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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2002
P. William Filby, former director of the Maryland Historical Society and an authority on "The Star-Spangled Banner," died of a stroke Nov. 2 at Laurel Regional Hospital. He was 90 and lived in Savage. Mr. Filby was born and raised in Cambridge, England. After attending the Cambridge and County High School, he joined the Cambridge University Library, working in its rare-book division. After volunteering for the British army in 1940, he later transferred to the British Intelligence Corps as a member of the cryptographic team at Bletchley, England, where Germany's ULTRA code was broken.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 25, 2010
Owen Martin Phillips, a retired Johns Hopkins University oceanographer and former chair of its Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, died of gastric cancer Oct. 13 at his Chestertown home. He was 79 and lived for many years in Roland Park. Dr. Phillips developed a methodology for predicting and describing the shape of ocean waves, including giant waves, which are 100-foot-high upheavals of the sea surface. Hopkins colleagues said his research became crucial in the design of ships and oil drilling platforms, which need to withstand these outsized swells.
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NEWS
June 22, 1993
James Benton Parsons, 81, who became the first black federal judge in the nation when President Kennedy appointed him in 1961, died Saturday in Chicago after a long illness. He retired from trial work last year but had remained active, performing such duties as swearing in new citizens, until illness made that impossible. "He was a very close friend of mine who certainly paid his dues," said Syd Finley, executive secretary of the Chicago chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
BUSINESS
By Grace Snodgrass and Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
Cambridge is easy to miss. The city sits off U.S. 50 along the banks of the Choptank River and often goes unnoticed by motorists on their way to Ocean City. But many residents here hope that changes soon. Since the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay resort opened here last year, tourism has become the city's top draw. And developers are proposing thousands of new homes for the open space and waterfront land in the area. "I get into conversations with other people in the planning and zoning business and the buzz is all Cambridge," says Sharon Johnston, a Realtor with Long & Foster Cos. In an area that never has drawn much attention to itself, city leaders believe that buzz may be just what is needed to shake off a decades-long economic slump and bring new energy to the region.
NEWS
By A. O. Pittenger | June 17, 1991
THE MAN WHO KNEW INFINITY: A Life of the Genius Ramanujan. By Robert Kanigel. Macmillan. 438 pages. $27.95. ONE OF the quickest ways to kill a conversation is to say that one is a mathematician; and one of the surest ways to produce glazed expressions is to actually discuss mathematics.Thus Baltimorean Robert Kanigel has set himself a formidable challenge, since he writes about a mathematician and necessarily discusses his mathematics.In January 1913, G.H. Hardy, a prominent English mathematician, received a letter from Scrinivasa Ramanujan, an obscure 23-year-old clerk living in Madras, India.
BUSINESS
By Grace Snodgrass and Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
Cambridge is easy to miss. The city sits off U.S. 50 along the banks of the Choptank River and often goes unnoticed by motorists on their way to Ocean City. But many residents here hope that changes soon. Since the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay resort opened here last year, tourism has become the city's top draw. And developers are proposing thousands of new homes for the open space and waterfront land in the area. "I get into conversations with other people in the planning and zoning business and the buzz is all Cambridge," says Sharon Johnston, a Realtor with Long & Foster Cos. In an area that never has drawn much attention to itself, city leaders believe that buzz may be just what is needed to shake off a decades-long economic slump and bring new energy to the region.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 25, 2010
Owen Martin Phillips, a retired Johns Hopkins University oceanographer and former chair of its Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, died of gastric cancer Oct. 13 at his Chestertown home. He was 79 and lived for many years in Roland Park. Dr. Phillips developed a methodology for predicting and describing the shape of ocean waves, including giant waves, which are 100-foot-high upheavals of the sea surface. Hopkins colleagues said his research became crucial in the design of ships and oil drilling platforms, which need to withstand these outsized swells.
TOPIC
By Christopher Isenberg | April 18, 1999
IT IS NOON on the Sunday before the annual Varsity match against Cambridge, and the Oxford University boxing team has just finished a grueling two-hour session of sparring, shadowboxing, bag work and circuit training.Still dripping sweat, they gather around an upright, gray-haired man known as the Colonel. A veteran of the Second World War, Lt. Colonel Peter Fleming boxed for Oxford in the late 1940s, and each year he delivers a series of talks on strategy to the team as they prepare for the big match.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and By Joseph R.L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | June 9, 2002
Not the Civil War but its Reconstruction aftermath rumbles on as the bloodiest battleground for American historians. In sheer numbers, there is nothing to compare with the continuing avalanche of war buff books on every brigade, every skirmish, every general in the North-South conflict. But these remain details about outcomes already known. What makes Reconstruction history so contentious, ideological and ever changing is its relevance, year after year, to the ferment of race relations in American society.
NEWS
March 27, 1995
Joseph Needham,94, a prolific British biochemist and scientific historian who spent decades researching, writing and editing a monumental history of scientific development in China, died Friday in London. He was associated with Gonville and Caius College at Cambridge University for 70 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2002
P. William Filby, former director of the Maryland Historical Society and an authority on "The Star-Spangled Banner," died of a stroke Nov. 2 at Laurel Regional Hospital. He was 90 and lived in Savage. Mr. Filby was born and raised in Cambridge, England. After attending the Cambridge and County High School, he joined the Cambridge University Library, working in its rare-book division. After volunteering for the British army in 1940, he later transferred to the British Intelligence Corps as a member of the cryptographic team at Bletchley, England, where Germany's ULTRA code was broken.
TOPIC
By Christopher Isenberg | April 18, 1999
IT IS NOON on the Sunday before the annual Varsity match against Cambridge, and the Oxford University boxing team has just finished a grueling two-hour session of sparring, shadowboxing, bag work and circuit training.Still dripping sweat, they gather around an upright, gray-haired man known as the Colonel. A veteran of the Second World War, Lt. Colonel Peter Fleming boxed for Oxford in the late 1940s, and each year he delivers a series of talks on strategy to the team as they prepare for the big match.
NEWS
June 22, 1993
James Benton Parsons, 81, who became the first black federal judge in the nation when President Kennedy appointed him in 1961, died Saturday in Chicago after a long illness. He retired from trial work last year but had remained active, performing such duties as swearing in new citizens, until illness made that impossible. "He was a very close friend of mine who certainly paid his dues," said Syd Finley, executive secretary of the Chicago chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
By A. O. Pittenger | June 17, 1991
THE MAN WHO KNEW INFINITY: A Life of the Genius Ramanujan. By Robert Kanigel. Macmillan. 438 pages. $27.95. ONE OF the quickest ways to kill a conversation is to say that one is a mathematician; and one of the surest ways to produce glazed expressions is to actually discuss mathematics.Thus Baltimorean Robert Kanigel has set himself a formidable challenge, since he writes about a mathematician and necessarily discusses his mathematics.In January 1913, G.H. Hardy, a prominent English mathematician, received a letter from Scrinivasa Ramanujan, an obscure 23-year-old clerk living in Madras, India.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 18, 1994
MMABATHO, South Africa -- The International School of South Africa sits in glorious incongruity in a place that used to be called Bophuthatswana.Amid the dusty, dry flatlands of the northwest part of South Africa, not far from some of the country's most brutal rural poverty, the school's elaborate, brick campus sprawls across bright green lawns.They provide the perfect spot for a team of white-flanneled cricketers to practice the art of protecting their wicket.The question is if this school is a vestige of a corrupt, discredited system or a beacon of light that can shine the way into the new South Africa?
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