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By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2000
A 29-year-old inmate serving time on a cocaine conviction collapsed at Maryland's adult boot camp in Jessup and died yesterday morning on his way to breakfast after a physical workout. Leonard Vines of the 3100 block of McElderry St. in East Baltimore was pronounced dead at Laurel Regional Hospital at 7: 41 a.m., about an hour after collapsing at the Herman L. Toulson Correctional Boot Camp. A Maryland Division of Correction spokesman said Vines had stretched, done 20 push-ups, run 1 1/2 miles and done 50 sit-ups.
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By Allison Eatough | February 1, 2013
When Stephanie Dignan left her job as a financial adviser to start her own fitness business, she had no idea she was about to change hundreds of lives. Just four months earlier, the Glenelg High School and University of Maryland graduate began teaching boot camp classes at a local gym. “I thought, 'Why not? I'll do it for fun,'” Dignan says. But that fun quickly developed into a passion -- one Dignan wanted to pursue full time. So in 2008, she launched her solo venture, The Boot Camp Girl LLC, with hopes of taking her boot camp skills and fitness ideas to clients across Howard County.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1994
A 26-year-old Westminster man went back to the Herman L. Toulson Correctional Camp in Jessup last week, as guest speaker at a graduation ceremony.Jason R. Barnes looked at the 28 men and one woman who had just completed the rigorous six-month boot camp for convicted criminals. Staying out of trouble isn't all that tough, he told them."I have a 40-hour-a-week job, I have my own apartment and I pay my bills. That's all I do," he said.Actually, he also checks in with his parole officer; goes to counseling sessions, attends services twice a week at the Church of the Open Door; plays in the church softball and basketball leagues and, although divorced, spends time with his 5-year-old daughter.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
About 165 underprivileged youth could step out of their routines this summer and enjoy outdoors experiences that include swimming, horseback riding and other programs, if Baltimore County can attract donors to its Campership Project. Contributions are down significantly for the program, which relies solely on donations and is administered by the Volunteer Office of the county Department of Social Welfare. The project sent 117 school-age children to day and overnight camps last summer at a cost of about $33,000.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | February 15, 1992
Some graduates of the state's boot camp prison who get into trouble back on the streets are returning to boot camp for a second dose of the military-style regimen, state officials said yesterday.Four inmates who violated their parole after leaving boot camp returned to the prison this month, spokesman Sgt. Gregory M. Shipley said.State officials are deciding what sort of refresher course to give the returning inmates, said Maj. Robert E. Clay, the boot camp commander.Meanwhile, state prison officials have suspended a boot camp fixture -- the lifting of huge logs for physical exercise -- after three inmates spent three days in a prison infirmary following a strenuous workout last week.
NEWS
June 21, 1993
Glenelg Country starts day camp on June 28Glenelg Country School is registering students in the "Summer in the Country" day camp program. The program is open to youngsters 6 to 7 years old.A pre-kindergarten camp is available for children 4 1/2 to 5 years olds.The two-week sessions begin June 28 and conclude Aug. 13. Bus transportation is available for the morning and afternoon sessions and for extended day care.For more information, call 531-2229.POLICE LOG* Woodstock: 10200 block of Green Clover Drive: Someone stole a $50 mailbox after unscrewing it from its post between 2 p.m. Tuesday and 10:30 a.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | December 20, 1990
The most polite guys in the State House these days wear black combat boots and light blue uniforms and go to bed behind prison bars.As members of 1st Alpha Company -- part of the state prison system's experimental boot camp program for young inmates -- the 11 men are assigned to sweep the halls, polish the brass door plates and generally keep things tidy inside the State House.Although visitors to the State House have been accustomed for years to seeing prisoners perform custodial duties, the appearance this week of the boot camp inmates caught many people by surprise -- first by their appearance and then by their courtesy.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1991
`TC Faced with a shortage of eligible inmates, the state's "boot camp" prison has changed its requirements to accept older and more dangerous inmates serving longer sentences.Under changes that went into effect Oct. 1, medium-security inmates will be eligible for boot camp for the first time.The maximum sentence for eligible inmates will also be increased from five years to eight years.Inmates as old as 32 are now being considered for the program. The age limit had been 26.In addition, inmates serving time for burglary will be eligible for the first time.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1991
His superiors say Major Robert E. Clay is doing a good job. His critics say he can be brutal, even a tyrant.But nobody has ever accused the commander of Maryland's boot camp prison of being a slouch.If Clay wants his inmates or officers to do 200 pushups, he does them, too. If the exercise is log-lifting, Clay will pick a 60-pounder -- the camp's heaviest -- for himself."I don't ask the officers to do anything I can't do myself," Clay said.But Clay, an ex-Marine who served in Vietnam and helped run the Marines' brig at Parris Island, is setting a standard that some inmates and prison employees say they can't meet.
NEWS
June 16, 2006
Volunteer camp taking registration Camp Make A Difference, a summer camp that involves volunteer projects in the community and recreational activities, is accepting registration. The camp is organized by a partnership between Volunteer Center Serving Howard County and the Columbia Association's summer camp program, and is open to students from grades six through 11. Campers will participate in volunteer projects for the environment, animal welfare, seniors, developmentally disabled people and the poor.
NEWS
June 16, 2006
Volunteer camp taking registration Camp Make A Difference, a summer camp that involves volunteer projects in the community and recreational activities, is accepting registration. The camp is organized by a partnership between Volunteer Center Serving Howard County and the Columbia Association's summer camp program, and is open to students from grades six through 11. Campers will participate in volunteer projects for the environment, animal welfare, seniors, developmentally disabled people and the poor.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO SUN | July 31, 2005
For Martha Moore, one highlight of the nature camps she has been running at the Howard County Conservancy this summer has been coaxing a little girl to touch a bug. The girl was afraid of bugs when she started the week-long camp, Moore said. But once she got over her fear and touched an Australian walking stick, she became fascinated. She even started a bug collection, Moore said. "Everything is based on what they can see, what they can do, with nature," Moore said. The conservancy, a private, nonprofit, 232-acre nature preserve off Route 99, opened the Gudelsky Environmental Education Center last month.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
Carlos Gray was less than thrilled when he figured out that the Northeast Baltimore camp program his mother runs was trying to sneak school work into fun. But by the end of last summer, after answering questions like "What's 5 times 5?" every time he caught a beach ball from a friend, Carlos knew his multiplication tables and was ready to start third grade. The beach-ball math game is one way that camps, parents and school systems are trying to fight the "summer slide." Research shows that without reinforcement over the summer of what they've learned, students can lose up to two months of skills in reading and math by the time they head back to school in the fall.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2004
Maryland's fiscal dilemma over the past three years has been too few dollars and too many needy children, but Howard County's problem this summer has been the reverse. County social services officials expect to spend only 10 percent of the $100,000 in combined state and county money they received for summer camp programs. Only 15 children participated. "That seems to be really poor. You mean there was money available for summer camp that wasn't used? Oh, my God!" said Gerald M. Richman, a social services board member, when he learned of the unused funds at a board meeting this week.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
Area colleges and universities have long known that summer camps are a good way to fill vacant campus space during the slow season. And they're finding an added benefit: recruitment. "A lot of our programs focus on attracting young people to the campus who maybe have never stepped foot on a college campus before," said Marsha Logan, administrative specialist for the Office of Continuing Studies at Morgan State University. "It gives them an idea of what being on a campus is like. And it starts them thinking about going to college - and maybe making Morgan their choice."
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
Squeezed in among nine other children seated at a large round table, 11-year-old Alex Larson vies for the attention of the two teachers in his colorful classroom. When his turn arrives, Alex stands and begins to move his hands quickly and systematically, the movements becoming larger as his excitement grows. Few sounds escape his lips, save an occasional squeal of enthusiasm. In his way, Alex is reading aloud. He is a participant in the Harry Potter summer reading camp at Western Maryland College in Westminster.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | October 26, 1994
Prisoners over 32, take note: You, too, might be able to reduce your prison time by marching in formation, running long distance and submitting to the taunts of boot camp instructors.State corrections officials this month quietly raised the eligible age for the Herman L. Toulson Correctional Boot Camp in Jessup to 35 -- a decade older than participants could be when the camp opened in 1990. That change continues a gradual march away from the philosophy that boot camps are just for young, less serious offenders who could be "shocked" into lawful behavior with a military-style regimen.
EXPLORE
By Allison Eatough | February 1, 2013
When Stephanie Dignan left her job as a financial adviser to start her own fitness business, she had no idea she was about to change hundreds of lives. Just four months earlier, the Glenelg High School and University of Maryland graduate began teaching boot camp classes at a local gym. “I thought, 'Why not? I'll do it for fun,'” Dignan says. But that fun quickly developed into a passion -- one Dignan wanted to pursue full time. So in 2008, she launched her solo venture, The Boot Camp Girl LLC, with hopes of taking her boot camp skills and fitness ideas to clients across Howard County.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - The huge swath of green that is the main quadrangle of the University of Maryland, College Park swallows up the summertime population of this campus without any effort. A few months ago, it was busy with students hurrying between buildings. Now it is the definition of the lazy days of summer. One of the few figures present on a brilliant day of sunshine is Mark Schiller, 21, lying shirtless next to the pools that cascade down the middle of the quad, next to his bicycle and backpack, reading a book.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2000
A 29-year-old inmate serving time on a cocaine conviction collapsed at Maryland's adult boot camp in Jessup and died yesterday morning on his way to breakfast after a physical workout. Leonard Vines of the 3100 block of McElderry St. in East Baltimore was pronounced dead at Laurel Regional Hospital at 7: 41 a.m., about an hour after collapsing at the Herman L. Toulson Correctional Boot Camp. A Maryland Division of Correction spokesman said Vines had stretched, done 20 push-ups, run 1 1/2 miles and done 50 sit-ups.
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