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Cameron Crowe

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By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 14, 2005
Toronto-- --Cameron Crowe first came to fame as a rock-music writer for music magazines in the '70s, when he was still in his teens. When he wrote his first screenplay, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, he nagged the producers about which tunes to put in the soundtrack. The signature moment in his directing debut, Say Anything ..., had John Cusack standing outside a girl's window, playing Peter Gabriel's "In Your Eyes" to her on his boombox. The guy married a musician, Nancy Wilson of the rock group Heart.
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By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 14, 2005
Toronto-- --Cameron Crowe first came to fame as a rock-music writer for music magazines in the '70s, when he was still in his teens. When he wrote his first screenplay, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, he nagged the producers about which tunes to put in the soundtrack. The signature moment in his directing debut, Say Anything ..., had John Cusack standing outside a girl's window, playing Peter Gabriel's "In Your Eyes" to her on his boombox. The guy married a musician, Nancy Wilson of the rock group Heart.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 16, 2001
Cameron Crowe, the phenomenally successful author of Fast Times at Ridgemont High and writer-director of Say Anything and Jerry Maguire, has been doing double duty this month -- promoting both Vanilla Sky, his big-star remake of the Spanish movie Open Your Eyes, and the director's-edition DVD of his most personal film to date, Almost Famous. And though Crowe is the only major movie writer-director who started out as a teen reporter for Rolling Stone, he's not an MTV addict but a loopy traditionalist.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 29, 2002
The jaunty little man in the Tyrolean hat could do it all. With Some Like It Hot, he wrote and directed one of history's funniest films. With Double Indemnity, he wrote and directed the film noir against which all other film noir is measured. With Sunset Boulevard, he wrote and directed a brutal indictment of Hollywood myopia that was also one of the tautest, leanest, most evocative tragedies ever put on film. Billy Wilder, the closest thing to a Renaissance man behind the camera that Hollywood has produced, died Wednesday of pneumonia at his home in Beverly Hills.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 22, 2000
It's hard not to like "Almost Famous," Cameron Crowe's cheerful semi-autobiographical movie about a young journalist writing his first cover story for Rolling Stone. The movie is disarmingly sweet, a picaresque journey through the wilds of rock and roll during the 1970s, after idealism died at Altamont but before rock went entirely corporate. Patrick Fugit turns in an appealingly bland performance as William, Crowe's alter-ego, who at 15 is assigned by Rolling Stone to go on tour with an emerging band called Stillwater.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | January 17, 1998
A typically solid performance from Tom Cruise, a star-making performance from Renee Zellweger and a scene-stealing (and Oscar-winning) performance from Cuba Gooding Jr. are only three of the many reasons to watch "Jerry Maguire" (8 p.m.-10: 30 p.m., Showtime).Cruise is Maguire, a sports agent who suffers a moment of moral clarity and pays for it by losing all of his clients -- save for one, an underappreciated (or is it underachieving?) wide receiver named Rod Tidwell (Gooding). With all his eggs suddenly in one basket, Maguire finds himself clawing to put Tidwell on top and re-establish himself in a business that no longer wants any part of him. Zellweger plays the secretary who casts her lot with Maguire and forces him to be the better person she knows he is (the scene where he finally tells her how he feels is one of those classic romantic moments that prove Hollywood magic often has nothing to do with special effects)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 14, 2001
Anyone watching Vanilla Sky who has seen the 1997 Spanish thriller Open Your Eyes will experience an effect painters call "pentimento." The surface has been painted over, but the original design still shows through. And for those who weren't fans of the first movie, this one will register as an instant unpleasant memory. With the blessing of the original moviemaker, Alejandro Amenabar (who went on to make The Others), writer-director Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire, Almost Famous) has applied his own pop veneer to the tale of a handsome, rich young man's comeuppance.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 29, 2002
The jaunty little man in the Tyrolean hat could do it all. With Some Like It Hot, he wrote and directed one of history's funniest films. With Double Indemnity, he wrote and directed the film noir against which all other film noir is measured. With Sunset Boulevard, he wrote and directed a brutal indictment of Hollywood myopia that was also one of the tautest, leanest, most evocative tragedies ever put on film. Billy Wilder, the closest thing to a Renaissance man behind the camera that Hollywood has produced, died Wednesday of pneumonia at his home in Beverly Hills.
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By Los Angeles Times | March 28, 1991
''Past Midnight,'' shooting in Seattle, stars Rutger Hauer and Natasha Richardson in a psychological thriller about a social worker who befriends a client convicted of a heinous murder. Also shooting in Seattle is ''Singles'' for Warner Bros. Cameron Crowe follows "Say Anything" with this romantic comedy that looks at a group of young folks who alternately search for and run from that thing called love. Bridget Fonda, Campbell Scott, Kyra Sedgwick, Shella Kelly, Matt Dillon and Bill Pullman are in the cast.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 24, 1992
The August issue of Movieline has a nifty feature in which 52 notables are asked to name a movie that changed their life.Sharon Stone picks the revival classic "King of Hearts," which taught her that "insanity is just a matter of perspective." Director Cameron Crowe singles out "To Kill a Mockingbird" ("I got completely lost in [that] world"). Jeff Goldblum picks Stanley Kubrick's "Lolita," because it was a movie that was "dark and funny at the same time." Christine Lahti cried for days after seeing "Long Day's Journey into Night."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 16, 2001
Cameron Crowe, the phenomenally successful author of Fast Times at Ridgemont High and writer-director of Say Anything and Jerry Maguire, has been doing double duty this month -- promoting both Vanilla Sky, his big-star remake of the Spanish movie Open Your Eyes, and the director's-edition DVD of his most personal film to date, Almost Famous. And though Crowe is the only major movie writer-director who started out as a teen reporter for Rolling Stone, he's not an MTV addict but a loopy traditionalist.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 14, 2001
Anyone watching Vanilla Sky who has seen the 1997 Spanish thriller Open Your Eyes will experience an effect painters call "pentimento." The surface has been painted over, but the original design still shows through. And for those who weren't fans of the first movie, this one will register as an instant unpleasant memory. With the blessing of the original moviemaker, Alejandro Amenabar (who went on to make The Others), writer-director Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire, Almost Famous) has applied his own pop veneer to the tale of a handsome, rich young man's comeuppance.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 22, 2000
It's hard not to like "Almost Famous," Cameron Crowe's cheerful semi-autobiographical movie about a young journalist writing his first cover story for Rolling Stone. The movie is disarmingly sweet, a picaresque journey through the wilds of rock and roll during the 1970s, after idealism died at Altamont but before rock went entirely corporate. Patrick Fugit turns in an appealingly bland performance as William, Crowe's alter-ego, who at 15 is assigned by Rolling Stone to go on tour with an emerging band called Stillwater.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 17, 1998
A typically solid performance from Tom Cruise, a star-making performance from Renee Zellweger and a scene-stealing (and Oscar-winning) performance from Cuba Gooding Jr. are only three of the many reasons to watch "Jerry Maguire" (8 p.m.-10: 30 p.m., Showtime).Cruise is Maguire, a sports agent who suffers a moment of moral clarity and pays for it by losing all of his clients -- save for one, an underappreciated (or is it underachieving?) wide receiver named Rod Tidwell (Gooding). With all his eggs suddenly in one basket, Maguire finds himself clawing to put Tidwell on top and re-establish himself in a business that no longer wants any part of him. Zellweger plays the secretary who casts her lot with Maguire and forces him to be the better person she knows he is (the scene where he finally tells her how he feels is one of those classic romantic moments that prove Hollywood magic often has nothing to do with special effects)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach and Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
After a disappointing summer where the only real standouts were "The Perfect Storm," which made a star of the weather, and Clint Eastwood's "Space Cowboys," about four geriatric astronauts, movie audiences are left with only one hope: That Hollywood was holding back its best stuff for after Labor Day. At least in recent years, that's been the pattern, as major studios wait until the last three months of the year to release any film with a remote chance...
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
Quite a potpourri on TV tonight, everything from monkeys taking over the world to young adults taking over Seattle, plus a little cross-network visitation between CBS and NBC."Singles" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Writer-director Cameron Crowe's 1992 chronicle of a group of young adults living and loving in Seattle features a top-notch cast, including Bridget Fonda, Matt Dillon, Kyra Sedgwick, Sheila Kelley and Campbell Scott. Even Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder shows up, as a member of Matt Dillon's band.
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