Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCampaign
IN THE NEWS

Campaign

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 9, 2011
Why does The Sun allow Dan Rodricks to have a column on the front page with his idiotic views ("Drawing the line in cutthroat business of politics," Dec. 7)? In his column, he points out the use of fraud to get people to go to the polls is illegal in Maryland and wants to bash Paul Schurick for doing so. He fails to allude to all the signs for President Barack Obama that appeared during the 2010 election in African American communities in an attempt to get blacks to believe they needed to go to the polls to vote for Mr. Obama.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
If Republican Larry Hogan wants to be Maryland's next governor, he needs to drive home his message of cutting taxes and creating jobs. And he needs to appear pleasant. For his part, Democrat Anthony G. Brown needs to avoid unforced errors that could squander his advantages. And he can't underestimate his opponent. This is among the advice offered by political pundits and campaign veterans, many of whom expect a lively race for governor when the campaign for the Nov. 4 election moves into higher gear in the coming weeks.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2011
So much for the mother's milk of American politics. In Baltimore, it's orange juice. Del. Keiffer Mitchell endorsed Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's re-election campaign in a video released Monday -- one day she drew crowds to his OJ stand at the farmers' market. Coincidence? Mitchell copped to the quid pro quo when I spoke with him just now. He said Mayor SRB came by his stand Sunday. She wasn't buying, but her photographer took a glass of juice. Soon a crowd gathered to see the mayor, and suddenly Mitchell was squeezing up a storm.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley is encouraging his supporters to launch an old-fashioned letter writing campaign to persuade Congress not to fast-track deportations of the thousands of unaccompanied minors who illegally crossed the U.S. border. O'Malley's political action committee, O' Say Can You See, on Thursday urged people to write letters to editors at newspapers across the country. The committee provided a form letter that invokes O'Malley's public comments.  The letter reads, "I agree with Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley when he said, "The greatest power we have as a people is the power of our principles, and that we should not send these kids back without a chance for them to make a case that they fled their country from fear of violence.' " O'Malley has gained national attention - and a rebuke from The White House - for his comments on dealing with what he has called a "humanitarian crisis" at the border.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Republican businessman Charles Lollar kicked off his campaign for governor Tuesday with a four-day, 17-stop bus tour of Maryland. The Charles County businessman, Marine major and Republican activist was the subject a "Draft Lollar" campaign to convince him to run. Tuesday, Lollar and supporters began a tour in a 16-seat bus that bears his photo. Lollar, 42, describes himself as a fiscal conservative and social libertarian who believes the state's top job is about managing tax payer money.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
The article entitled "Outside money cements place on Capitol Hill" (Oct. 21) really disgusted me. I realize that the Supreme Court opened the floodgates for corporations supporting candidates and that is a separate issue, but the net concept is the same. Why would corporations and individuals blow so much money on campaigns if they truly got nothing in return? In an economy where thousands are barely surviving and corporations have cut jobs, why is dumping millions of dollars to support a candidate a good idea?
NEWS
November 30, 2011
Once again, The Sun urges the institution of public campaign financing, implying that if such a plan were instituted, private campaign contributions would disappear and we'd all live happily ever after ("Appearance of conflict," Nov. 29). Nothing could be further from the truth. For one thing, there is that pesky First Amendment. For another, as our president demonstrated in his 2008 campaign, if you have enough private contributions, you can finance a campaign very nicely without utilizing public financing.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas Gansler's statewide tour to launch his campaign for governor entered its third day Thursday as the Democrat took his stump speech to Western Maryland. Gansler has slightly different remarks - and campaign promises - for each of the 17 stops. On Wednesday, Gansler told a crowd in Hyattsville he supported extending the Metro to National Harbor where a casino is proposed, the campaign confirmed.  Gansler also told supporters he thought a law school should be established at the historically black Bowie State University in Prince George's County, the campaign confirmed.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
In advance of tonight's serious debate about big issues in the race for governor, here are two amusing - intentionally or not - contributions to the political discourse this week, courtesy of Douglas F. Gansler's campaign. On Wednesday, his campaign publicized an original song written by a supporter. If you're wondering what rhymes with "Gansler," the answer is: "Gansler. "  The lyrics say "Doug Gansler" 14 times in less than 90 seconds, plus eek out another three mentions of "Doug" and two more of "Mr. Gansler.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
The United Way's 28th annual Haverst for the Hungry campaign is underway. The food-collection drive continues through Saturday. It's simple. You just leave non-perishable goods by your own mailbox and your letter carrier will pick up your donation and get it to the right folks. For more information and guidelines about what to donate, go to Harvest for the Hungry website . You can also donate money through Give Corps , and if you do you'll be eligible for a $20-off deal from Tapas Teatro . Other partners for the Harvest for the Hungry include Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, the United States Postal Service, WBAL-TV 11, The Baltimore Sun Media Group, Safeway and Girl Scouts of Central Maryland.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The two men vying to become Maryland's next governor have agreed to an hourlong televised debate in early October, reaching a deal after more than a month of uncertainty about when — and whether — the pair would face off. Democrat Anthony G. Brown and Republican Larry Hogan said Wednesday they have agreed to an Oct. 7 debate hosted by The Baltimore Sun and WJZ-TV, which will be taped in the morning and aired statewide that night. Behind the scenes, the campaigns are still wrangling over details of a television debate in the Washington region and a radio debate.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 31, 2014
In Under Armour's new 60-second TV spot, ballerina Misty Copeland stands in the practice studio, slowly rising onto her toes as music plays and, in a voice over, a young girl reads a rejection letter explaining why the ballet academy candidate was turned down. "You have the wrong body for ballet, and at 13 you are too old to be considered," the letter says. Copeland, attired in a black Under Armour tank top and the brand's "Cheeky" underwear bottoms, then is shown flying with grand jete leaps and rapid-fire spins across a vast lighted stage.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Baltimore County State Del. Jon S. Cardin, who lost the primary campaign for attorney general, says he was the victim of the "most negative smear campaign in a Democratic Party primary in Maryland's modern history. "  In a Facebook post this week, Cardin, who runs his own law practice, also said he plans to return to private life, after losing last month to Montgomery County State Sen. Brian Frosh. Frosh, whom Cardin calls a "good Democrat" in the post, will face Republican lawyer Jeffrey Pritzker in the general election.  Cardin received criticism during the primary campaign over his misuse of Baltimore police resources during a stunt wedding proposal; missing nearly 75 percent of his committee votes during the 2014 General Assembly session; and touting the endorsement of a Baltimore rapper facing human trafficking charges.  Some of these charges were made in negative mailers funded by labor unions that supported Frosh.  In a Facebook post shortly after the primary, Cardin called the campaign "disgustingly negative.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz and Lee S. Weinberg | July 24, 2014
There may be no more enigmatic concept in politics than negative campaigning. Virtually no one publicly supports it, almost every non-shoe-in political principal uses it, and almost no two people mean the same thing when they refer to it. Periodic hostile and ugly political campaigning goes back centuries in America. In the beginning of the 19th century, there was hatchet man James Thomson Callender's attacks on Thomas Jefferson, claiming the new president fathered children with slaves.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Republican Larry Hogan will pay for his bid for governor with public financing, the first candidate to mount a state-wide general election bid on taxpayer dollars in two decades.  Hogan's campaign will receive a $2.6 million within the next few weeks to finance his race against Democrat Anthony G. Brown, who has proved himself a formidable fundraiser by collecting more than $12 million for the primary election alone.  "The Democratic Party...
NEWS
July 9, 2014
Perry Wheeler's letter, "Heather will be back" (July 5), resonated with me. I also supported Del. Heather Mizeur as a way to combat the power of corporate money in politics. I hope she will be back, but we are still here. Although many folks have given up, American history shows that with persistence we can achieve real reform. One elected official who has tackled this problem is Rep. John Sarbanes of Maryland's 3 r d Congressional District. He has refused political action committee money and is funding his campaign through a matching system called "My Voice Does Count.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
State Sen. Rob Garagiola will report raising $330,000 for his Democratic bid for Congress, a campaign official said Tuesday -- a haul that is twice as large as what Republican incumbent Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett is expected to report bringing in over the same period. Garagiola, who is running in Maryland's newly redrawn 6th Congressional District, formally entered the race in November and has been working aggressively behind the scenes to line up political and financial support.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | January 15, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley will spend Martin Luther King Day on the hustings in South Carolina trying to convince GOP primary voters not to support Republican Mitt Romney for president. Maryland's governor will appear with a South Carolina state representative at a Myrtle Beach news conference where he will will accuse Romney of "job destruction," according to a news release. O'Malley, a Democrat, is scheduled to be back in Annapolis by Tuesday, when he's set to brief fiscal leaders and some county executives on his budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. O'Malley's role as a surrogate on the presidential campaign trail is the latest way in which he is using his chairmanship of  the Democratic Governors Association to burnish his national profile.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
At the urging of fire and rescue personnel upset by continuing roadway carnage, Baltimore County's top officials recently announced an effort to reduce pedestrian accidents and fatalities. If anything, the campaign is overdue given that the county recorded 22 pedestrian crash fatalities last year and is on pace to meet and exceed that total this year. At a news conference, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz noted the upward trend, decrying the fact that last year's total was far higher than during any of the five years prior.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Jack Dingman recounted an idyllic childhood in Dundalk and looked around the Heritage Fair on Saturday wishing for the blue-collar community to return to the glory that had been bolstered by a booming steel plant. The 28-year-old contractor, who now lives in Middle River, grew up less than a mile from the fairgrounds, and said he used to walk to the festival past thriving stores, restaurants and barbershops. "I love Dundalk, and I am proud to be from Dundalk," Dingman said. "But it breaks my heart.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.