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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 24, 2003
Every new art form has to have its champion, and in the case of photography none was more dedicated, wily or combative than Alfred Stieglitz, the American-born artist-impresario, gallery owner, editor and tireless advocate who almost single-handedly invented modern photography. From the perspective of today's booming photography market, it is difficult to imagine how embattled Stieglitz and his tiny circle of true believers felt at the turn of the 20th century, when their struggle to win recognition of photography as an art became a messianic cause waged with the take-no-prisoners ardor of a military campaign.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
What could be better than watching the Baltimore Orioles pound the New York Yankees 11-3 on a summer's night? How about watching the Orioles pound the Yankees on a telecast on Fox. I'm not here to put down MASN. I've had a lot of pleasure watching the O's this year on our regional sports network. (Read a piece I wrote last week about MASN's winning ratings here .) But I have to say the direction and camera work Saturday night for the Fox telecast featuring Joe Buck on play-by-play and Tim McCarver as analyst were outstanding.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
What could be better than watching the Baltimore Orioles pound the New York Yankees 11-3 on a summer's night? How about watching the Orioles pound the Yankees on a telecast on Fox. I'm not here to put down MASN. I've had a lot of pleasure watching the O's this year on our regional sports network. (Read a piece I wrote last week about MASN's winning ratings here .) But I have to say the direction and camera work Saturday night for the Fox telecast featuring Joe Buck on play-by-play and Tim McCarver as analyst were outstanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Whether it's a Sunday night football game or the third Saturday in May at Pimlico, when NBC Sports floods the zone with members of its A-Team, the telecast is almost always a winner. That was again the case for the 138th Preakness Stakes -- thanks to airtight production, sure-handed direction and enough talent to cover three or four races. Sure, the NBC analysts were wrong in picking Kentucky Derby victor Orb (or, in the case of Michelle Beadle, Mylute) to win the Preakness. But did anyone on the planet have Oxbow?
FEATURES
September 16, 1990
Three Marylanders were among the nominees for one of the more arcane Emmy Awards, camera-video technical direction in a miniseries or special, that were scheduled to be announced late last night in Beverly Hills, Calif.Donna Quante, Helene Haviland and Bill Greenback were cited for their camera work on "Wolftrap Presents Victor Borge: An 80th Birthday Celebration," which aired on PBS. Ms. Quante, who lives in Hampstead and works on "The Cosby Show," has been nominated 10 times for an Emmy and won three times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 1, 2003
Alfred Stieglitz, the embattled genius who practically single-handedly dragged photography into the 20th century, was a tireless writer, publisher and gallery owner as well as a gifted photographer in his own right. Stieglitz wrote or edited hundreds of articles championing the artists he admired -- from photographers Edward Steichen and Paul Strand to painters Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse to sculptor Auguste Rodin. Much of his criticism appeared in Camera Work, the little magazine he established in 1903 to promote his avant-garde ideas and which he continued to publish until 1917.
NEWS
May 6, 1998
THE SUCCESS of "Seinfeld," or any show on the small screen, is fairly simple, in theory at least, and can be described by one word.Character.As Sun television critic David Zurawik pointed outin an analysis of the show, only four situation comedies have topped the Nielsen ratings for at least four seasons: "I Love Lucy" in the '50s, "All in the Family" in the '70s, "The Cosby Show" in the '80s and "Seinfeld" in the '90s.All had a core "family" of strong, distinct personality types. Most important, the characters were appealing even if achingly peculiar.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 28, 1991
That was a pretty good "Monday Night Football" game, huh?During much of last night's Super Bowl telecast on ABC, such was the thought that kept running through my head. This game felt like another of ABC's "Monday Night" telecasts.There was the "MNF" announcing crew of Al Michaels, Dan Dierdorf and Frank Gifford. There was the telling camera work. There was illustrative use of the telestrator. There was even Hank Williams Jr. singing to open the game.ABC covered the game little differently from a normal National Football League telecast.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | October 6, 1996
The !Kung Bushmen of Africa's Kalahari desert are a people trapped by the myths art has created about them. Their unhappy history, and how it was shaped by a series of documentary films, is the subject of a projected PBS series now in development.In the early 1950s a young man named John Marshall traveled to the Kalahari in what was then South West Africa and began shooting what eventually would become some 1 million feet of film documenting the way of life of the indigenous desert people called !
NEWS
By Ray Frager and David Zurawik and Ray Frager and David Zurawik,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2005
Monday Night Football, for 35 years a network staple and a program that once made pop stars of Howard Cosell and "Dandy" Don Meredith, will leave broadcast television after the 2005 season and move to the cable network ESPN. Though Monday Night Football was still a Top 10 program, it had become a money drain for ABC and corporate parent Walt Disney Co. - losing a reported $150 million per year - so the program will move to another Disney property in ESPN. Neither ESPN nor the NFL gave dollar figures in yesterday's announcements, but the rights to Monday Night Football will cost $1.1 billion per year, according to sources cited by the Associated Press.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
I didn't plan to write about ESPN's telecast of the Maryland-Duke game. After a day of wrestling with a controversial post on Fox News anointing Dr. Benjamin Carson the new darling of the right on Sean Hannity's smarmy show, I just wanted some sports viewing pleasure and TV rescue. But Dave O'Brien (play by play), Doris Burke (analysis) and Jeannine Edwards (reporting) did such a fine job that by the middle of the first half I had my notebook out trying to keep up with all the things they were doing right.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
A top city official said Monday that 10 of Baltimore's 83 speed cameras are now operational - a month after the entire network was shut down during a troubled transition to a new vendor. Khalil Zaied, deputy chief of operations for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, also told City Council members during a lunch that about 15 of the city's red light cameras are now working. On Jan. 1, Baltimore's speed and red light camera system experienced a complete shutdown during what city officials called a problematic transition to a new contractor.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
Once again Monday night, TBS came through with superior coverage of Baltimore Orioles playoff baseball. You can read more on what I have said about the broadcast team of Ernie Johnson, Cal Ripken and John Smoltz here . Ripken seemed a little less engaged Monday night, but maybe the grind is getting to him. Kidding -- he's the Iron Man, and all three were again fine in Game 2. Smoltz was better than fine. He was razor sharp in his analysis, as when he explained what happens when Orioles closer Jim Johnson overthrows.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 14, 2010
Maryland's highway chief says the speed cameras deployed in work zones around the state aren't generating enough fines to cover their operating costs. And he couldn't be more delighted. "It is worth our having to come up with additional money to cover the costs," State Highway Administrator Neil J. Pedersen said Wednesday at a news conference to promote safe driving in work zones. Since the camera program began last fall, Pedersen said, his employees and contractors have noticed a decrease in the number of vehicles going more than 10 mph over the speed limit in work zones.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,getting.there@baltsun.com | November 24, 2008
Montgomery County thought it had Coleen Hanna dead to rights. There she was, caught on camera Aug. 6 in Silver Spring, flagrantly violating the speed limit in her sporty BMW. The problem: Hanna, who lives in Edgewater and works in the Baltimore area, doesn't drive a BMW. She was certain she was nowhere near Montgomery County on that day. And the car in the photograph accompanying the speeding ticket looked nothing like her Ford Focus. Nevertheless, Hanna was charged with being the driver with tag No. GZS 764 who was speeding through the streets of Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Ray Frager and David Zurawik and Ray Frager and David Zurawik,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2005
Monday Night Football, for 35 years a network staple and a program that once made pop stars of Howard Cosell and "Dandy" Don Meredith, will leave broadcast television after the 2005 season and move to the cable network ESPN. Though Monday Night Football was still a Top 10 program, it had become a money drain for ABC and corporate parent Walt Disney Co. - losing a reported $150 million per year - so the program will move to another Disney property in ESPN. Neither ESPN nor the NFL gave dollar figures in yesterday's announcements, but the rights to Monday Night Football will cost $1.1 billion per year, according to sources cited by the Associated Press.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
Once again Monday night, TBS came through with superior coverage of Baltimore Orioles playoff baseball. You can read more on what I have said about the broadcast team of Ernie Johnson, Cal Ripken and John Smoltz here . Ripken seemed a little less engaged Monday night, but maybe the grind is getting to him. Kidding -- he's the Iron Man, and all three were again fine in Game 2. Smoltz was better than fine. He was razor sharp in his analysis, as when he explained what happens when Orioles closer Jim Johnson overthrows.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1995
The question before Channel 13's Dave Ricklin is this:Once you've reported on zit horror stories, dressed up like a member of "The Love Boat," and swiped a handful of jelly beans on the air, what do you do for an encore?To him, the answer seems obvious. With Valentine's Day near, you go to Loyola College, troll for tales of first kisses, and, when all else fails, engineer a peck on the cheek between two students who are complete strangers.This is Dave's World, and welcome to it.As WJZ-TV's new twentysomething reporter, he's bringing Jiffy Lube-style journalism to the 5 o'clock news, playing a smart-aleck and stand-up comedian during his Monday segments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 1, 2003
Alfred Stieglitz, the embattled genius who practically single-handedly dragged photography into the 20th century, was a tireless writer, publisher and gallery owner as well as a gifted photographer in his own right. Stieglitz wrote or edited hundreds of articles championing the artists he admired -- from photographers Edward Steichen and Paul Strand to painters Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse to sculptor Auguste Rodin. Much of his criticism appeared in Camera Work, the little magazine he established in 1903 to promote his avant-garde ideas and which he continued to publish until 1917.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 24, 2003
Every new art form has to have its champion, and in the case of photography none was more dedicated, wily or combative than Alfred Stieglitz, the American-born artist-impresario, gallery owner, editor and tireless advocate who almost single-handedly invented modern photography. From the perspective of today's booming photography market, it is difficult to imagine how embattled Stieglitz and his tiny circle of true believers felt at the turn of the 20th century, when their struggle to win recognition of photography as an art became a messianic cause waged with the take-no-prisoners ardor of a military campaign.
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