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By Scott Calvert | March 27, 2003
Even in the desert of Kuwait, surrounded by the bravery of fellow soldiers, 1st Lt. Claus Kreinschroeder marvels at the fortitude of an 11-year-old girl. "She has never been shown anything but love," he says of his daughter, Alyssa. Maybe it's love that has enabled her to get through her mother's cancer, and now, her father's absence. Alyssa might not recognize her dad now, with his shaved head. But she knows the generosity and quick wit he has displayed here in a staging area called Camp Pennsylvania.
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By Scott Calvert | March 27, 2003
Even in the desert of Kuwait, surrounded by the bravery of fellow soldiers, 1st Lt. Claus Kreinschroeder marvels at the fortitude of an 11-year-old girl. "She has never been shown anything but love," he says of his daughter, Alyssa. Maybe it's love that has enabled her to get through her mother's cancer, and now, her father's absence. Alyssa might not recognize her dad now, with his shaved head. But she knows the generosity and quick wit he has displayed here in a staging area called Camp Pennsylvania.
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By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 20, 2003
CAMP PENNSYLVANIA, Kuwait - Word of the airstrikes on Iraq came as a surprise to some officers with the Army's 101st Airborne Division this morning. Here at Camp Pennsylvania, 30 miles from Iraq, commanders got the news from a reporter as they awoke at 6:30 a.m: The U.S. military struck Baghdad with Tomahawk cruise missiles and precision bombs from F-117 fighter-bombers in the opening salvo of military action to oust Saddam Hussein. But at Camp Pennsylvania, the humdrum rhythms of the camp made it seem like any other day. A line of soldiers out for a run resembled a centipede in the hazy distance.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 20, 2003
CAMP PENNSYLVANIA, Kuwait - Word of the airstrikes on Iraq came as a surprise to some officers with the Army's 101st Airborne Division this morning. Here at Camp Pennsylvania, 30 miles from Iraq, commanders got the news from a reporter as they awoke at 6:30 a.m: The U.S. military struck Baghdad with Tomahawk cruise missiles and precision bombs from F-117 fighter-bombers in the opening salvo of military action to oust Saddam Hussein. But at Camp Pennsylvania, the humdrum rhythms of the camp made it seem like any other day. A line of soldiers out for a run resembled a centipede in the hazy distance.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2000
WOODWARD, Pa. -- It's move-in day at Woodward Camp, and the veteran boys in Cabin 18-B are observing time-honored camp traditions: swapping stories about how to dodge the cabin-inspecting "mini-moms," laughing about the French-speaking camper they taught to say "I am a sex machine" last year. The guys are also talking sports. But there's no mention of Kobe Bryant, the White Sox, or going out for the football team. This being Woodward Camp -- the world's biggest "extreme sports" camp -- they're talking nollies and grinds, about ways they've bent gravity on Woodward's 425 acres of dirt moguls, wooden ramps, and foam-rubber pits, about the joys of being outlaw athletes in training.
NEWS
By MIKE KLINGAMAN and MIKE KLINGAMAN,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1998
Bobby Sabelhaus graduated from McDonogh School with a golden arm and all his dreams within reach. Considered one of the top three quarterbacks in the country, he was confident, charismatic, driven -- a cinch for stardom in college football.The game plan went awry.Three years later, Sabelhaus, 21, is scrambling to salvage a shred of that promising career. A junior, he has yet to take a snap from center. The Owings Mills resident has bounced from college to college, and from coast to coast -- from the University of Florida to a junior college in California to West Virginia University.
FEATURES
By Scott Calvert | March 17, 2003
Camp Pennsylvania, Kuwait - Thousands of miles from the United States, in a crowded Army tent he shares with about 60 other soldiers, Pfc. Jacob Ruble studies photographs of his wife Julia. Hers is the face he longs to see. The pictures were taken last summer, when Jake was away from Julia for the first time, when he knew for certain he'd be back. In one, she wears blue jeans and a bikini top and stands with her hand on her hip. In another, she is putting up her shoulder-length blond hair.
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By SCOTT CALVERT | April 9, 2003
Before the 101st Airborne Division moved into combat in Iraq, Capt. Shane Dentinger didn't know what to expect of the days ahead. "If, or when, that first soldier gets shot, how are the other soldiers going to react?" he said while hand-washing his clothes in a bucket, still at a staging area in Kuwait. "How am I going to react?" The 101st is an air assault force, which means helicopters carry infantry soldiers into battle zones. The division's worst fighting may be yet to come. Dentinger is a muscular 6-foot-3.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2003
FORT KNOX, Ky. - An Army investigating officer recommended yesterday that Sgt. Asan Akbar, a Los Angeles soldier accused of a grenade and rifle attack on his superior officers in Kuwait, stand trial at a general court-martial. Lt. Col. Patrick Reinert ruled swiftly after the close of a weeklong preliminary hearing that the March 23 ambush was "a surprise attack executed by stealth." During the hearing, Army prosecutors and defense lawyers argued about whether Akbar deliberately planned the attack or whether he was being falsely accused because of his deeply held Islamic religious beliefs.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 15, 2003
CAMP PENNSYLVANIA, Kuwait - The camp has power and water, but alas, no washing machines. With dirty clothes piling up, some soldiers have made their own Maytags. Just fill a tub with water and scrub. No tub? Put a trash bag inside a cardboard box and fill. Soldiers here have a second, more luxurious option: free drop-off laundry service. Hundreds of soldiers have set aside suspicions of anything tied to the Army and lugged their stuff to the laundry tent. Indians hired by the military truck the clothes over the desert to near Kuwait City.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2000
WOODWARD, Pa. -- It's move-in day at Woodward Camp, and the veteran boys in Cabin 18-B are observing time-honored camp traditions: swapping stories about how to dodge the cabin-inspecting "mini-moms," laughing about the French-speaking camper they taught to say "I am a sex machine" last year. The guys are also talking sports. But there's no mention of Kobe Bryant, the White Sox, or going out for the football team. This being Woodward Camp -- the world's biggest "extreme sports" camp -- they're talking nollies and grinds, about ways they've bent gravity on Woodward's 425 acres of dirt moguls, wooden ramps, and foam-rubber pits, about the joys of being outlaw athletes in training.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
To make it to the top in World Wrestling Entertainment, an intriguing story line is even more important than the requisite bulging biceps. The freakishly massive wrestler known simply as Batista, for example, has become professional wrestling's hottest fan favorite because of a story that has been months in the making on the WWE cable show Raw: Batista, part of a group of wrestlers he believed were mentoring him, breaks away on his own when he realizes they...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 29, 2003
SOMEWHERE IN SOUTHERN IRAQ - So much oil, yet so little gas. When the U.S. Army needs to refuel a convoy of several hundred trucks in middle-of-nowhere Iraq, it's not a simple chore, or a quick one. A caravan of 101st Airborne Division trucks pulled into one Army desert refueling station, dubbed Exxon, at 6:30 a.m. yesterday for a fill-er-up of diesel. It would turn out to be a half-day-long affair - an eternity for soldiers eager to head north to reinforce those who have gone ahead, but not such a long time for the Army.
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