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By John Steadman | June 30, 1993
There was an artistic elegance to the way Roy Campanella handled a catcher's mitt. As a young boy, the year was 1945, we watched intently from the old wooden grandstand as the Baltimore Elite Giants played at Bugle Field (named for a coat and laundry company). It took only a thimble of awareness to realize he belonged in the major leagues -- and would have been except for being born with what was then considered the wrong complexion.Organized baseball hadn't yet lifted the racial barrier so Campanella was confined to the Negro National League.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | January 14, 2007
NEW ORLEANS -- Hurricane Katrina left this nonpareil city with conflicting challenges: Change almost everything - how you think, where you live and your faith in government - but cling to history and tradition like a lifeline. Long before the event known here as "the storm," New Orleans had all the problems of big cities. But the long-standing need to change was masked by such aspects of New Orleans life as good times in the French Quarter, Cajun food and the city's deep jazz and blues heritage.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 1997
Pitcher Frank Campanella struck out 11 batters and scattered five hits yesterday, plus teammate Matt Sargent knocked in four runs to help No. 6-ranked Liberty clinch its first Carroll County title since 1990 with a 7-1 victory over No. 19 South Carroll.Campanella had considerably more fun than he did in his last outing against South Carroll. Then, the senior left-hander hit two batters in relief in the seventh inning, allowing the winning run to score.The host Lions, whose first game against South Carroll didn't count in the county standings, are now 12-2 overall and 5-0 in the county.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | November 9, 2006
Around the narrow streets of Baltimore's Little Italy yesterday, the O'Malley and Ehrlich placards were still hanging proudly in the windows of restaurants and Formstone rowhouses. But no one was talking about the men who duked it out in the race to become Maryland's next governor. Instead, neighbors were buzzing with pride about one of their own, Nancy Pelosi, who is likely to become the nation's first female speaker of the House. They remembered the shy girl who wasn't allowed on a date without one of her five brothers along as chaperone.
NEWS
July 15, 1997
Carrie Campanella BeckerIn an obituary published in yesterday's editions, the age and occupation of Carrie Campanella Becker were incorrect. She was 35 and a riding instructor.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 7/15/97
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
John Campanella grew up hearing how his father, an original Baltimore Colt who went on to become the team's general manager, collapsed in 1967 while playing handball at an athletic club on Howard Street. Dead by the time he hit the floor, Joe Campanella was the apparent victim of a heart attack. It was an assumption that stood until his daughter, Carrie Campanella Becker, died just as suddenly - and, at 36, just as young - after riding a horse on the family farm in Churchville. Her death from a rare illness that can trigger a dangerously rapid heartbeat was enough to scare John Campanella into getting evaluated.
NEWS
September 29, 1991
Name: Kathleen R. CampanellaHonored by The Carroll County Sun for: Being appointed promotions coordinator for the Downtown Westminster Business and Professional Association on Sept. 12Age: 39Residence; hometown: Sykesville; Bellefonte, Pa.Education: Bachelor's degree in sociology from the University of AlabamaFamily: Husband: Vincent A., 42, owner of Campanella & Associates, a marketing, communications and public relations company; sons: Frank, 12, a seventh-grader at Mount Airy Middle, and Nick, 8, a third-grader at Eldersburg ElementaryActivities/hobbies: Account executive at Campanella & Associates, public relations committee for Carroll County Hospice, member of the Piedmont Pacers and past president ofthe Baltimore Alumnae Chapter of Alpha Omicron PiRecipient's comments: "I am looking forward to working with the members of the Downtown Westminster Business and Professional Association.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
Carroll County's Economic Development Commission gained three new members yesterday.The three local business executives will serve on the county advisory commission for two years.The new members are:* Dana Caro, head of F&M Manufacturing in Westminster. His company -- which started about 10 years ago in Hampstead -- makes parts for companies such as Black & Decker Corp., builds components for projects in the space program and constructs robotics for the military and the U.S. Postal Service.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 9, 1993
More than 100 people shared information on refugees and resettlement opportunities at the Maryland Refugee Advisory Council's annual meeting last week in New Windsor, officials said this week.The council met Dec. 2 with Lavinia Limon, director of the Federal Office of Refugee Resettlement, and state coordinators from Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington, D.C., at the Brethren Service Center."Everyone wants to work together to help refugees fit into society and become self-sufficient," said Kathleen Campanella, the center's public information coordinator.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2000
Vince Campanella remembers the hundreds of people who showed up in a remote village of the Kilosa area of Tanzania, Africa, seeking a little pill that would alleviate the terrible itching they were suffering from river blindness. "That was the most significant thing - I'm in a village where we expected to see 20 people and 300 people came," said Campanella, a member of Bonds Meadow Rotary Club that helped raise money for the Kilosa Region River Blindness Project. "We were watching Dr. Glen Brubaker, a medical doctor with the group, and he wasn't planning to treat the people that day," Campanella continued, "but he pulled out some pills and the demand was so great, they treated 178 people."
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON | October 1, 2006
In the news As president of the Little Italy Community Organization, she rallied residents who were upset about a late-night dance party held at Velleggia's restaurant, which is being sold for $1.8 million to Terry Lee Coffman Jr., a local real estate investor. Occupation She is a retired federal worker and business owner. She was recruited by the federal government when she graduated from Seton High School in 1959 at the age of 17, and held various positions with the Social Security Administration and Department of Veterans Affairs until 1979, when she started working full time for her husband Gino's tile and marble business.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 10, 2003
Three members of a small service club in Westminster are to travel to the United Republic of Tanzania tomorrow to study progress against river blindness. Bonds Meadow Rotary Club, which has dedicated its resources to eradicating the disease that devastates remote villages in the East African nation, secured a grant of nearly $300,000 from Rotary International two years ago. The grant pays for medicine and vehicles to transport it to remote areas of the country where up to 4 million residents are at risk from the disease.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
John Campanella grew up hearing how his father, an original Baltimore Colt who went on to become the team's general manager, collapsed in 1967 while playing handball at an athletic club on Howard Street. Dead by the time he hit the floor, Joe Campanella was the apparent victim of a heart attack. It was an assumption that stood until his daughter, Carrie Campanella Becker, died just as suddenly - and, at 36, just as young - after riding a horse on the family farm in Churchville. Her death from a rare illness that can trigger a dangerously rapid heartbeat was enough to scare John Campanella into getting evaluated.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2000
Vince Campanella remembers the hundreds of people who showed up in a remote village of the Kilosa area of Tanzania, Africa, seeking a little pill that would alleviate the terrible itching they were suffering from river blindness. "That was the most significant thing - I'm in a village where we expected to see 20 people and 300 people came," said Campanella, a member of Bonds Meadow Rotary Club that helped raise money for the Kilosa Region River Blindness Project. "We were watching Dr. Glen Brubaker, a medical doctor with the group, and he wasn't planning to treat the people that day," Campanella continued, "but he pulled out some pills and the demand was so great, they treated 178 people."
FEATURES
By Greg Braxton and Greg Braxton,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 13, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- The faded brick warehouse on a dirty and nearly hidden street near downtown Los Angeles looks like the last place in the world for a Hollywood revolution.The building, just a stone's throw from the Lacy Street Cabaret, with its promise of "LIVE NUDE GIRLS," couldn't look more weathered and bland.The painted brick that reads "Dyer Industrial Textiles" has seen better days. Only the trailers, cable and cars that line the street hint that there is more happening within.The inside of the building, which was formerly used as a sound stage for "Cagney & Lacey," is another world entirely.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1999
Life's simplest necessities are as close as the nearest mall for most Americans and as far away as a warehouse in Maryland for thousands of Kosovo refugees.Volunteers and staff members of Brethren Service Center in New Windsor are working to bring those things closer to the war-ravaged Balkans.Last week, they sorted tons of underwear, socks and toiletries, putting them into what they call family packs. The shipment will be on its way tomorrow to Albania, Bosnia and Macedonia."It will be airlifted from JFK International [Airport in New York]
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1999
Life's simplest necessities are as close as the nearest mall for most Americans and as far away as a warehouse in Maryland for thousands of Kosovo refugees.Volunteers and staff members of Brethren Service Center in New Windsor are working to bring those things closer to the war-ravaged Balkans.Last week, they sorted tons of underwear, socks and toiletries, putting them into what they call family packs. The shipment will be on its way tomorrow to Albania, Bosnia and Macedonia."It will be airlifted from JFK International [Airport in New York]
NEWS
July 15, 1997
Carrie Campanella BeckerIn an obituary published in yesterday's editions, the age and occupation of Carrie Campanella Becker were incorrect. She was 35 and a riding instructor.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 7/15/97
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