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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
The top three contenders in the Democratic race for mayor of Baltimore are all chronic violators of the Maryland law requiring timely disclosure of campaign contributions, election records show.The campaign committees of City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III, City Councilman Martin O'Malley and former school board member Carl Stokes all have been cited numerous times for missing the deadlines for disclosing campaign finances.Officials of each campaign have paid hundreds of dollars in fees for late filings from previous elections over the course of the candidate's political career.
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NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | January 16, 2014
Republican gubernatorial hopeful Charles Lollar's supporters often say that he is "the only candidate that can win," but his campaign finance report raises more questions than answers. (Disclosure: Red Maryland's editors have unanimously endorsed Larry Hogan for governor.) Lollar's gubernatorial campaign raised a paltry $65,329.67 during the last year, and he has only $5,731.35 available cash-on-hand according to the filings due to the Board of Elections yesterday. That's not the interesting part.
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2005
With Election Day more than a year and a half away, Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s campaign has about $1 million in the bank -- about as much as he spent running for his first term, according to a figures supplied by his campaign yesterday. Smith raised more in the past year than the two Democrats likely to run for governor next year, the campaign reports showed. Smith, who has said he will seek a second term as county executive next year, may be building his treasury early, in part, to scare off would-be opponents, political experts say. "One of the reasons to raise money early is to lock in contributors so they won't contribute to others.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
In more than 30 states, if a corporate chieftain were to ask top executives to contribute to a politician, an inquisitive voter could easily learn that the firm was bankrolling the candidate. But not in Maryland. Campaigns are not required to disclose the occupation and employer of large contributors. That will change as of June 1 if Gov. Martin O'Malley signs legislation approved by the General Assembly that would require campaigns to gather such information from donors who give $500 or more to a single candidate during a four-year election cycle.
NEWS
April 4, 1997
PUBLIC EMBARRASSMENT works. Had it not been for a series of campaign financing controversies last year, election reforms likely would have been ignored by the 1997 General Assembly. Instead, state legislators embraced this week -- some with extreme reluctance -- major changes that put Maryland in the forefront of giving citizens easier access to campaign reports, making it simple to spot violations and providing prosecutors with better enforcement tools.Right now, 6,000 candidates file campaign finance reports by paper, leaving citizens with little chance of making sense out of the incredible array of details in these massive filings.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2003
Richard Irish, the former campaign treasurer to Baltimore County Councilman John A. Olszewski Sr., has agreed to plead guilty to stealing more than $60,000 in campaign funds and falsifying campaign reports, his attorney said yesterday. Maryland state prosecutors filed charges against Irish on Monday on two counts, one for theft and one for false campaign reports. Patrick M. Smith, a Glen Burnie attorney representing Irish, said his client has agreed to plead guilty to those charges in exchange for the prosecutor recommending a suspended sentence.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2003
Richard Irish, former campaign treasurer and confidant of Baltimore County Councilman John Olszewski Sr., avoided a lengthy prison sentence yesterday by pleading guilty to stealing more than $62,000 in campaign funds and falsifying campaign reports. Under a plea agreement approved by Baltimore County Circuit Judge Patrick Cavanaugh, a 10-year sentence and $25,000 in fines were suspended after Irish agreed to pay back the money he stole and to attend meetings at Gamblers Anonymous. Irish was placed on five years' probation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
Unsuccessful state Senate candidate Robert Fulton Dashiell has filed two overdue campaign finance reports listing 83 people who got $125 each for election-day campaign work -- payments that are under investigation by Maryland's prosecutor.The reports filed by Dashiell, a member of the Baltimore County school board, paint a picture of a campaign built on paid staff and workers rather than on volunteers, and funded largely by the candidate himself.But Dashiell -- an attorney who owes $950 in late fees on four campaign reports -- said yesterday that he has not seen the latest report, signed by campaign treasurer Audrey Quarles.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writers | April 19, 1995
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's re-election committee is raising questions again about the campaign finances of rival Mary Pat Clarke -- this time about payments of roughly $20,000 made from Citizens for Clarke to Mrs. Clarke during her tenure as City Council president.In a statement aimed yesterday at keeping the political spotlight on Mrs. Clarke's campaign finances for the third week in a row, the Kurt Schmoke Committee questioned whether the money paid to Mrs. Clarke was for "legitimate campaign expenses."
NEWS
December 15, 1996
INADVERTENTLY, Brian H. Davis may have done Marylanders a favor. By making a mockery of state campaign finance laws during a quarter-million-dollar giving binge, this little-known Baltimore businessman has become the poster child for election reform in the General Assembly.Why Mr. Davis so flagrantly exceeded donation limits in sprinkling big contributions to numerous politicians remains a mystery. What's clear is how he could get away with obvious violations of state election laws.The secret lies in the antiquated set-up at the state elections board.
NEWS
Alison Knezevich | February 1, 2012
Some campaign finance reports due in January were submitted late because filers had problems using the state's new online reporting system, according to the state Board of Elections. The online system was rolled out late last year, said Ross Goldstein, deputy state administrator of the board. Some people did not understand how to use it. “It's pretty different as far as the steps to file your report,” Goldstein said. “It was just a learning curve.” State administrator of elections Linda Lamone will recommend waivers of late fees associated with the technical difficulties, if a waiver is requested by filers, he said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman raised only $500 in campaign cash since Thanksgiving, and spent $47,666 according to the latest campaign finance reports due Wednesday. But don't feel too sorry for him. Re-elected to a second and final four-year term, the Democratic executive has $439,668 left in the bank for whatever run he might make in 2014, which is a lot more than any other county official reported, although not all the reports were immediately available. He said he didn't do any fundraising after the election.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2011
A group of lawmakers and election lawyers called Tuesday for tighter state regulations on giving by political slates and limited-liability corporations, two-oft criticized ways that donors may flood candidates with money. The recommendations are among 25 proposed by the group convened by Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler last fall to study the state's campaign finance system. Many of the changes would require legislative action. Top lawmakers have said they expect to entertain many bills this year aimed at reforming campaign finance, a hot topic after the Nov. 2 gubernatorial election.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2010
Howard County Democrats, most of whom cruised to easy re-election, will return to office flush with leftover campaign cash, according to the latest state reports. County Executive Ken Ulman, a Democrat, reported $486,834 in cash on hand after the election. His leftovers amount to more than any candidate ever spent to run for Howard's top job until his first campaign in 2006. Ulman, who won with 62 percent of the vote, raised a record total of $1.4 million over the four-year cycle since January 2007, according to state reports.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., the Republican nominee for governor, reported Tuesday that he and running mate Mary Kane have raised more than $2.8 million since the end of August. "We like where we are right now," Ehrlich said after a campaign event in Baltimore County, adding that last-minute donations were coming in "fast and furious. " The Ehrlich campaign had about $1.77 million left in the bank as of Sunday night, spokesman Henry Fawell said. He said that 98 percent of the money raised came from Maryland families and small businesses and that the campaign took out no loans.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | August 20, 2010
An audit by the Federal Election Commission has uncovered significant errors in Rep. Roscoe Bartlett's campaign account, the agency disclosed this week. A final audit of the Bartlett for Congress Committee for 2007 and 2008 found that it failed to report dozens of expenses and significantly under-reported the amounts he raised and spent during that period, which covered his '08 re-election run. The FEC, which enforces federal election law, has not imposed any penalties. Nor did it describe the errors as intentional.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 13, 2010
Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. released his hotly anticipated campaign fundraising numbers this morning. The Republican says he has raised $3.2 million -- about the same as his chief opponent, Gov. Martin O'Malley. O'Malley, a Democrat who began the year with $5.7 million to Ehrlich's $140,000, now has $6.7 million cash on hand, his campaign reports. Ehrlich reported this morning that he has "in excess of" $2 million in the bank. Ehrlich said he exceeded his money-raising expectations and noted that he'd pullled in cash from more than 13,000 individual donors, 96 percent of whom live in Maryland.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1995
Carl Stokes, one of four candidates vying to become the next president of the Baltimore City Council, has been repeatedly tardy in filing required campaign reports, and authorities have issued an arrest warrant for his last treasurer -- his brother.Mr. Stokes was the only one of four council members running for the city's second-highest position to meet the most recent state deadline for updating his finance statements.But six financial disclosure reports about his 1991 election were turned in late -- and the resulting fines went unpaid for two years -- prompting the state prosecutor to charge Mr. Stokes' brother with two counts of election-law violations.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 13, 2010
Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. released his hotly anticipated campaign fundraising numbers this morning. The Republican says he has raised $3.2 million -- about the same as his chief opponent, Gov. Martin O'Malley. O'Malley, a Democrat who began the year with $5.7 million to Ehrlich's $140,000, now has $6.7 million cash on hand, his campaign reports. Ehrlich reported this morning that he has "in excess of" $2 million in the bank. Ehrlich said he exceeded his money-raising expectations and noted that he'd pullled in cash from more than 13,000 individual donors, 96 percent of whom live in Maryland.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 28, 2009
Baltimore County Councilman Kenneth N. Oliver, who already faces charges of violating campaign finance laws, has missed a deadline to file his annual campaign finance report. The second-term Democrat, who represents the Randallstown and Woodlawn areas, has been fined $10 a day since the Jan. 21 filing deadline, a state elections official said. Oliver said yesterday that he attempted to file the annual report electronically several times Monday but did not succeed. "Every time I tried to file, the computer kicked it back," he said.
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