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By New York Times News Service | September 10, 1990
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- After two years of difficult negotiations, the four Cambodian factions agreed yesterday on a United Nations framework for a comprehensive peace settlement, the Indonesian foreign minister said here last night."
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By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Vaddey Ratner didn't expect much when she first took on the project of writing a novel about a young Cambodian girl and her family who are forced into the countryside by the Khmer Rouge as part of the communist group's program of genocide that began in 1975. It was just something that she needed to do. "I sat down to write as an act of mourning the ghosts and spirits, honoring those lost lives," she explains. "In the Shadow of the Banyan," Ratner's first novel, is based on her experiences as a child.
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NEWS
By Douglass Crouse and Douglass Crouse,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 3, 2002
HACKENSACK, N.J. - The international controversy that has embroiled Michael and Susan Leon O'Connor started small. It started with Rath Kuntheang, who is only 13 months old. The first part of the child's name means "orphan" in Cambodia's Khmer language - and documents in the O'Connors' possession indicate that's what he is. Yet before the River Vale, N.J., couple can adopt their little boy and give him a home, they first must contend with the United...
NEWS
March 31, 2008
DITH PRAN, 75 `Killing Fields' survivor, news photographer Dith Pran, the Cambodian-born journalist whose harrowing tale of enslavement and eventual escape from that country's murderous Khmer Rouge in 1979 became the subject of the award-winning film The Killing Fields, died of pancreatic cancer yesterday at a New Jersey hospital, according to Sydney Schanberg, his former colleague at The New York Times. Dith's cancer had been diagnosed about three months ago. Dith was working as an interpreter and assistant for Schanberg in Phnom Penh, the Cambodian capital, when the Vietnam War reached its chaotic end in April 1975 and both countries were taken over by communist forces.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 30, 1997
Cambodian sculpture seems to have sprung fully developed into the world, like Athena from the forehead of Zeus, and its vitality continued for a thousand years. It was rooted in Hinduism and Buddhism, and people unfamiliar with those faiths inevitably will fail to fully comprehend its religious nature. Even so, to see these works is to recognize them as one of the supreme artistic achievements of mankind.The exhibit, "Sculpture of Angkor and Ancient Cambodia" at Washington's National Gallery of Art, opened yesterday, bringing together 100 works, almost all from the world's two premier collections: the National Museum of Cambodia in Phnom Penh and the Musee Guimet in Paris.
TOPIC
By TUN CHANNARETH | January 30, 2000
YOU experience a fear you will never forget when you are aware that the ground on which you walk is mined. In 1981, at tlle height of the Cambodian civil war, I felt that fear the day I lost my legs to an antipersonnel land mine. In one instant, I was no longer simply a soldier, an expectant father, or a husband. I became a land mine survivor. I wanted to die. There, in the jungle, I wanted my friend to kill me. With an ax, I cut the dead weight of one of my shattered legs from my torso so I was light enough to be lifted.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 1990
PARIS -- Cambodia's four warring factions approved yesterday most of the proposals of a detailed United Nations peace plan, including provisions for a cease-fire and free elections.But at the end of a two-day meeting here, overall approval of the plan was snagged by a dispute over proposals to demobilize and disarm the Cambodian national army and the three guerrilla groups seeking to topple the government in Phnom Penh.Diplomats at the talks said that the government of Premier Hun Sen feared that the U.N. plan to demobilize the warring factions could leave the Khmer Rouge with the upper hand because its forces might ignore efforts to disarm.
NEWS
January 25, 2006
At a former military complex outside the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh last week, military authorities handed over a group of new buildings to a United Nations-Cambodian organization. The buildings will serve as a center for investigating and ultimately trying some of the surviving former leaders of the genocidal Khmer Rouge - 27 years after that radical Communist party fell from power. This process of justice, which is finally supposed to begin next month and may take three years, has been in the making for a decade, and there is no certainty that it will proceed as planned.
NEWS
November 21, 1991
What strange bedfellows the peace process in Cambodia makes. Norodom Sihanouk, the once and future king or president, returned to a palace restored for him, and announced that he should be a figurehead and that three top leaders of the Khmer Rouge, who murdered his children and grandchildren in the 1970s, should be tried for mass murder.He omitted specificity on whether this should apply to the two Khmer Rouge members of the Supreme National Council, which he heads, the transitional regime that is making the peace.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | July 15, 1991
BEIJING -- After 12 years in lavish exile here, Cambodian Prince Norodom Sihanouk may at last be able to savor the realization of his most fervent wish: to die on the soil of his strife-torn homeland.The chameleonic, 68-year-old prince even may be able to achieve another personal milestone by celebrating in Cambodia next year the 40th anniversary of his marriage to the last of his six wives, French-Cambodian Princess Monique.More important, peace may finally be possible for 8 million Cambodians who have suffered through more than a decade of devastating civil war and, before that, 3 1/2 years of genocidal rule under the Communist Khmer Rouge.
FEATURES
By ANNE FARROW and ANNE FARROW,HARTFORD COURANT | April 25, 2006
During her childhood in Atlantic Highlands, N.J., Patricia Klindienst would go from yard to yard with her friends, eating fruit from the trees. The idea of neighborhood and community came to mean, for her, the sharing of food. For her first published book, Klindienst returned to the garden. Her doctorate from Stanford is in modern thought and literature, and she taught in the English and humanities departments at Yale, but Klindienst spent three years studying the cultural and historic traditions embedded in gardens for her new book, The Earth Knows My Name (Beacon Press, $26.95)
NEWS
January 25, 2006
At a former military complex outside the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh last week, military authorities handed over a group of new buildings to a United Nations-Cambodian organization. The buildings will serve as a center for investigating and ultimately trying some of the surviving former leaders of the genocidal Khmer Rouge - 27 years after that radical Communist party fell from power. This process of justice, which is finally supposed to begin next month and may take three years, has been in the making for a decade, and there is no certainty that it will proceed as planned.
NEWS
January 1, 2006
Dance Cambodian Stories The work of the Japanese-born dance duo Eiko and Koma has been described as "enacting mysterious rituals, set in desolate dreamscapes." The couple, who met while studying the ancient Japanese movement art called butoh, seem to create works about time, or silence, or nature, or the struggle to survive. Often their dances are so gradual that the performers seem to be not moving at all. Many works are performed in the nude. While their work may not be to everyone's taste, it has been acclaimed by reviewers and audiences across the United States and Europe.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 11, 2003
PING, Cambodia - The skeletons of two chickens dangle ominously above the forest path that leads into Ping, warning of disease and death. Inside the tiny village, straw effigies holding wood replicas of swords, rifles and even a rocket launcher guard flimsy huts against angry spirits. Since early March, the 392 people of Ping and its mountain neighbor, Bornhok, have been locked in mortal struggle against a nameless disease that has sickened more than 30 of them and killed seven in an agony of coughing, choking and delirium.
NEWS
By Douglass Crouse and Douglass Crouse,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 3, 2002
HACKENSACK, N.J. - The international controversy that has embroiled Michael and Susan Leon O'Connor started small. It started with Rath Kuntheang, who is only 13 months old. The first part of the child's name means "orphan" in Cambodia's Khmer language - and documents in the O'Connors' possession indicate that's what he is. Yet before the River Vale, N.J., couple can adopt their little boy and give him a home, they first must contend with the United...
TOPIC
By TUN CHANNARETH | January 30, 2000
YOU experience a fear you will never forget when you are aware that the ground on which you walk is mined. In 1981, at tlle height of the Cambodian civil war, I felt that fear the day I lost my legs to an antipersonnel land mine. In one instant, I was no longer simply a soldier, an expectant father, or a husband. I became a land mine survivor. I wanted to die. There, in the jungle, I wanted my friend to kill me. With an ax, I cut the dead weight of one of my shattered legs from my torso so I was light enough to be lifted.
NEWS
By Philip Shenon and Philip Shenon,New York Times News Service | December 1, 1991
ARANYAPRATHET, Thailand -- As hundreds of thousands of Cambodian refugees in Thailand hail a peace settlement in their country and prepare to return home, many express the fear that they may be maimed or even die from land mines that were laid across the Cambodian countryside during the last 12 years of civil war.No one has a reliable figure on the number of mines laid during the war by guerrilla factions and by troops of the Vietnamese-backed Cambodian government...
NEWS
March 31, 2008
DITH PRAN, 75 `Killing Fields' survivor, news photographer Dith Pran, the Cambodian-born journalist whose harrowing tale of enslavement and eventual escape from that country's murderous Khmer Rouge in 1979 became the subject of the award-winning film The Killing Fields, died of pancreatic cancer yesterday at a New Jersey hospital, according to Sydney Schanberg, his former colleague at The New York Times. Dith's cancer had been diagnosed about three months ago. Dith was working as an interpreter and assistant for Schanberg in Phnom Penh, the Cambodian capital, when the Vietnam War reached its chaotic end in April 1975 and both countries were taken over by communist forces.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 28, 1999
SIEM REAP, Cambodia -- In a country where mismanagement and graft are common, the Cambodian Mine Action Center long stood as a notable exception, its reputation unsullied, its effectiveness unquestioned.CMAC, as it is called, is entrusted with one of the most crucial jobs in Cambodia: clearing mines and unexploded ordnance from a country racked by three decades of warfare involving the United States, Vietnam and Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge army.Together with other agencies, CMAC has made great progress.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | July 27, 1997
SHE IS A GIRL of about 12, and she faces the camera with the calm composure of an innocent. Behind her is a blank wall or perhaps a sheet tacked up as a makeshift backdrop. Nothing in the picture suggests that the child is an enemy of the state, or that she will shortly be executed for her crimes.Last week I found myself returning over and over to this haunting image, one of several thousand prison mug shots taken by unknown government photographers during the Khmer Rouge's brutal four-year reign in Cambodia.
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