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By Paul Duke and Paul Duke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 1997
"The Dark Side of Camelot," by Seymour Hersh. Little Brown. 498 pages. $26.95.Hardly anybody has had a kind word to say about this book. No sooner had it rolled off the presses than the critics began gunning it down in a fusillade of angry denunciations.Seymour Hersh may be a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter, but the howlers claim he has recklessly gone off the deep end with his harsh portrait of John Kennedy and his licentious lifestyle: that the latest revelations are more fiction than fact, that the episodes of misconduct are no more than warmed-over mud, that this tell-all tale is mostly a collection of tasteless trash that exposes the dark and irresponsible side of Hersh more than the darker side of Camelot.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
William Voss Elder III, a retired Baltimore Museum of Art curator who helped first lady Jacqueline Kennedy during the 1960s bring antique furnishing to the White House, died of heart failure Thursday at Northwest Hospital. The Upperco resident was 82. In more than three decades at the Baltimore Museum of Art , he enlarged its collections of furniture, glass, porcelain, textiles and silver, and rescued architectural treasures by salvaging doomed interiors for reinstatement as period rooms.
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NEWS
By Jane M. Earhart | November 22, 1991
THE SHIP docked mid-morning Friday, Nov. 22. Friends and I were returning to New York City from a cruise in the Bahamas and planned to complete the vacation with a weekend of fun and frolic in the Big Apple.Immediately after our hotel check-in, we were off to "do the shops" on Fifth Avenue. First stop was Saks. I bought a blue and white silk scarf, which today I can't wear without the memories of that day flooding back.Going up in the elevator at Saks, we overheard two ladies discussing "yet another tragedy in that family."
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 23, 2013
My parents voted for Richard Nixon in the 1960 presidential election. I had not yet developed a political worldview, but as a freshman at American University in Washington, D.C., I stayed up late to watch the election returns slowly trickle in before going to bed at 2 a.m. with the outcome still undecided. The following year I was hired as a copyboy at NBC News, delivering wire service "copy" to news reporters in the network's Washington bureau. White House correspondent Sander Vanocur invited me to accompany him to observe the swearing-in of Adlai Stevenson as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 2001
Pasadena Theatre Company's production of Lerner and Loewe's "Camelot" opens tomorrow night at Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts in Brooklyn Park - the first show in the main theater of the new arts center to have an extended run. "Camelot" boasts a cast of 45 and a 14-piece live orchestra in the pit, for its four-weekend stand. The 23-year-old Pasadena Theatre Company has staged shows over the past five years at Baldwin Hall, Woods Community Center and Humanities Hall at Anne Arundel Community College.
FEATURES
By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 15, 1998
It's called "Quest for Camelot," but it's more like "Camelittle."Oh, Merlin and King Arthur make brief appearances, but there's no Mordred, no Morgan le Fay, no Guinevere. Instead, there's Kayley, a generically Disneyesque heroine who comes of age by helping a blind stud named Garrett track down the sword that's been plucked from the stone it's supposed to be in.Naturally, there's a bad guy -- Gary Oldman supplying the voice of Ruber, a vain brute.There are some pretty backdrops and a few of the jokes will crack up adults.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | November 26, 2002
THE CURTAIN finally may be dropping on Camelot after a 42-year run. In this election cycle alone, four Kennedy progeny, either by bloodline or extension, were ejected from elective politics by defeat or withdrawal. And another two were forced to the sidelines, done in by their own misadventures. Only Edward F. Kennedy, celebrating his silver jubilee as a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts, and his son Patrick, who survived to win a fifth term as a Rhode Island congressman after an embarrassing series of frat-boy botches and blunders, still wear the epaulets of elective office.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | March 27, 2008
In the nearly half-century since Camelot was first performed, our national self-image has altered. We no longer are as confident as we were in 1960, that we always use might to serve right. Perhaps that explains some of my disappointment in the production of Lerner and Loewe's musical running at the Hippodrome Theatre. But there are other reasons for discontent. If you go Camelot runs at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St., 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturdays; and 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Sundays through April 6. $25-$70.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | May 30, 1994
An honorable knight who remains on the scene long enough may eventually become the king. That's the royal lesson Robert Goulet has learned owing to his lengthy association with the musical "Camelot."In the original 1960 production of this Lerner and Loewe show, Mr. Goulet played Sir Lancelot to Richard Burton's King Arthur and Julie Andrews' Guinevere. The role made him a star.In the touring version of "Camelot," opening Tuesday at the Lyric Opera House, he'll wear King Arthur's crown as he gives orders to the Knights of the Round Table.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 2, 1994
A place where the seasons and weather are forever fixed and unchangeable would probably be pretty dull, but that's the way things are in Lerner and Loewe's "Camelot." It also describes the placid feel of the touring production starring Robert Goulet at the Lyric Opera House.King Arthur's wise teacher, Merlyn, was said to be able to "remember the future," so he probably could have predicted that Goulet, who made his Broadway debut in the role of Lancelot in 1960, would return to the now-classic musical more than three decades later as older-but-wiser King Arthur.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 20, 2013
The assassination of President John F. Kennedy came up one day several years ago, in a jarring way, and at a moment when I least expected it. I was fishing with Bill Burton and Calvert Bregel, two of my older, wiser friends. We were knee-deep in the Gunpowder River, in northern Baltimore County. "You know what?" Calvert said, looking downstream and squinting, as if to dislodge a memory. "I haven't been here in a long time, but I think there used to be a nice covered bridge over this river.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
When Lerner and Loewe's "Camelot" debuted on Broadway in 1960 with a cast headed by Richard Burton as King Arthur, Julie Andrews as Guinevere and Robert Goulet, an unknown Canadian in his first starring role, as Lancelot, the musical became an instant hit. Fifty-three years later, "Camelot" retains its luster, especially in 2nd Star's current production, now playing at Bowie Playhouse in White Marsh Park. Frederick Loewe's music and Alan Jay Lerner's lyrics are magic. Lerner is also responsible for the book, allowing King Arthur's message of hope and idealism to permeate almost every scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Since "Nixon in China," the 1987 masterwork by John Adams that launched what some wag described as a new genre labeled "CNN Opera," contemporary events have been fairer game than ever for composers and librettists. The list of newsy operas, which includes Adams' "The Death of Klinghoffer" and Stewart Wallace's "Harvey Milk," got a little longer with the premiere last weekend of "Camelot Requiem" as part of the Spire Series at First & Franklin Presbyterian Church. This intriguing and largely persuasive piece about the day of the Kennedy assassination, with text by Caitlin Vincent and music by Joshua Bornfield, received an admirable production from The Figaro Project, a plucky ensemble Vincent founded a few years ago. Treating iconic figures is a tricky business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
Fifty years later, the assassination of John F. Kennedy remains a galvanizing event, studied by serious scholars and conspiracy fringers with equal intensity. People who were old enough in 1963 still remember everything about the news flash that something horrible had happened in Dallas to the nation's youthful president. Those born much later may also find themselves haunted by this dark history. They may even create an opera about it. "Camelot Requiem," which receives its world premiere this weekend with Baltimore area singers and instrumentalists, is the latest and perhaps most ambitious undertaking to date of the Figaro Project, a DIY organization founded by soprano Caitlin Vincent in 2009.
EXPLORE
January 22, 2013
Editor: Harford County once had connections to the Kennedy Camelot. The Shrivers of Olney Farms, at Wilmer, were relatives of President Kennedy. President Kennedy also had friends at the Oakington Estate in Havre de Grace. Each of us can live in our own Camelot, not the magic Camelot with the round table and beautiful women and knights with swords and horses, but we can live in our Camelot of today. Electronic gimmicks and gadgets dominate our world today. Everyone, from the wise to the not so wise, is able to express their opinion about any and all events, and yet we are isolated from each other.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 3, 2010
Before there was Kate and Leo. Before Brad and Angelina. And long before Kristen and Robert, there was Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero. The lush musical film "Camelot," starring Redgrave and Nero, came to theaters my sophomore year in high school, when I was as vulnerable to romance as I ever would be. As if the doomed love affair between Guinevere and Lancelot were not enough to wring the heart of a schoolgirl, there was the rumor —...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 22, 2003
What with the continuing onslaught of The Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter, you might think all things medieval (in the case of the first) and all things magic (in the case of both) were becoming a bit much. You might even think a revival of Camelot would be a case of bandwagon-jumping, or worse, overkill. Well, think again. Magic and all things medieval are just a small part of what's right about director Molly Smith's moving, resonant, regal production at Washington's Arena Stage.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 17, 1998
Robert White lives in Catonsville but keeps his financial prospects, and maybe his heart, in Camelot. Many of us moved out of the neighborhood years ago, but White believes there are things that keep tugging us back: a vision of our youth, a remembrance of half-vanished ideals, or a shot at a really good deal on an ashtray in which John F. Kennedy once dumped an acrid cigar.White has spent the past 35 years collecting mementos of the martyred Kennedy, who had the good sense to be president before the age of Monica Lewinsky, Paula Corbin Jones or Kathleen Willey.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | December 18, 2008
Run, Caroline, run! At a time of gloom and economic doom, we could use a little glamour. Depression-era Americans had Shirley Temple on the movie screen; recessionistas of today deserve a Senator Caroline Kennedy on Capitol Hill. You've caught, no doubt, some of the breathless drama playing out in New York as various figures jockey to fill the Senate seat that will be vacated by Hillary Clinton when she becomes secretary of state. After a little, who-me bit of coyness, JFK's daughter now is openly coveting and actively campaigning to succeed Clinton, and just like that, she is the immediate front-runner to get it. Places, everyone, and action!
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | March 27, 2008
In the nearly half-century since Camelot was first performed, our national self-image has altered. We no longer are as confident as we were in 1960, that we always use might to serve right. Perhaps that explains some of my disappointment in the production of Lerner and Loewe's musical running at the Hippodrome Theatre. But there are other reasons for discontent. If you go Camelot runs at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St., 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturdays; and 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Sundays through April 6. $25-$70.
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