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Camille Claudel

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By Lou Cedrone | September 24, 1990
''Camille Claudel,'' showing at the Charles, is the story of Claudel's very long descent into madness. The film, two and one-half hours long, should run no more than 90 minutes, but director Bruno Nuyten apparently wanted us to share in all this agony, which we do.Claudel, who lived from 1864 to 1943, was collaborator then mistress to Auguste Rodin, the French sculptor. He already had a family, but that didn't deter Claudel who, when Rodin refused to leave his wife and children, began her ride to hell.
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By Mike Giuliano | July 13, 2011
Playwrights sculpt language. Their linguistic craftsmanship, which will be on ample display this summer during the 30th annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival, is certainly present in Marilyn Millstone's "The Sculptress," right now at Fells Point Corner Theatre. Millstone's biographical play concerns Camille Claudel, the French sculptor who served as the muse for her much older lover, the 19th-century sculptor Auguste Rodin. Her career was overshadowed by his, and she never psychologically recovered from the end of their love affair.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 20, 1990
Mon dieu and zut alors! Zee Franch, zey are a funny peeple, non?No. They're not very funny at all in "Camille Claudel" (opening at the Charles today), the two-hour film biography of the French sculptress who slept with and fought with Auguste Rodin and ended her days with a three-decade stint in the madhouse. There's enough artistic suffering in this film -- crying and gnashing and freezing and going mad and being cold and dirty -- to stuff a Christmas goose with.Still, it's not quite as overdramatized as it might have been, nor as high toned.
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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
Mia Rollow shaped lumps of pliable clay into a life-sized sculpture of a human head while she was a senior at Wilde Like High School in Columbia. Her teacher, Alan Cohen, shaped Rollow's talent in more subtle ways, guiding her methods and encouraging her ideas. A joint exhibit of the Howard County Board of Education and Baltimore Clayworks this month explores the making of sculpture and the making of artists by displaying together clay art produced by students and by their teachers. Works by Rollow and Cohen are on display with other Howard County teacher-student pairings at the Clayworks gallery in Baltimore, while creations by Clayworks teachers and their students can be viewed at the Howard County Board of Education Gallery in Ellicott City.
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By Anna Quindlen | June 27, 1991
A POSTCARD from a reader (male) asks the question:"Has any corpus femalus ever contrived and composed any work of art remotely qualified to be placed within 100 meters of the great masters: Da Vinci, Titian, Velasquez, Botticelli, Dante, Shakespeare, Michelangelo, Picasso, Goya, Eisenhower, MacArthur, Caesar, Alexander the Great, Darius, Genghis Khan, Sala-deen, Shelley, Milton, Byron, Einstein . . ."(I particularly like the juxtaposition of Goya and Eisenhower.)A co-worker (female) has drafted a reply in a white heat of indignation:"Don't forget Sappho, Virginia Woolf, the Brontes, George Sand, George Eliot, Eudora Welty, Camille Claudel (whose work was lifted by Auguste Rodin)
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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
Mia Rollow shaped lumps of pliable clay into a life-sized sculpture of a human head while she was a senior at Wilde Like High School in Columbia. Her teacher, Alan Cohen, shaped Rollow's talent in more subtle ways, guiding her methods and encouraging her ideas. A joint exhibit of the Howard County Board of Education and Baltimore Clayworks this month explores the making of sculpture and the making of artists by displaying together clay art produced by students and by their teachers. Works by Rollow and Cohen are on display with other Howard County teacher-student pairings at the Clayworks gallery in Baltimore, while creations by Clayworks teachers and their students can be viewed at the Howard County Board of Education Gallery in Ellicott City.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | July 13, 2011
Playwrights sculpt language. Their linguistic craftsmanship, which will be on ample display this summer during the 30th annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival, is certainly present in Marilyn Millstone's "The Sculptress," right now at Fells Point Corner Theatre. Millstone's biographical play concerns Camille Claudel, the French sculptor who served as the muse for her much older lover, the 19th-century sculptor Auguste Rodin. Her career was overshadowed by his, and she never psychologically recovered from the end of their love affair.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 28, 1992
When Sir John Gielgud directed Richard Burton in "Hamlet" three decades ago, he paused after one of Burton's monologues and asked, "Which do you want to be, dear boy -- an actor or a movie star?" To which Burton, then in his rafter-shaking prime, replied, "Both!"Daniel Day-Lewis has reached the same crossroads at 35. He won the Oscar, a prize that eluded Burton, for a bravura performance as handicapped author Christy Brown in "My Left Foot." As soon as audiences see him charging through the North Carolina woods in "The Last of the Mohicans," which opened last weekend, his chest bare and shoulder-length hair caressed by the wind, he may be stuck with stardom as well.
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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
With an award-winning play in hand, the Colonial Players turned a reading into much more — delivering a compelling study of a female artist that touched on issues such as women's independence and the nature of madness. The Aug. 21 read-through of Evan Guilford-Blake's "An Uncommon Language" offered a look at the winning play in the players' biennial Promising Playwright Contest. Artistic director Beverly van Joolen said there were 102 applicants whose works were read before narrowing the list "to five extraordinary finalists, and the committee was unanimous in its choice of Guilford-Blake's play that really glowed.
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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Traditionally, this is the time when we reflect on the past year's highs from a variety of stellar acting and musical performances by established local groups in Anne Arundel County. In 2011, we also welcomed two new theater companies of surprisingly high caliber and had a few more surprises that added excitement. A totally unexpected 2011 high was offered by Colonial Players at their biennial Promising Playwright Contest, won by playwright Evan Guilford-Blake. His "Uncommon Language," loosely based on the controversy surrounding Camille Claudel's contributions to the work of Rodin, was sensitively interpreted by a skilled cast of eight actors in a spellbinding reading.
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By Anna Quindlen | June 27, 1991
A POSTCARD from a reader (male) asks the question:"Has any corpus femalus ever contrived and composed any work of art remotely qualified to be placed within 100 meters of the great masters: Da Vinci, Titian, Velasquez, Botticelli, Dante, Shakespeare, Michelangelo, Picasso, Goya, Eisenhower, MacArthur, Caesar, Alexander the Great, Darius, Genghis Khan, Sala-deen, Shelley, Milton, Byron, Einstein . . ."(I particularly like the juxtaposition of Goya and Eisenhower.)A co-worker (female) has drafted a reply in a white heat of indignation:"Don't forget Sappho, Virginia Woolf, the Brontes, George Sand, George Eliot, Eudora Welty, Camille Claudel (whose work was lifted by Auguste Rodin)
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By Lou Cedrone | September 24, 1990
''Camille Claudel,'' showing at the Charles, is the story of Claudel's very long descent into madness. The film, two and one-half hours long, should run no more than 90 minutes, but director Bruno Nuyten apparently wanted us to share in all this agony, which we do.Claudel, who lived from 1864 to 1943, was collaborator then mistress to Auguste Rodin, the French sculptor. He already had a family, but that didn't deter Claudel who, when Rodin refused to leave his wife and children, began her ride to hell.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 20, 1990
Mon dieu and zut alors! Zee Franch, zey are a funny peeple, non?No. They're not very funny at all in "Camille Claudel" (opening at the Charles today), the two-hour film biography of the French sculptress who slept with and fought with Auguste Rodin and ended her days with a three-decade stint in the madhouse. There's enough artistic suffering in this film -- crying and gnashing and freezing and going mad and being cold and dirty -- to stuff a Christmas goose with.Still, it's not quite as overdramatized as it might have been, nor as high toned.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2007
Rebecca Bafford has been working for more than a year to bring a traveling exhibition of art by Auguste Rodin to Howard Community College, but when workers rolled the first bronze sculpture into the college's arts center last week, she said she stopped in her tracks at the sight of it. "I think it is going to hit a lot of people with the intensity that it did for me," said Bafford, director of the college's art gallery. "It is a powerful reminder of what sculpture can do." The exhibition of 35 of the famous French artist's bronze sculptures, which belong to the California-based Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, is the type of museum-quality show the college was envisioning when it built the Peter & Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center in 2006.
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