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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2011
A civilian aircraft flew in restricted airspace Friday near Camp David in Frederick County, the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, said in a statement. An F-15E fighter jet intercepted the Piper plane at about 4:45 p.m., NORAD said. NORAD said that the plane was out of radio communication and that it was escorted to an airport near Martinsburg, W.Va. President Barack Obama was not at Camp David at the time. The airspace over the presidential retreat was limited because he was scheduled to fly there Friday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Cozy Restaurant, an 85-year-old Thurmont eatery that claimed to be the oldest restaurant in Maryland still operated by its founding family, has closed. News of the restaurant's closing was first reported Monday in the Frederick News-Post, which said the restaurant's last day of operation was Sunday. On Tuesday, the News-Post reported that Cozy owed about $180,000 in back taxes. The restaurant was part of Cozy Village, a Thurmont tourist camp established in 1929 by Wilbur Freeze.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
If you haven't yet felt pity for Secretary of State John Kerry, you will after seeing "Camp David," the new play by Lawrence Wright at Arena Stage about the most famous attempt to broker peace in the Middle East. Every issue that has frustrated Kerry lately in his heroic bid to get the parties moving toward a solution -- settlements, Palestinian rights, etc. -- dogged President Jimmy Carter when he enticed President Anwar Sadat and Prime Minister Menachem Begin to Camp David in September 1978 to hash out some sort of agreement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
If you haven't yet felt pity for Secretary of State John Kerry, you will after seeing "Camp David," the new play by Lawrence Wright at Arena Stage about the most famous attempt to broker peace in the Middle East. Every issue that has frustrated Kerry lately in his heroic bid to get the parties moving toward a solution -- settlements, Palestinian rights, etc. -- dogged President Jimmy Carter when he enticed President Anwar Sadat and Prime Minister Menachem Begin to Camp David in September 1978 to hash out some sort of agreement.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
Government sharpshooters are taking aim at hundreds of white-tailed deer in the national park surrounding the Camp David presidential retreat in Western Maryland. The move to reduce the deer population comes after nearly three decades of research and opposition from animal-rights advocates. Acting Park Superintendent Sean Denniston said shooting in Catoctin Mountain Park near Thurmont began Monday afternoon and will continue most weekday afternoons and nights through mid-March. Large sections of the park will be periodically closed, he said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
In the little town of Thurmont (population not quite 6,200), the recession has taken a heavy toll on Main Street, but things are picking up as residents prepare for next month's G8 Summit at nearby Camp David. The Cozy Country Inn has been busy booking reservations, and Rocky's New York Pizza is scheduling extra employee shifts to prep more dough and sauce. The county sheriff's department is preparing contingency plans for large-scale protests and telling deputies to expect hours of overtime.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
A state park will be closed to the public for three days next month while world leaders gather nearby at the Camp David presidential retreat for the G-8 Summit, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The move is highly unusual, and may be without precedent. The closure of Cunningham Falls State Park in Frederick County, which has two public campgrounds, was requested by the U.S. Secret Service because of "security concerns," Lt. Col. Chris Bushman, a DNR spokesman, said Monday.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | June 25, 2009
WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama holds the keys to Camp David, the sprawling retreat in the Maryland mountains that would be the envy of any busy professional looking for a break from the pressures of a harried workweek. But facing a problem that other parents can relate to, he seldom finds time to go there. The reason, according to the president: His daughters' schedules take priority. "We love Camp David, and we'll probably end up spending quite a bit of time up there during this summer," Obama said during a White House interview Wednesday with The Baltimore Sun and five other newspapers.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | November 23, 1993
THURMONT -- Here, where the hustle and bustle of Baltimore and the mercilessness of Washington's workweek give way to a slower sense of pace, sweeping vistas, thick woodlands, waterfalls, trout streams and hiking paths, lies a perfect place for presidents to get away from it all.But even though Camp David's only a half-hour away by helicopter, President Clinton has largely resisted its temptations. He has made the trip only three times in 10 months. But Mr. Clinton is scheduled to come to the retreat with his family for at least two days of relaxation during the Thanksgiving holiday.
NEWS
By Jim Anderson | July 11, 2000
WASHINGTON -- If history is to repeat itself at the Camp David Middle East summit, the participants are in for an exhilarating roller-coaster ride of small triumphs, sudden disappointments, mind-numbing details and exhausting debating sessions over arcane issues and definitions. That's how it was 22 years ago, when President Jimmy Carter summoned Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat to the Camp David presidential retreat for a summit that lasted 13 days and came within minutes of crashing failure.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 24, 2013
In some important ways, the last month or so has seen some impressive advances for President Barack Obama. Under ordinary circumstances, his success so far at staring down Syrian dictator Bashar Assad over chemical weapons and then his rebuff of the House Republicans' demand to defund his health-care insurance law would be recognized as political triumphs. Instead, the president finds himself on the defensive because of the botched rollout of "Obamacare. " Ironically, the earliest indications that enrollment for the insurance was not going smoothly were overshadowed by the dismal and reckless effort of the law's bitter foes to kill it. The tea party-driven decision to hold the executive branch hostage by balking at passing a budget and raising the federal debt limit was a classic case of stepping on one's own most advantageous story - the technological failure of the Obamacare rollout.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | July 17, 2013
I'm walking from Camp David to the White House starting Friday - 100 miles in the July heat. I'm doing this to honor the 19 firefighters who died fighting a wildfire near Prescott, Ariz., on June 30. These men died particularly horrifying deaths doing particularly heroic deeds. I'm also walking to honor the 50 men and women who died during the oil tanker train explosion this month in Lac-Megantic, Canada. My eight-day walk - joined by scores of other Marylanders and citizens from around the nation - will serve to memorialize these people as victims of tragically interconnected factors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nicholas Page | October 4, 2012
Sometimes I forget the "X Factor" is a reality show. The first minute was just erratic scenes of contestants crying and arguing in beautiful scenery like the beach. If I didn't know any better I would think that I had accidentally recorded my grandma's daytime soap opera. That said, I think they should rename the show "As The Factor Turns"; because in this episode we got more than our share of drama. We also got another killer performance by Maryland's David Correy. All the contestants made their way to Miami ready to live out their dream.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
In a standoff that might require delicate diplomacy to resolve, officials in Western Maryland are pressing the federal government to reconsider its refusal to help pay for local security costs for this week's G-8 summit at Camp David. Local police say they are ready for expected protests of the Group of Eight industrialized nations gathering that begins Friday and ends Saturday night — the highest-profile event held at the presidential retreat in years — but they are not eager to pick up the tab. They say overtime and equipment could cost tens of thousands of dollars — a big hit to small-town budgets.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
For eight years, Renee Gordon's son, Alex, has been attending Camp Greentop, a summer getaway in Maryland's Catoctin Mountains for people with disabilities. Now Gordon is now spearheading a campaign with Michael Hettleman to raise $1 million for the Baltimore-based League for People with Disabilities, which runs the camp. The money will be used to help families pay for the programs, which cost about $260 a day, and to provide training for counselors. "The camp provides the most incredible experience," Gordon said.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for partly sunny skies, with highs expected in the upper 50s and gusty winds. Lows in the mid 30s are expected tonight. TRAFFIC Check our traffic map for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... O'Malley says he won't call session until leaders have a deal : Gov. Martin O'Malley says he won't call a special session of the General Assembly to fix what he and many other Democrats see as a devastating hole in the state budget until legislative leaders agree on a plan to fix it. Dance says he supports board's decision to build school in Mays Chapel : The school, he said, is needed to relieve overcrowding.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | July 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- When summer sunlight hits, the museum-like White House can seem more confining than ever. So with temperatures high, President Bush is continuing a routine that has become a notable feature of his presidency: the weekend getaway to Camp David. Today, Bush is departing for his 124th visit as president to the secluded compound in the Catoctin Mountains. Since his inauguration, he has spent all or part of 386 days at Camp David, according to records kept by Mark Knoller of CBS News in Washington, considered an authoritative source on such statistics.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
In the little town of Thurmont (population not quite 6,200), the recession has taken a heavy toll on Main Street, but things are picking up as residents prepare for next month's G8 Summit at nearby Camp David. The Cozy Country Inn has been busy booking reservations, and Rocky's New York Pizza is scheduling extra employee shifts to prep more dough and sauce. The county sheriff's department is preparing contingency plans for large-scale protests and telling deputies to expect hours of overtime.
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