debut in The Sheltering Sky and capturing breakout roles in Longtime Companion, and Hollywood vehicles Dying Young and Cameron Crowe's Singles, Scott prefers staying off Hollywood's radar and spending his efforts working on independent films.
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NEWS
October 6, 2006
On October 3, 2006, SCOTT M. CAMPBELL; beloved son of Stanley and Lorraine Pugaczewski; loving brother of John Campbell and his wife Lisa and Pete Campbell and his wife Michelle; also survived by loving nieces and nephews; beloved friend of Priscilla Blair. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME OF BEL AIR INC., 610 MacPhail Road (at Route 24) on Thursday and Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A funeral service will be held at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church on Saturday at 9:30 A.M. Interment will be at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church Cemetery.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | June 20, 1991
* ''Dying Young'' Julia Roberts is a young woman who becomes live-in caretaker of a young man who is ill. Campbell Scott is the shut-in who is dominated by his father.* ''The Rocketeer'' It is 1938 and a pilot finds a rocket pack that allows him to fly. Interested in gaining possession of the pack are the Nazis, who are represented in Hollywood by an actor who is meant to suggest Errol Flynn. Timothy Dalton, Jennifer Connelly and Bill Campbell star.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
Carroll Ballard's movies don't cast spells. They are spells. They transport audiences, body and soul, to fierce, beautiful realms: the desert island of The Black Stallion (1979), the sub-Arctic expanse of Never Cry Wolf (1983), the geese-filled Canadian skies of Fly Away Home (1996). It's critics, not studio heads, who should bear some animus toward Ballard. His films frustrate anyone trying to analyze the alchemy behind them. But it's studio heads who've made finding Ballard's marvels a problem.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 2005
The people are just a little too calculatedly quirky in Off the Map, an otherwise engaging comedy from actor-director Campbell Scott about a free-spirited family of desert nomads eking out a deceptively alluring living in late-'60s New Mexico. Joan Allen, showing off the comedic chops displayed to even better effect in The Upside of Anger (also now in theaters) is Arlene Groden, a deceptively well-grounded earth mother surrounded by baskets and near-basket cases. She's the only one in the film who really shouldn't be called quirky, although she does enjoy standing out in her garden naked.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 18, 1992
Whoever said youth is too precious to be wasted on the young didn't really get it right; on the basis of "Singles" it would appear that depression, anomie, self-loathing and fear are entirely too precious to be wasted on the young -- they simply don't know how to enjoy them yet."Singles" examines the lives of a set of young men and women in Seattle, Wash., evidently a bastion of counterculture values in the far Northwest. Not only is it wet and rainy there, it's still the '60s.The setting isn't exactly a commune, but almost: It's an apartment building, each of whose units has been rented by a twentysomething yearner after happiness.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 3, 2003
The studios see the movie year as a circus held up by tent poles - "franchise" pictures like the Mummy spin-offs or the Bond films. But even if it's as jam-packed with good things as 2002 was, the movie year for most cities is more like a hammock - it begins and ends strongly, but sags badly in between. The relatively few Hollywood-financed films that even aim for artistic quality - along with foreign or independent films with Oscars in their eyes - open in New York and Los Angeles first, usually in the fall, then spread to the rest of the country over the course of months.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
Carroll Ballard's movies don't cast spells. They are spells. They transport audiences, body and soul, to fierce, beautiful realms: the desert island of The Black Stallion (1979), the sub-Arctic expanse of Never Cry Wolf (1983), the geese-filled Canadian skies of Fly Away Home (1996). It's critics, not studio heads, who should bear some animus toward Ballard. His films frustrate anyone trying to analyze the alchemy behind them. But it's studio heads who've made finding Ballard's marvels a problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 5, 2005
Art theaters and film festivals can be great for dates. Couples put their coffee down and snuggled closer as they watched Ingrid Bergman pitch the woo to Cary Grant in Notorious when the Maryland Film Festival showed Hitchcock's classic at the Charles two years ago, with Margaret Carlson hosting. Art theaters and film festivals can also be great for the raunchy group catharses most often associated with comedy clubs. Festival-goers who attend John Waters' hilarious, heartfelt explications of terrible movies about extreme behavior know how fun or exciting it can be to break taboos en masse (if not as conducive as Notorious to back-row necking and petting)
NEWS
October 6, 2006
On October 3, 2006, SCOTT M. CAMPBELL; beloved son of Stanley and Lorraine Pugaczewski; loving brother of John Campbell and his wife Lisa and Pete Campbell and his wife Michelle; also survived by loving nieces and nephews; beloved friend of Priscilla Blair. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME OF BEL AIR INC., 610 MacPhail Road (at Route 24) on Thursday and Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A funeral service will be held at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church on Saturday at 9:30 A.M. Interment will be at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church Cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 5, 2005
Art theaters and film festivals can be great for dates. Couples put their coffee down and snuggled closer as they watched Ingrid Bergman pitch the woo to Cary Grant in Notorious when the Maryland Film Festival showed Hitchcock's classic at the Charles two years ago, with Margaret Carlson hosting. Art theaters and film festivals can also be great for the raunchy group catharses most often associated with comedy clubs. Festival-goers who attend John Waters' hilarious, heartfelt explications of terrible movies about extreme behavior know how fun or exciting it can be to break taboos en masse (if not as conducive as Notorious to back-row necking and petting)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 2005
The people are just a little too calculatedly quirky in Off the Map, an otherwise engaging comedy from actor-director Campbell Scott about a free-spirited family of desert nomads eking out a deceptively alluring living in late-'60s New Mexico. Joan Allen, showing off the comedic chops displayed to even better effect in The Upside of Anger (also now in theaters) is Arlene Groden, a deceptively well-grounded earth mother surrounded by baskets and near-basket cases. She's the only one in the film who really shouldn't be called quirky, although she does enjoy standing out in her garden naked.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur and Ann McArthur,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
On a frigid Friday afternoon in the lobby of a fancy hotel in Washington, Campbell Scott arrived to promote Off the Map, dressed casually in gray corduroy pants, carrying just a black backpack. The actor, director and producer -- who directed the film, which opens tomorrow -- had no entourage and wasn't approached by autograph-seekers. But that's the way he likes it. "I don't have the energy for fame," said Scott, 43. Despite making his big-screen debut in The Sheltering Sky and capturing breakout roles in Longtime Companion, and Hollywood vehicles Dying Young and Cameron Crowe's Singles, Scott prefers staying off Hollywood's radar and spending his efforts working on independent films.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 3, 2003
The studios see the movie year as a circus held up by tent poles - "franchise" pictures like the Mummy spin-offs or the Bond films. But even if it's as jam-packed with good things as 2002 was, the movie year for most cities is more like a hammock - it begins and ends strongly, but sags badly in between. The relatively few Hollywood-financed films that even aim for artistic quality - along with foreign or independent films with Oscars in their eyes - open in New York and Los Angeles first, usually in the fall, then spread to the rest of the country over the course of months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 18, 1992
Whoever said youth is too precious to be wasted on the young didn't really get it right; on the basis of "Singles" it would appear that depression, anomie, self-loathing and fear are entirely too precious to be wasted on the young -- they simply don't know how to enjoy them yet."Singles" examines the lives of a set of young men and women in Seattle, Wash., evidently a bastion of counterculture values in the far Northwest. Not only is it wet and rainy there, it's still the '60s.The setting isn't exactly a commune, but almost: It's an apartment building, each of whose units has been rented by a twentysomething yearner after happiness.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | June 20, 1991
* ''Dying Young'' Julia Roberts is a young woman who becomes live-in caretaker of a young man who is ill. Campbell Scott is the shut-in who is dominated by his father.* ''The Rocketeer'' It is 1938 and a pilot finds a rocket pack that allows him to fly. Interested in gaining possession of the pack are the Nazis, who are represented in Hollywood by an actor who is meant to suggest Errol Flynn. Timothy Dalton, Jennifer Connelly and Bill Campbell star.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 28, 1991
''Past Midnight,'' shooting in Seattle, stars Rutger Hauer and Natasha Richardson in a psychological thriller about a social worker who befriends a client convicted of a heinous murder. Also shooting in Seattle is ''Singles'' for Warner Bros. Cameron Crowe follows "Say Anything" with this romantic comedy that looks at a group of young folks who alternately search for and run from that thing called love. Bridget Fonda, Campbell Scott, Kyra Sedgwick, Shella Kelly, Matt Dillon and Bill Pullman are in the cast.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
One of the singular pleasures of watching "The Impostors," the new comedy by protean actor Stanley Tucci ("Big Night"), is the sound of the audience's laughter during the opening sequence of the movie.Tucci and Oliver Platt are engaged in a routine most often associated with the work of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton -- a comic pas de deux that involves much pantomimed confusion over tables and chairs, cigarettes and a girl, and that ends in a donnybrook of flying fists and a gothic death.
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