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By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
The winners in the race for county school board will not be official for days, but one candidate already says that dirty campaigning could cost her a seat. Diane Butler, who finished fourth in the contest for three seats, said campaign literature distributed by third-place finisher Allen Dyer was taken out of context and distributed without her permission. "This is dirty politics," said Butler, who finished about 1,000 votes behind Dyer. "I was very nice with Allen, and this is how he repaid me."
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Gilbert Thornton Renaut, a retired federal attorney who became an Annapolis activist, mayoral candidate and neighborhood problem-solver, died of a heart attack Feb. 27 at his home in the capital's Murray Hill community. He was 66. "Gilbert had an abiding passion for Annapolis," Annapolis Mayor Joshua J. Cohen said in a statement. "His decades-long record of involvement as a civic leader, as a member of numerous boards and commissions, and as a candidate for public office greatly enriched our quality of life.
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NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 3, 2004
ELBERT RAY Henderson, the brave soul who's decided to run as a Republican for mayor of Baltimore, had no problem when he did a little electioneering at the city's Greek-American festival. It was the same when he passed out his campaign literature at the Italian-American and Polish-American festivals. But when Henderson, an African-American, tried the same thing at the African-American Heritage Festival last month, he had people all up in his grill telling him to pack up his fliers. Two of those people were security guards.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2010
It's cop against cop in a standoff over the use of a police badge in a race for the Baltimore County Council. Baltimore County Police Chief James Johnson has sent a cease-and-desist letter to council candidate Charles "Buzz" Beeler of Dundalk over the retired officer's use of a police badge in campaign literature. The chief threatened legal action in the Aug. 11 letter to Beeler, a veteran of the county force for more than 30 years, if he did not immediately stop using the badge and retrieve any fliers or mailers with the symbol.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1996
As Election Day nears, the heated race for Howard County's Circuit Court bench is drawing to a close with voters being inundated by a flood of campaign literature.This week, tens of thousands of pieces of campaign literature are being mailed by both sides -- and more will be handed out this weekend -- in the last-minute rush to reach voters.As has been the case throughout the bitter race, this week's campaign literature is replete with half-truths, mudslinging and passionate appeals.The literature is aimed at swaying the many county voters who -- according to a round of Sun interviews two weeks ago -- remain undecided among the four candidates for the two judicial seats.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
Two candidates for president of the Baltimore Teachers Union have raised concerns about next week's election, saying the process favors incumbents and isn't fairly run. Three teachers are running against union President Marietta English. Two of the challengers - Clarice Herbert-Brown, a languages teacher at Walbrook High Uniform Services Academy, and Kojo L. McCallum, a fourth-grade teacher at Charles Carroll Barrister Elementary School - said they have become increasingly frustrated with the process.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | October 6, 1994
Two lawsuits have been filed in city Circuit Court seeking to void the results of the House and Senate elections in the 40th Legislative District, which encompasses a large portion of West Baltimore.Contractor Robert Clay, an unsuccessful candidate for the House, accuses the incumbents in his race of promoting numerous acts of election fraud, including urging election judges to pull the lever for them.Mr. Clay's attorney, David B. Shapiro, said the main allegation is that Dels. Howard P. Rawlings, Salima Siler Marriott and Tony E. Fulton were responsible for campaign literature circulated throughout the district that called Mr. Clay a "deadbeat dad, a carpetbagger and an indicted murderer."
NEWS
By KEVIN COWHERD | November 8, 2006
It was 10 in the morning outside the elementary school in northern Baltimore County where I vote, and the usual gaggle of smiling volunteers was working the sidewalk, thrusting campaign literature into the hands of people coming in and encouraging them to vote for their candidate. This is a weird phenomenon you see only on Election Day. But it makes you wonder: What if this sort of thing happened in other walks of life? What if every time you went to the supermarket, there were people at the entrance thrusting fliers into your hands and murmuring, "StarKist Chunk Light Tuna, appreciate your support" or "Thomas' Original English Muffins - can we count on you picking up a package?"
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | November 8, 1994
The ghost of a 1990 scandal involving Nazi salutes by county sheriff's deputies made a last-minute encore yesterday, this time haunting Richmond Laney, the Republican challenger in the sheriff's race.With some of the county's leading Republicans and a Columbia rabbi supporting him, Sheriff Michael A. Chiuchiolo, a Democrat, charged yesterday that Mr. Laney's campaign was being helped by two former deputies Sheriff Chiuchiolo fired for delivering Nazi greetings and Nazi-style straight-arm salutes on the job.Mr.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- With soaring rhetoric in praise of the political pamphleteer in American history, the Supreme Court cut back yesterday on the government's power to ban anonymous campaign literature.The 7-2 decision settled one aspect of anonymous leafletting, saying the Constitution protects it when it is done by individuals in local elections. But the ruling left in doubt whether other forms of political literature that omit their source will get such protection.If lower courts note the broad language used by the majority, and apply it literally, the ruling could threaten laws in all but one state and several federal laws, which require those who pass out campaign materials or advertise to identify themselves.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
The winners in the race for county school board will not be official for days, but one candidate already says that dirty campaigning could cost her a seat. Diane Butler, who finished fourth in the contest for three seats, said campaign literature distributed by third-place finisher Allen Dyer was taken out of context and distributed without her permission. "This is dirty politics," said Butler, who finished about 1,000 votes behind Dyer. "I was very nice with Allen, and this is how he repaid me."
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Annie Linskey and Sumathi Reddy and Annie Linskey,Sun Reporters | August 19, 2007
It's early, really early, but here is City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. standing at a corner in West Baltimore, a bevy of mostly young volunteers waving Mitchell for Mayor signs all around him. Such is the life of an underdog candidate for mayor whose campaign is marked by an old-fashioned, grass-roots strategy that includes door-knocking, phone banks and that most inglorious of all things, sign waving. A week later, Mayor Sheila Dixon appears at a Southwest Baltimore neighborhood with an entourage -- 50-people strong, including some of the city's high-level officials, as television cameras and reporters trail her. This is door-knocking, mayoral style.
NEWS
April 1, 2007
Political campaign literature will seldom be mistaken for the gospel truth, but last November's "sample ballots" indicating former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele were Democrats and that they had been endorsed by a number of prominent black leaders crossed a line. Various versions of these handouts, which were widely distributed on Election Day in Baltimore and Prince George's County by African-Americans bused in from out of state, didn't change the outcome for either candidate, but in terms of sheer brazenness, it set a new - low - standard.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | March 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin isn't letting this flier thing go. In the end, the "Democratic sample ballot" distributed by his Republican opponents last Election Day had little effect on Cardin's campaign for Maryland's open Senate seat. He rolled up 3-to-1 margins in the predominantly black precincts where the fliers were distributed on his way to a 10-point victory over Republican Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele. Still, Maryland's junior senator seems to be making it his mission to outlaw a broad array of campaign abuses.
NEWS
By KEVIN COWHERD | November 8, 2006
It was 10 in the morning outside the elementary school in northern Baltimore County where I vote, and the usual gaggle of smiling volunteers was working the sidewalk, thrusting campaign literature into the hands of people coming in and encouraging them to vote for their candidate. This is a weird phenomenon you see only on Election Day. But it makes you wonder: What if this sort of thing happened in other walks of life? What if every time you went to the supermarket, there were people at the entrance thrusting fliers into your hands and murmuring, "StarKist Chunk Light Tuna, appreciate your support" or "Thomas' Original English Muffins - can we count on you picking up a package?"
NEWS
September 10, 2006
Rosapepe worked hard for Clinton The Sept. 3 article about the 21st District state Senate race quoted Jim Rosapepe's opponent criticizing his service in the Clinton administration with no response from those of us who served with him. The truth is that, as U.S. ambassador to Romania, Jim was a hard-charging advocate for President Clinton's foreign policy agenda. No one should be surprised that he ruffled some bureaucratic feathers. The bottom line is that he successfully served Clinton and did a great job. John Podesta Washington, D.C. The writer is a former chief of staff to President Bill Clinton.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1998
It's no wonder savvy politicians are clamoring to paint themselves as a voter's ideal "pro-education candidate."A poll conducted by Anne Arundel Community College's Center for the Study of Local Issues indicates that for the first time in four years, education is the top concern of county residents.Asked what is "the most important problem facing the residents of Anne Arundel County," 29 percent of the respondents named education, 26 percent said growth, 19 percent said crime, and 5 percent said taxes.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Andrea Siegel contributed to this article | August 18, 1994
Nancy Schrum, a latecomer to the state Senate race in District 31, appears to have pulled her Republican opponent's ticket out from under him.Joseph "Jack" Feehley, former president of the Greater Pasadena Council and retired builder, heads a slate of State House candidates, called "Four for '94," that was registered with the state election office 1 1/2 years ago. District 31 includes Riviera Beach, Brooklyn Park and Pasadena.Although the GOP ticket remains intact on paper, and on more than a few campaign T-shirts, the names of its three House of Delegates candidates -- Brian Brooks, John McGagahan and James J. Riley -- now appear in campaign literature promoting Mrs. Schrum, a former Bodkin Elementary School PTA president.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2005
USUALLY, WHEN reporters call an aspiring politician with just $400 in the war chest, the candidate is eager to slam the opposing party and boast about his professional contacts - that is, unless the candidate is a federal employee. Gilbert Renaut, 58, a community leader and lawyer at the Department of Energy, is running for mayor of Annapolis - as an independent. And his day job is certainly cramping his campaign style. When reached at work, Renaut could not take the call. The Hatch Act prohibits him from campaigning on government time.
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