Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCambodia
IN THE NEWS

Cambodia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 3, 1993
The United Nations has declared victory in Cambodia and the last of its 22,000 troops will be out in November. The $2.6 billion peace-keeping operation, the costliest ever, looks well spent. Most of the refugees in Thailand have come home. A fair election was held. The new regime is up and running. President Clinton recognized it.King Norodom Sihanouk, first crowned in 1941, abdicated in 1955, prime minister until overthrown in 1970, is king again. This time, he is supposedly a constitutional figurehead of limited powers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John F. Gossart Jr and By John F. Gossart Jr | March 12, 2014
It remains to be seen whether the United States Congress can muster the responsibility and will to do what is right and achieve comprehensive immigration reform this year. Republican leadership in the House of Representatives continues to hold immigration reform hostage, most recently justifying inaction by blaming President Obama's alleged track record on failing to enforce our immigration laws. Perhaps those in Congress should come and sit inside the many immigration courtrooms throughout the country for a fact check on this unfounded assertion.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jim Fain | September 17, 1990
THINGS ARE never what they seem in Cambodia, but there's a gambler's chance that tortured land is about to enjoy its first taste of peace in a generation.If so, the end of the Cold War is mainly responsible. Some credit goes, however, to the Bush State Department. In the last few months, it has operated with totally unexpected skill in that Byzantine corner of Southeast Asia.Cambodia's agonies always have been inflicted from the outside. We invaded and bombed the daylights out of it during the Vietnam War. China backed the radical Khmer Rouge that ousted our puppet Lon Nol government there.
NEWS
By Ashley Surdin and Ashley Surdin,The Washington Post | September 1, 2009
LOS ANGELES - -Three Americans accused of traveling to Cambodia to have sex with children are expected to be charged in federal court here, officials said Monday, marking the first prosecutions under a new international initiative intended to combat child sex tourism. The initiative, Operation Twisted Traveler, targets Americans who exploit children for sex in Cambodia, which experts describe as a top destination for child predators. U.S. and Cambodian authorities, as well as nongovernmental organizations, were involved in the effort.
NEWS
By IAN JOHNSON and IAN JOHNSON,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 1995
SIEM REAP, Cambodia -- After a quarter century delay, the Terrace of the Leper King has finally been restored. Land mines no longer hinder a close-up look at the beatific faces of the Bayon Temple. Looters have been chased away from the temples and palaces that, a thousand years after being built, still define Cambodia's soul.For more than 20 years after the war in Indochina and the rampage of the Khmer Rouge that followed in Cambodia, Angkor Wat was practically unseen. Now Americans and other foreigners are returning to the splendid temples of gods and monuments to human kings.
NEWS
September 18, 1995
The Cambodian reconstruction flowing from the election of 1993 is incomplete. It cannot yet be hailed as victory or dismissed as failure.The Khmer Rouge, who killed a million Cambodians in the 1970s, are still in the field terrorizing and destroying. Cambodians are not secure and reconciliation has not occurred.Human rights organizations are rightly disappointed in the government of the royalist Prince Norodom Ranariddh and of the titular head of state Prince Norodom Sihanouk. Co-prime Minister Ranariddh is in unlikely coalition with the former Vietnam-influenced Communists led by Hun Sen.They are stifling opposition and cracking down on dissent.
NEWS
June 6, 1993
The Cambodian election was a victory for the United Nations and the peace accord of 1991, and a triumph of the human spirit. The U.N. supervised the country's administration and elections. This tortured, battered, decimated people turned out despite the threats of the Khmer Rouge in numbers that would put Americans to shame. Nine out of ten eligible Cambodians voted.That was a repudiation of the Khmer Rouge, which fearing loss had not taken part. It was also a defeat for the former Communist and Vietnam-influenced Cambodian People's Party of Prime Minister Hun Sen, which had violently harassed the royalist opposition, which won the most support.
NEWS
April 14, 1991
The administration's suspension of $7 million in aid to non-Communist rebels in Cambodia sends the right message, at least to Congress. The administration is carefully studying whether the U.S.- aided forces cooperated militarily with the Khmer Rouge, which the U.S. is sworn not to help. In fact, they have no military significance except alongside the stronger Khmer Rouge. The administration is slowly discovering what its critics know.Message aside, however, the loss of even this minor aid is harmful to Cambodian people, whose crops and roads and schools have been destroyed by U.S.-aided insurrection and who might have benefited from this aid, small as it is. The U.S. should be helping the people, including those in camps operated by the movements of Prince Sihanouk and Son Sann.
NEWS
By SUSAN A. JANOSKI | May 30, 1993
Phnom Penh, Cambodia. -- Imagine a three-story yellow stucco schoolhouse with tiled floors and whirring ceiling fans pushing 90 degree heat out the open windows, beyond the balustrade to the paddy fields that subsume the outskirts of Cambodia's capital, Phnom Penh.This school is an historic place. It has outlasted several generations of violence. It may outlast several more. It was to this school that I was brought, from Baltimore, to train a cross-section of Cambodian society as interpreters for the first Cambodian elections in 38 years.
NEWS
By Peter S. Goodman and Peter S. Goodman,Contributing Writer | June 22, 1992
PHNOM PENH -- Optimism flows easily here these days.The long-running civil war has ended, at least on paper. The exiled god-king, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, whose ouster in 1970 marked the start of all the trouble, is back in the fairy-tale Royal Palace on the banks of the Mekong river. And the largest, most expensive peacekeeping operation in the history of the United Nations has taken over the town, transforming it from a dazed and desolate shell of a city into a kind of madhouse.White U.N. vehicles dominate the now-bustling traffic, and an international assortment of blue-bereted soldiers pack the once-deserted hotels and restaurants.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | February 4, 2008
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- The fears and profound losses still grip Chum Mei even now, three decades after the brutal Khmer Rouge regime terrorized him and millions of other Cambodians. One of only 10 people known to have survived Toul Sleng prison, where 14,000 died, Chum recalls how the Khmer Rouge arrived in this city in April 1975. Intent on abolishing religion and education, private property and money, the Communist militants ordered everyone to march into the countryside. Chum's infant son died for lack of medical attention on the trek.
FEATURES
November 16, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Host Jason Chambers travels to Cambodia to study the fighting art of pradal serey in Human Weapon (10 p.m., History).
TRAVEL
By Richard P. Carpenter and Richard P. Carpenter,Boston Globe | September 9, 2007
This week's deals include three specialized offers for trips to three distinct places. Although New Englanders have visited islands around the world, many have never seen two Massachusetts ones: Cuttyhunk and the Elizabeth Islands. The Massachusetts Audubon Society will offer day trips there this month. The exploration begins with a 1F-hour boat trip from Woods Hole through Vineyard Sound and Buzzards Bay along the Elizabeth Islands, with commentary focusing on landmarks, geology, wildlife and the history of the quiet, protected islands.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,sun reporter | April 2, 2007
Laurence J. Bourassa, whose long career as an international aid worker took him to countries across Asia and Africa, died of kidney and respiratory failure Thursday at Long Green Center, a long-term care facility in Baltimore. He was 75. Mr. Bourassa's life was most notably shaped by two episodes, friends and colleagues said - his stint in Somalia with the first group of Peace Corps volunteers, which first gave him a taste for overseas humanitarian work, and two harrowing years he spent in Cambodia during the bloody era of the infamous killing fields.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | December 3, 2006
I'm planning a trip to Italy to visit Venice and Florence with my daughter. She is a glass blower and would like to take a factory tour and a class or workshop. Can you help us with ideas? You and your daughter will enjoy Venice and the island of Murano, famous for its glass-blowing artisans. Neither we nor the Italian Tourist Office were able to find classes for your daughter, but she'll get to watch craftsmen at work on Murano. Many factories are connected to glassware shops and are open to the public.
NEWS
By STEPHEN NORDLINGER | May 11, 2006
My wife and I first met Veng Preap on a sultry fall day when we walked into the offices of the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization on a busy street in the center of Siem Reap, near the Angkor Wat complex in Cambodia. We carried a letter from a friend of his in Washington and a pile of World Bank books on international development that Mr. Preap's friend suggested for him. Veng Preap, not his real name to protect his privacy, took us everywhere to see the Angkor monuments and spent evenings speaking with us about his life and such subjects as civil engineering and Buddhism and his views toward organized religion.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 9, 1992
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Man Sareth works to the pounding of hammers and the whirring of drills in an industry that makes a product that is in distressingly strong demand here: artificial legs.Production and consumption come together in Man Sareth, a former soldier, making one leg and wearing two in a country with perhaps the highest percentage of amputees in the world."For the prosthetics industry, business is great over here in Cambodia," his boss, Vietnam veteran Ron Podlaski, said. "We're busily taking care of the brave men, women and children who have been de-mining Cambodia one mine at a time."
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
As the trial of Saddam Hussein was set to open today, Iraq joins the long list of nations - from Germany to South Africa, Yugoslavia to Cambodia - that have tried to deal with a violent and oppressive past to help carve out a more peaceful future based on the rule of law. The experience of these countries has shown that it is a difficult task that could either rally Iraqi society around its nascent democracy or deepen the divisions that threaten to...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2005
Andrea Marie Woloszyn, daughter of John and Gina Woloszyn, of Baltimore, MD, was married on June 11, 2005 to Jonathan Herman Kully, son of Thomas and Sandra Kully, of Chicago, IL. A six o'clock outdoor wedding was held at Conservatory Water Terrace in Central Park, NY City. Fr. Henry Fehren and Rabbi Joel Goor officiated the interfaith ceremony. A reception followed at The Frick Collection. Matron of Honor, Christine Walsdorf, and bridesmaids, Allison Brill, Poppy Buppert, Lori Decillis, Janet Kim, Deborah Kully and Melanie Sventy, attended the bride.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.