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NEWS
December 9, 2011
Why does The Sun allow Dan Rodricks to have a column on the front page with his idiotic views ("Drawing the line in cutthroat business of politics," Dec. 7)? In his column, he points out the use of fraud to get people to go to the polls is illegal in Maryland and wants to bash Paul Schurick for doing so. He fails to allude to all the signs for President Barack Obama that appeared during the 2010 election in African American communities in an attempt to get blacks to believe they needed to go to the polls to vote for Mr. Obama.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 19, 2014
I normally agree with columnist Dan Rodricks ' assertions and conclusions, but I was disappointed with his comments regarding Attorney General Doug Gansler's gubernatorial campaign ( "10 weeks out, 2 questions for Maryland Democrats," April 12). Mr. Rodricks chose to focus on the beach-house party in Delaware last summer that Mr. Gansler briefly visited. However, either he doesn't know the facts about that incident or he simply considers them irrelevant. The Instagram photo does show Mr. Gansler amid a group of partying teenagers, including his son. The photo also shows adult chaperons keeping an eye on the revelers - but Mr. Rodricks doesn't bother to point that out. He also neglects to note that the party house was rented for graduation week festivities by five sets of student parents who slept in the house all week - with at least two of them chaperoning at all times.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella | November 12, 2013
Under Armour's latest ad campaign "Under Armour Makes You Better," is narrated by company founder Kevin Plank and shows athletes battling extreme conditions and frigid temperatures. No worries there, however, because the athletes, including world champion downhill skier Lindsey Vonn, freestyle skier Bobby Brown and X Games champion and snowboard cross athlete Dominique Maltais, are ready with the help of Under Armour's ColdGear Infrared apparel. The latest effort in the I WILL campaign will debut Monday during Monday Night Football for the New England Patriots vs. Carolina Panthers game.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Melony Griffith is in District Heights making her pitch to voters. The veteran Prince George's County delegate is telling them about her 15 years of legislative experience, her expertise on state pension issues and her plans to boost the economy. There's one thing Griffith is conspicuously not mentioning: her opponent, Ulysses S. Currie's, trial on corruption charges and subsequent censure by the Maryland Senate. For the first time in 12 years, Currie, still a towering Annapolis figure, is facing a Democratic primary challenger.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Republican businessman Charles Lollar kicked off his campaign for governor Tuesday with a four-day, 17-stop bus tour of Maryland. The Charles County businessman, Marine major and Republican activist was the subject a "Draft Lollar" campaign to convince him to run. Tuesday, Lollar and supporters began a tour in a 16-seat bus that bears his photo. Lollar, 42, describes himself as a fiscal conservative and social libertarian who believes the state's top job is about managing tax payer money.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2011
So much for the mother's milk of American politics. In Baltimore, it's orange juice. Del. Keiffer Mitchell endorsed Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's re-election campaign in a video released Monday -- one day she drew crowds to his OJ stand at the farmers' market. Coincidence? Mitchell copped to the quid pro quo when I spoke with him just now. He said Mayor SRB came by his stand Sunday. She wasn't buying, but her photographer took a glass of juice. Soon a crowd gathered to see the mayor, and suddenly Mitchell was squeezing up a storm.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
The article entitled "Outside money cements place on Capitol Hill" (Oct. 21) really disgusted me. I realize that the Supreme Court opened the floodgates for corporations supporting candidates and that is a separate issue, but the net concept is the same. Why would corporations and individuals blow so much money on campaigns if they truly got nothing in return? In an economy where thousands are barely surviving and corporations have cut jobs, why is dumping millions of dollars to support a candidate a good idea?
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
State Sen. Rob Garagiola will report raising $330,000 for his Democratic bid for Congress, a campaign official said Tuesday -- a haul that is twice as large as what Republican incumbent Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett is expected to report bringing in over the same period. Garagiola, who is running in Maryland's newly redrawn 6th Congressional District, formally entered the race in November and has been working aggressively behind the scenes to line up political and financial support.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
A national coalition pushing to legalize marijuana endorsed Del. Heather Mizeur in the race for governor on Friday. The political action committee for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws said in a statement Mizeur would "provide the leadership required to help Maryland move towards a new, smarter approach to marijuana.” The Montgomery County Democrat has made legalizing and taxing marijuana a platform issue in her...
NEWS
November 30, 2011
Once again, The Sun urges the institution of public campaign financing, implying that if such a plan were instituted, private campaign contributions would disappear and we'd all live happily ever after ("Appearance of conflict," Nov. 29). Nothing could be further from the truth. For one thing, there is that pesky First Amendment. For another, as our president demonstrated in his 2008 campaign, if you have enough private contributions, you can finance a campaign very nicely without utilizing public financing.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein got to work on his re-election campaign in a low-key way Saturday, knocking on the doors of likely voters in Northwest Baltimore and asking for their support. It was one of the first campaign activities Bernstein has organized this year and while he confirmed last summer that he intended to run again, he has been reluctant to talk about the political side of his job. On each doorstep he made no big promises about the future but pointed to his record in office.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Advocates in Maryland who backed the successful passage of the first statewide legal protections for transgender citizens in housing, employment and public accommodations this legislative session don't consider their work complete. The Maryland Coaltion of Transgender Equality says opponents of the bill are pushing misinformation, possibly in an effort to collect enough petition signatures to put the legislation up for a referendum vote -- just as was accomplished by opponents of Maryland's same-sex marriage bill.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan has emerged as a major force in his party's chase for campaign cash, collecting more money since he joined the race three months ago than his rivals took in all of last year, figures from the campaign show. The real-estate executive and former aide to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. reports raising more than $453,000 since he announced his candidacy for the GOP nomination in late January. And he has nearly as much cash in the bank as his closest rival, Harford County Executive David R. Craig, reported earlier this year.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
After a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Maryland election officials said Friday that they will no longer enforce a state law that imposes an overall limit of $10,000 on campaign contributions in a four-year election cycle. State officials said they would continue to enforce a Maryland law limiting individuals to contributing no more than $4,000 to a particular candidate during an election cycle. Donors, however, are now free to give $4,000 to as many candidates as desired. Without the limit, moneyed donors are likely to give more - or be asked to give more - and lower-profile races are more likely to get their attention.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 10, 2014
This is a column about campaign finance reform. And your eyes glazed over just then, didn't they? That's the problem with this problem. Americans know that government truly of, by and for the people is unlikely if not impossible so long as the system is polluted by billions of dollars in contributions from corporations and individual billionaires. Half of us, according to Gallup, would like to see public financing of campaigns; nearly 80 percent want to limit campaign fund-raising.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
I was pleased to read The Sun's editorial against the Supreme Court's wrongheaded decision in McCutcheon v. FEC ( "A win for the billionaires," April 6). I'm to hoping that this decision serves as a spark for change. The court's decision to eliminate federal limits on the total amount of money that mega-donors can contribute during an election cycle empowers a tiny group of fewer than 3,000 elite donors to spend an additional billion dollars in our elections through 2020. This isn't the way it should be. In our democracy, the size of your wallet shouldn't determine the strength of your voice in our political system.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas Gansler's statewide tour to launch his campaign for governor entered its third day Thursday as the Democrat took his stump speech to Western Maryland. Gansler has slightly different remarks - and campaign promises - for each of the 17 stops. On Wednesday, Gansler told a crowd in Hyattsville he supported extending the Metro to National Harbor where a casino is proposed, the campaign confirmed.  Gansler also told supporters he thought a law school should be established at the historically black Bowie State University in Prince George's County, the campaign confirmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
The United Way's 28th annual Haverst for the Hungry campaign is underway. The food-collection drive continues through Saturday. It's simple. You just leave non-perishable goods by your own mailbox and your letter carrier will pick up your donation and get it to the right folks. For more information and guidelines about what to donate, go to Harvest for the Hungry website . You can also donate money through Give Corps , and if you do you'll be eligible for a $20-off deal from Tapas Teatro . Other partners for the Harvest for the Hungry include Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, the United States Postal Service, WBAL-TV 11, The Baltimore Sun Media Group, Safeway and Girl Scouts of Central Maryland.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 7, 2014
Forty years ago, Congress enacted sweeping limits on political campaign spending in the wake of a shocking disclosure that one man - Chicago insurance executive W. Clement Stone - had given more than $3 million for the 1972 reelection of President Richard M. Nixon. The amount seemed outlandish then, in a campaign in which Nixon waltzed to victory over his Democratic opponent, Sen. George McGovern, winning 49 states and losing only Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. It was an easily predictable drubbing.
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