Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCambridge
IN THE NEWS

Cambridge

TRAVEL
August 8, 2010
'Crab Week' savings at Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay What's the deal? The Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay is offering discount rates for its first-ever Crab Week, Aug. 23-29. The resort in Cambridge will feature such activities as crab races, crab walks, crab-cooking demonstrations and a crab-cake eating contest. A "Crabbing 101" workshop will offer a plant tour and family-style crab feast at nearby crab-picking house J.M. Clayton Co. on Aug. 28. Rates start at $159, Sunday to Thursday, and $199 on Friday and Saturday.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
"Learn to ride a horse — not merely hold on. "Learn to shoot. Aim high and never give up. "Service. "Love."
TRAVEL
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,Tribune Newspapers | October 25, 2009
Hanging around in Cambridge, Mass., has its drawbacks. You may, for instance, feel undereducated, maybe even IQ-impaired. But spend the time anyway. This country's first college town is full of far more American history, smart shops, cool museums, inviting restaurants and all-around entertainment than your average city of 95,000. Harvard University sprawls on about 380 acres at one edge of Cambridge. Massachusetts Institute of Technology sits on 168 acres at another edge. The Charles River bends around both campuses, and the tree-lined streets should be exploding about now with red and gold leaves.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | July 28, 2009
The spat between Harvard professor Henry Louis "Skip" Gates Jr. and Cambridge police officer James Crowley quickly escalated into the latest national conversation on race in America. But the more I read about and reflect upon what happened, the conflict seems less the result of an asymmetry in the melanin levels of the two men than of unusually high levels - on that day, on that porch - of testosterone. Let's start with Professor Gates. Based on his own statements in the days following the incident, we learned that he had just returned, after a one-day stopover in New York, from a trip to China.
NEWS
July 26, 2009
Do you think the police in Cambridge, Mass., acted wrongly in the incident that resulted in the arrest of Harvard University scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr.? Yes 78% No 19% Not sure 3% (4,199 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Do you think that recent positive signs for the economy mean that the recession is almost over? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | July 26, 2009
The recent arrest of Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr., the African-American scholar and author, has become a frenzy of accusations, recrimination and good old political spin. Just as the fire was dying down - and it seemed Gates could get back to writing more books such as Colored People: A Memoir and In Search of Our Roots - President Barack Obama's comment about Cambridge, Mass., police acting "stupidly" stoked it again. As a former Boston resident, I'm well aware of the area's history of racial tension.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 23, 2009
John V. Lewis Jr., the former longtime proprietor of a landmark general store in Cambridge that sold everything from steaks to screwdrivers, died May 15 at Dorchester General Hospital of complications from heart disease. The Cambridge resident was 80. Mr. Lewis, the son of grocers, was born in Cambridge and raised in the city's Neck District neighborhood. In 1946, his father established the Lewis Drive Inn, and a year later, the Lewis Store on Route 343. Mr. Lewis was a graduate of Cambridge High School and served in the Army as a military policeman from 1950 to 1953.
TRAVEL
By Sophie Terbush and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 7, 2009
Go here: Set against the picturesque backdrop of the Choptank River waterfront, Cambridge is a still-quiet vacation spot poised for discovery as restored 19th-century buildings become home to contemporary boutiques and art galleries, and streets are outfitted with new plantings and period lighting to accentuate the old-fashioned charm of the historic district. A walk downtown will reveal restaurants, antique shops, thrift shops, maritime museums, spas and more. For a more official walking tour, take one of historic High Street, guided by a docent in Colonial costume who will reveal the fascinating history of downtown Cambridge (West End Citizens' Association, 410-901-1000)
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
I had never seen Bea Arthur on the stage until 1966, when I was sitting in the audience at the Winter Garden Theatre in New York City listening to the orchestra warm up and waiting for the curtain to rise on the Broadway musical Mame, which had opened that May to rave reviews. Arthur was playing boozy actress and sidekick Vera Charles to Angela Lansbury's Mame, and no one has ever played that role better. First off, what added luster to the character of Vera Charles was Arthur's interpretation, much enlivened by a distinctively husky voice that sounded like a cross between a basso profundo steam whistle off the liner Q ueen Mary and a Nantucket foghorn.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | March 23, 2009
George M. Radcliffe Sr., a retired lawyer and Eastern Shore environmentalist, died March 13 of viral meningitis and pneumonia at Memorial Hospital in Easton. He was 89. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Radcliffe was the son of U.S. Sen. George L. Radcliffe, a Maryland Democrat, and Mary McKim Marriott Radcliffe. Mr. Radcliffe was raised on Edgevale Road in Roland Park and graduated from Gilman School in 1939. He earned a bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering in 1943 from Princeton University.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.