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NEWS
November 26, 2012
When a police officer operates a radar unit to check speeding cars, he is usually trained and certified to operate a radar unit and to testify in court concerning the readings it obtained ("Not so fast," Nov. 20). Usually, the radar unit is calibrated at the beginning of each shift with a tuning fork. So how can a stationary radar speed camera operate 365 days a year in extreme heat and cold and still be accurate? This does not make any sense. I bet if the speed cameras were not producing great numbers of tickets, it would make your head spin to see how fast the technicians were out checking each unit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 8, 2014
Where are the cameras? We know bad cops exist. We know their actions have cost this city millions in court costs and degraded the police department's public image. Message received (" Call in the feds ," Oct. 6). Our leaders have abandoned the search for a solution that is already on the table: "CopCams. " The mayor and police chief are "reviewing" the idea, but what's to review? Many of us own smartphones with video. A quick trip to the Internet reveals helmet cameras and a full array of other video tools.
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NEWS
November 17, 2012
Baltimore Sun staff writers Scott Calvert and Luke Broadwater spent more than six months investigating the proliferation of speed cameras in the Baltimore region over the past three years. They obtained detailed citation data from Baltimore City, Baltimore County and the State Highway Administration, which oversees the state's highway work zones. The public records requests yielded data on more than 2 million government-issued citations, including the date, location, tag number and recorded speed for each.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
With as much electricity as there appeared to be at Camden Yards on Thursday night, it would be hard not to have a high-energy telecast. Give cable channel TBS credit for that: It did a solid job of communicating the color, excitement and sheer joy in the stands for the American League Division Series opener as the Orioles beat the Detroit Tigers, 12-3. It might seem like an obvious choice, but coming out of commercials time and again with hand-held cameras in the face of fans in full orange-and-black regalia as they clapped, cheered and waved signs was definitely the way to go. I loved the field-level shots looking up into the stands.
NEWS
By Pat van den Beemt | August 17, 2012
Another Baltimore County speed camera has been vandalized. County police received a phone call at 7:25 a.m. Aug. 17 to report that the newly installed camera on Cromwell Bridge Road near Loch Raven High School had been spray-painted, said police spokesperson Elise Armacost. The camera was not damaged. She said light red paint was used to spray expletives on the camera casing, and the lens was also painted. But the camera has been cleaned and is back in operation. "People need to remember that this is a crime," Armacost said.
EXPLORE
November 10, 2011
The 30-day warning period for Howard County's new speed cameras will end next week. As of 6 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 16, drivers caught going 12 mph or more over the speed limit will receive citations and be fined $40, according to the Howard County Police Department. The speed cameras are in vans and operate in school zones on weekdays between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. The county has two cameras now, but county law allows for up to eight. The police department's website is updated each Thursday with camera locations for the following week, though it does not give specific dates and times.
EXPLORE
September 24, 2013
What do you think the odds are that Ken Ulman and Courtney "Speed Camera" Watson will learn anything from the recent destruction of the new, semi-permanent speed camera that was recently destroyed in Glenelg? I doubt they will learn a thing. Perhaps if listening to the voters was something they ever thought of doing in the first place, this would not have happened. First, they manufactured evidence that the cameras were necessary, with their phony report that Watson so famously waved in the faces of those testifying against the one-eyed bandits in the hearing 1 1/2years ago. Then, after they loaded up the hearing room with county employees and used "heart-wrenching" testimony about an incident that occurred over 20 years ago to justify their position, they forced photo enforcement upon us. Just over a year later, we learn that the program barely brings in a fraction of the expected revenue.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 28, 2012
Two and a half years ago, I wrote a column about getting nailed by a speed camera in Baltimore for the first time, and, let me tell you, did the righteous readers of this newspaper - people who never ever ever drive over the speed limit - give me a load of grief. They accused me of being a danger to society and of using precious space to grind a personal ax in public. They believed in the machines. Around the 50th email, I had to stop reading what a loathsome guy I was on account of my delicate condition.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
Quick: Name the school closest to North Charles Street and Lake Avenue in North Baltimore. Stumped? The city's Department of Transportation has the answer: It's the Bryn Mawr School, less than a half-mile southwest of the intersection as the crow flies over the trees and side streets. The distance matters. Charles and Lake is the site of one of the city's 75 permanent speed cameras. Under state law, the devices must lie within a half-mile of a school, or 2,640 feet. With its hundreds of schools, Baltimore is essentially one giant potential school zone, as the accompanying map shows.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
The way Omar Broadway sees it, Maryland prisons are overrun with gangs, disciplinary rules are ignored and inmates pass the time playing video games and making wine in their cells. You don't have to take his word for it: He says he's getting it on film. Broadway, a New Jersey native serving a 12-year sentence for carjacking, has gained notoriety as an amateur documentarian of life behind bars. The choppy footage he captured in a Newark prison was turned into a full-length feature ("An Omar Broadway Film")
NEWS
September 27, 2014
Regarding your editorial "Cops and cameras" (Sept. 24), in the aftermath of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., many city councils and police departments across the country are considering or outfitting their officers with body cameras. Requiring officers to wear body cameras makes sense. It will make them think twice before resorting to more aggressive tactics in dealing with citizens during street stops and calls for service. And since some interactions between police and the public may lead to charges of officer misconduct, the video feed may help police department internal affairs investigators, judges and juries make more informed decisions regarding an appropriate disposition.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
Legislation introduced Monday in the City Council would require every Baltimore police officer to wear a body camera within a year. Though the proposal leaves many questions unanswered regarding how evidence from the devices could be used, who would have access to it and, not insignificantly, how the new equipment would be paid for, we think on balance that the benefits of the technology far outweigh the costs both in terms of improving police-community relations...
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Two City Councilmen plan to submit legislation today requiring every police officer in Baltimore to wear a body camera that records audio and video as the officers go about their jobs. Warren Branch, chairman of the council's public safety committee, and Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's proposal would permit the Baltimore Police Department to phase-in use of the body cameras during the first year after the bill, if approved, becomes law. The bill comes amid a series of high-profile allegations of police misconduct in Baltimore and around the country.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Two influential City Council members introduced legislation Monday that would require every Baltimore police officer to wear a body camera within a year - a move they argue would cut down on police brutality in the aftermath of several high-profile misconduct allegations. Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Councilman Warren Branch, chairman of the panel's public safety committee, cited questions surrounding the in-custody death last year of Tyrone West and a recent video showing an officer repeatedly punching a suspect, among other cases, as reasons for the proposed law. It would require all of Baltimore's nearly 3,000 sworn police officers to wear a device constantly recording the audio and video of their interactions with the public.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police will be able to keep an eye on their colleagues on patrol out on the Chesapeake Bay thanks to a new live video streaming system built with the help of a Baltimore County technology company. The system built by Tessco Technologies Inc., located in Hunt Valley, along with the DNR and RAD Data Communications, a New Jersey firm, is now running on 140 police boats that cover the bay's 64,000 square miles. DNR spokeswoman Candy Thomson said the system helps officers at the command center in Annapolis keep an eye on officers on patrol, who are often miles away from the nearest backup.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
City Councilman James B. Kraft says he's hired two investigators to help complete a City Council probe of Baltimore's troubled speed camera system.   Two paralegals - - who are paid $32 and $26 per hour, respectively - - from the Robert Half Legal staffing firm began work last week reviewing thousands of documents that the Rawlings-Blake administration turned over to Kraft's committee.   “The mayor has approved the money for two full-time investigators for up to three months,” Kraft said.
NEWS
By Bonnie J. Schupp | January 5, 2011
A little more than 31 years ago, when I learned I was pregnant, I was ecstatic. Then I began photographing every part of my daughter's journey. I started with a close-up of the positive pregnancy test, continued with pictures during prenatal visits to the doctor, took portraits of my evolving and growing belly — and finally, I took photos of her birth. Yes, I photographed the extraordinary event as I was giving birth to my daughter at Baltimore's Sinai Hospital. My first view (and photo)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Howard County police say their speed camera vendor has corrected a year's worth of inaccurate data the company submitted about the cameras there.  In a letter submitted to the County Council this week, Chief Gary Gardner reported that Xerox State & Local Solutions had resolved its data issues to the police department's satisfaction. "Xerox has resubmitted the report to the police department after manually checking the data points and it now includes all of the original, complete information," Gardner wrote.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
I agree with Christopher Winslow's letter decrying the attempt to reinstitute Baltimore City's speed cameras ( "Baltimore should not resurrect speed cameras," Aug. 26). They have never been about safety, only revenue. If nothing else, they offer perverse incentives to our esteemed politicians, who seem delighted to take money from citizens and visitors and send a good chunk of it to out-of-town vendors. I've not seen a shred of evidence that the cameras serve their intended purpose.
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