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NEWS
October 7, 2004
IT TURNS OUT NOT SO many of the 550 men still held prisoner at the U.S. base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, are likely "the worst of the worst," deserving to be "dealt with as people who have engaged in mass murder," as Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has said. Or "killers," as President Bush has called them all. Their years of detention provide a good lesson as to why U.S. and international laws presume innocence, and set guidelines on how long people may be held without charges, access to lawyers or basic human rights.
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NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 26, 2007
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba -- Amid days of secret Pentagon proceedings against those suspected of being al-Qaida terrorists, the U.S. military is reopening its war-crimes court today with a single charge against an alleged war-on-terror foot soldier with no explicit links to the Sept. 11 attacks. Australian David Hicks, 31, is slated this afternoon to become the first Guantanamo captive to appear before a newly constituted Military Commission. In a nine-page charge sheet, he is accused of providing material support for terrorism.
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NEWS
By Michael Posner | June 5, 2005
FOR MANY around the world, the detention facility at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has become one of the most prominent, negative symbols of America's departure from the rule of law since 9/11. Camp Delta, as the prison on Guantanamo is called, holds more than 520 men from about 40 countries. Many of these people have been detained there for more than three years; none has been given any indication of when, or even if, he will be released. The U.S. government has classified all of the detainees as "enemy combatants."
NEWS
By Michael Posner | June 5, 2005
FOR MANY around the world, the detention facility at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has become one of the most prominent, negative symbols of America's departure from the rule of law since 9/11. Camp Delta, as the prison on Guantanamo is called, holds more than 520 men from about 40 countries. Many of these people have been detained there for more than three years; none has been given any indication of when, or even if, he will be released. The U.S. government has classified all of the detainees as "enemy combatants."
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - Navy Cmdr. Sheldon Stuchell always imagined that if al-Qaida were going to pull a prison break on Guantanamo Bay, the terrorists would sneak up the Cuban coastline. He pictured enemy agents slinking toward the fortress in submarines with periscopes up, trolling the Caribbean waters for Camp Delta's weakest link. But Stuchell, a Navy Reserve officer who spent much of last year overseeing external prison security, may have been off the mark. If authorities are correct, it appears the soft spot was not outside.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 2003
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba - American interrogators here have come up with a few new weapons as they try to pry loose the secrets of prisoners captured on the battlefields of Afghanistan. "It could be cupcakes, it could be Twinkies, it could even be a McDonald's hamburger," says Warrant Officer James Kluck, who, as the ranking food service officer, helps supply some of the unlikely ammunition. "Sometimes, they go up on the base and get [the prisoner] a Happy Meal." A McDonald's Happy Meal?
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
For 10 months, Army Chaplain James J. "Yousef" Yee was the designated Muslim confidant for the 660 prisoners of Camp Delta, the Pentagon's seaside Cuban prison for alleged al-Qaida foot soldiers captured in Afghanistan. He listened to their gripes, counseled them in matters of faith, and passed along requests for special dietary and religious needs. While American interrogators sometimes sought his advice on what incentives might loosen the lips of prisoners, Yee made it clear that he wasn't in the business of informing on his charges.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 26, 2007
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba -- Amid days of secret Pentagon proceedings against those suspected of being al-Qaida terrorists, the U.S. military is reopening its war-crimes court today with a single charge against an alleged war-on-terror foot soldier with no explicit links to the Sept. 11 attacks. Australian David Hicks, 31, is slated this afternoon to become the first Guantanamo captive to appear before a newly constituted Military Commission. In a nine-page charge sheet, he is accused of providing material support for terrorism.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 2004
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVY BASE, Cuba - A Sudanese man who allegedly handled Osama bin Laden's payroll appeared before a U.S. tribunal here yesterday, while the government's chief war crimes prosecutor said the next batch of al-Qaida suspects to face military trial would include militants known to ordinary Americans. "The American people will recognize the names of these people," said Army Col. Robert L. Swann, revealing for the first time plans to charge nine more captives of the war on terror in "the next few months."
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - Under mounting pressure from foreign embassies and Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, the Pentagon announced yesterday details of how military tribunals would be conducted for detainees at the U.S. Naval Base on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Officials also outlined a wide range of criminal charges that could be filed against detainees, including murder and assault of civilians during the war in Afghanistan, and the taking of hostages and pillaging of communities when U.S. troops waged war against the Taliban after the Sept.
NEWS
October 7, 2004
IT TURNS OUT NOT SO many of the 550 men still held prisoner at the U.S. base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, are likely "the worst of the worst," deserving to be "dealt with as people who have engaged in mass murder," as Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has said. Or "killers," as President Bush has called them all. Their years of detention provide a good lesson as to why U.S. and international laws presume innocence, and set guidelines on how long people may be held without charges, access to lawyers or basic human rights.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - Navy Cmdr. Sheldon Stuchell always imagined that if al-Qaida were going to pull a prison break on Guantanamo Bay, the terrorists would sneak up the Cuban coastline. He pictured enemy agents slinking toward the fortress in submarines with periscopes up, trolling the Caribbean waters for Camp Delta's weakest link. But Stuchell, a Navy Reserve officer who spent much of last year overseeing external prison security, may have been off the mark. If authorities are correct, it appears the soft spot was not outside.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
For 10 months, Army Chaplain James J. "Yousef" Yee was the designated Muslim confidant for the 660 prisoners of Camp Delta, the Pentagon's seaside Cuban prison for alleged al-Qaida foot soldiers captured in Afghanistan. He listened to their gripes, counseled them in matters of faith, and passed along requests for special dietary and religious needs. While American interrogators sometimes sought his advice on what incentives might loosen the lips of prisoners, Yee made it clear that he wasn't in the business of informing on his charges.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 2003
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba - American interrogators here have come up with a few new weapons as they try to pry loose the secrets of prisoners captured on the battlefields of Afghanistan. "It could be cupcakes, it could be Twinkies, it could even be a McDonald's hamburger," says Warrant Officer James Kluck, who, as the ranking food service officer, helps supply some of the unlikely ammunition. "Sometimes, they go up on the base and get [the prisoner] a Happy Meal." A McDonald's Happy Meal?
NEWS
By W. David Myers and W. David Myers,Los Angeles Times | December 24, 2006
Guantanamo and the Abuse of Presidential Power Joseph Margulies Simon & Schuster/ 322 pages/ $25 The number of books treating the war on terror and the Iraq war grows exponentially. Increasingly these books focus on the strategic flaws that may now be leading to catastrophe. Lost in the shuffle is a smaller-scale tragedy that may eventually wound the United States as deeply as the injury inflicted by a looming military debacle in the Mideast and Central Asia. As Joseph Margulies shows in his riveting Guantanamo and the Abuse of Presidential Power, dealing with "enemy combatants" has become an unprecedented and dangerous experiment in unrestrained presidential power that, if unchecked, will fundamentally weaken the individual protections offered by the Constitution.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 26, 2003
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba - The sun has not yet begun to rise over the Caribbean Sea when Selvin Butler Fairweather sets out on what must rank among the world's most unusual commutes. The hourlong journey takes the supply manager from his home in the city of Guantanamo, Cuba, across a minefield, past coils of barbed wire and through a Cuban military checkpoint to his job at this American base. The 76-year-old Butler is one of five Cubans still working at Guantanamo Bay more than four decades after Washington severed diplomatic relations with the government of Fidel Castro.
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