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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
It wasn't just any water main break that Fox 45 morning news reporter Rick Boone found in West Baltimore yesterday. No, it was a "frozen tundra. " "I've been a TV reporter for about 15 years, and I've never, ever seen the after effects of a water main break like I see here," said Boone. Then, on the edge of the tundra, a car appeared. "Slow down, slow down," Boone yelled to the driver. Then, to the camera operator, "Move out of the way!" The car drove smoothly over the ice without skidding.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
It wasn't just any water main break that Fox 45 morning news reporter Rick Boone found in West Baltimore yesterday. No, it was a "frozen tundra. " "I've been a TV reporter for about 15 years, and I've never, ever seen the after effects of a water main break like I see here," said Boone. Then, on the edge of the tundra, a car appeared. "Slow down, slow down," Boone yelled to the driver. Then, to the camera operator, "Move out of the way!" The car drove smoothly over the ice without skidding.
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NEWS
March 18, 2013
I found your recent article about speed cameras most disturbing ("Losses claimed on speed cameras," March 13). It brings to light why this program was a failure from the start. Not once is it mentioned that the main purposes of the cameras to protect public safety by curbing speeding and aggressive driving. Your story only mentions the cost of the equipment compared to the revenue it generates and how much the city and the camera operator make off the devices. Have we lost sight of the fact that these tools are to intended to increase safety on the roadways, not become a primary source or revenue?
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Baltimore officials are refusing to pay the city's former speed and red-light camera operator $2 million for its final three months of work, a period that preceded the troubled start for the new contractor in January. The city stopped issuing tickets from the cameras for weeks because of the rocky transition from the old vendor, Xerox State and Local Solutions, to Brekford Corp. Xerox says it's owed money for services provided in October, November and December, according to Solicitor George Nilson, the city's chief lawyer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 28, 2009
Gary Joseph Gemski, a WMAR technician who worked at the final game at Memorial Stadium and the first one at Camden Yards, died of cancer Dec. 20 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Ellicott City resident was 53. Born in Derby, Conn., he earned a degree in radio, television and film from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1978. There he met his future wife, Barbara Dougherty. "We both lived on the seventh floor of the Hagerstown dorm," she said. He joined the television station as a summer relief employee in spring 1979 and was later hired.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
Before the mayor even bangs his gavel, Manchester Town Council meetings kick off in a way that's all their own. "OK, Gerr?" Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario asks the camera operator. Taking her cue, Geraldine "Gerri" Berwager zooms in on a small black sign with white letters announcing the meeting day and date. She pulls back and focuses -- sometimes a little slowly -- on the mayor. She may have a videocassette recorder sitting unused and blinking at home, but this 77-year-old great-grandmother is somewhat handy with at least one piece of electronics: the camera used to televise the Manchester meetings.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
If there is a general theme that runs through The Sun's investigation of speed camera programs on the state and local level in the Baltimore area, it is this: Governments have found ways to follow the letter of the law that maximize the number of citations issued while flouting the spirit of the law that protects the public from erroneous tickets. The law is designed to prevent the camera operator from being paid on a per ticket basis, but Baltimore City, Baltimore County and, to an extent, Howard County found a way around that.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Baltimore officials are refusing to pay the city's former speed and red-light camera operator $2 million for its final three months of work, a period that preceded the troubled start for the new contractor in January. The city stopped issuing tickets from the cameras for weeks because of the rocky transition from the old vendor, Xerox State and Local Solutions, to Brekford Corp. Xerox says it's owed money for services provided in October, November and December, according to Solicitor George Nilson, the city's chief lawyer.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
After some delay, Baltimore County officials have begun operating two of 15 proposed speed cameras. One focuses on westbound lanes on the 7000 block of Dunman Way near Dundalk Middle School and Dundalk Elementary School, while the other is trained on eastbound lanes of the 1200 block of Sulphur Spring Road in Halethorpe, near Arbutus Middle School. The cameras were authorized on Sept. 8, when the Baltimore County Council approved legislation authorizing the use of speed cameras in up to 15 school zones.
NEWS
By Michael Scarcella and Michael Scarcella,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2001
Accidents and citations for running red lights have declined at intersections where automated cameras have been installed, according to data released yesterday by the Baltimore County Police Department. The statistics show citations dropped from 14,366 from January through May 2000 to 10,638 from January through May this year, a 26 percent decline, while accidents dropped from 122 in all of 1999 to 55 in 2000, a 55 percent decrease. Cameras have been operating at 20 intersections since 1999.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
I found your recent article about speed cameras most disturbing ("Losses claimed on speed cameras," March 13). It brings to light why this program was a failure from the start. Not once is it mentioned that the main purposes of the cameras to protect public safety by curbing speeding and aggressive driving. Your story only mentions the cost of the equipment compared to the revenue it generates and how much the city and the camera operator make off the devices. Have we lost sight of the fact that these tools are to intended to increase safety on the roadways, not become a primary source or revenue?
NEWS
December 10, 2012
If there is a general theme that runs through The Sun's investigation of speed camera programs on the state and local level in the Baltimore area, it is this: Governments have found ways to follow the letter of the law that maximize the number of citations issued while flouting the spirit of the law that protects the public from erroneous tickets. The law is designed to prevent the camera operator from being paid on a per ticket basis, but Baltimore City, Baltimore County and, to an extent, Howard County found a way around that.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
After some delay, Baltimore County officials are operating two of 15 proposed speed cameras. One focuses on westbound lanes on the 7000 block of Dunman Way near Dundalk Middle School and Dundalk Elementary School, while the other is trained on eastbound lanes of the 1200 block of Sulphur Spring Road in Halethorpe, near Arbutus Middle School. The cameras went into operation Monday. Baltimore County Council approved legislation Sept. 8 authorizing speed cameras in up to 15 school zones.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 28, 2009
Gary Joseph Gemski, a WMAR technician who worked at the final game at Memorial Stadium and the first one at Camden Yards, died of cancer Dec. 20 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Ellicott City resident was 53. Born in Derby, Conn., he earned a degree in radio, television and film from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1978. There he met his future wife, Barbara Dougherty. "We both lived on the seventh floor of the Hagerstown dorm," she said. He joined the television station as a summer relief employee in spring 1979 and was later hired.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
Before the mayor even bangs his gavel, Manchester Town Council meetings kick off in a way that's all their own. "OK, Gerr?" Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario asks the camera operator. Taking her cue, Geraldine "Gerri" Berwager zooms in on a small black sign with white letters announcing the meeting day and date. She pulls back and focuses -- sometimes a little slowly -- on the mayor. She may have a videocassette recorder sitting unused and blinking at home, but this 77-year-old great-grandmother is somewhat handy with at least one piece of electronics: the camera used to televise the Manchester meetings.
NEWS
By Michael Scarcella and Michael Scarcella,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2001
Accidents and citations for running red lights have declined at intersections where automated cameras have been installed, according to data released yesterday by the Baltimore County Police Department. The statistics show citations dropped from 14,366 from January through May 2000 to 10,638 from January through May this year, a 26 percent decline, while accidents dropped from 122 in all of 1999 to 55 in 2000, a 55 percent decrease. Cameras have been operating at 20 intersections since 1999.
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