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By Mark Feeney and Mark Feeney,The Boston Globe | June 19, 1994
This week's best reading sounds as mundane as mundane can get: a Father's Day tribute to a writer's dad. Yet when the writer is Calvin Trillin, the magazine is the New Yorker (June 20), and the father is as witty as the son, the mundane becomes quite marvelous. Abe Trillin, a man so honorable he at times "seemed to approach the loony side of upright," was a stubborn, sweet-tempered grocer who at too-impressionable an age read about Dink Stover at Yale. From that moment on, he wanted his son to end up an Eli. There weren't too many Jewish families in Kansas City that aspired to such things 50 years ago -- there weren't too many Jewish families in Kansas City, period -- but that didn't discourage Abe. Once he saw the dream fulfilled, he even had the pleasure of following up on it. When son was asked to join one of Yale's senior societies, father had the satisfaction of asking, "That's not the one Stover was in, is it?"
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By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | January 28, 2007
Journalists are usually observers but sometimes they are also the observed - such as when they discuss their own experiences to illuminate a facet of the human condition. Sun reporter Michael Hill's Jan. 21 Ideas section essay, "Grief: On the printed page and, suddenly in your life," an assessment of five books that explore the consequences of loss - was informed by Hill's straightforward acknowledgment of his own pain and struggle after his wife's recent and sudden death. The essay is an excellent example of a journalist using his personal experience to give readers a look at the varied effects of death.
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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 4, 1993
New York--Denny Hansen had the good looks, the brains, the warm personality -- and the brightest smile you ever saw. Classmates at Yale joked about getting a job in Denny's administration when he became president. His presence was so overpowering that his friends' parents would ask, years after the Class of '57 had graduated, "Whatever happened to that Hansen boy -- you know, the one with that great smile?"Denny Hansen killed himself. In February 1991, more than three decades after he had graduated from Yale magna cum laude and headed to England on a Rhodes scholarship, Roger Dennis Hansen went to a friend's house in Rehoboth Beach, Del. There he closed the garage door, started his car and inhaled enough carbon monoxide to take him away from what had become a miserable life.
NEWS
By book review | January 21, 2007
Alice, Let's Eat: Further Adventures of a Happy Eater By Calvin Trillin Originally published in 1978, this was the second of Trillin's three autobiographical books about food (the "Tummy Trilogy"). Guided by an insatiable appetite, Trillin records his gastronomical odyssey - from barbecued mutton in Kentucky to latkes in London - often with his wife, Alice, who died in 2001, at his side. Trillin is a marvelous writer, affable and witty under any circumstances. He's also an extremely enthusiastic eater, so the books are filled with gourmet brio.
NEWS
By book review | January 21, 2007
Alice, Let's Eat: Further Adventures of a Happy Eater By Calvin Trillin Originally published in 1978, this was the second of Trillin's three autobiographical books about food (the "Tummy Trilogy"). Guided by an insatiable appetite, Trillin records his gastronomical odyssey - from barbecued mutton in Kentucky to latkes in London - often with his wife, Alice, who died in 2001, at his side. Trillin is a marvelous writer, affable and witty under any circumstances. He's also an extremely enthusiastic eater, so the books are filled with gourmet brio.
NEWS
By Charles Solomon and Charles Solomon,LA Times "Special Delivery," by Becki and Keith Dilley with Sam Stall. Random House. 255 pages. $21 LA Times | July 9, 1995
"Deadline Poet: My Life as a Doggerelist," by Calvin Trillin. New York: Warner Books. 196 pages. $10.99Inspired by the antics of John Sununu, Calvin Trillin began writing verses about the news for the Nation in 1990. The collected poems recall the work of Ogden Nash, but with political bite. When George Bush retired, Trillin wrote: "We wish you well. Just take your ease,/And never order Japanese./May your repose remain unblighted/Unless of course you get indicted." Trillin's many fans will also enjoy his tongue-in-cheek accounts of the events that inspired his verses: Despite landmark arms-reduction treaties, "SDI lingered, like a dinner guest who hangs around after the party is over and keeps eating."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and By Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff | January 6, 2002
Tepper Isn't Going Out, by Calvin Trillin. Random House. 215 pages. $22.95. If you live in Manhattan and park your car on the streets -- as opposed to paying usurious fees to a garage -- this curious comic novel by Calvin Trillin may be right up your alley. If you're not (and this effectively eliminates some 260 million Americans), it may be considerably less appealing. Murray Tepper is a mild-mannered senior citizen with a strange fixation for parking. He knows all the parking regulations -- Lower East Side, one-hour parking, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. including Sunday; East 78th Street, no parking 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Friday, etc. Once he finds a prime spot, he sits there for hours in his car, reading the newspaper and making annoying little hand gestures that signify "I'm not going out" to motorists who covet his parking space.
FEATURES
By ANN EGERTON | December 23, 1990
Enough's Enough, and Other Rules of Life.Calvin Trillin.Ticknor & Fields.251 pages. $19.95.The Big Garage on Clear Shot: Growing Up, Growing Old and Going Fishing at the End of the Road.Tom Bodett.Morrow.300 pages. $18.95.Calvin Trillin writes essays about social, cultural and, to some degree, political issues. His is a topical urban voice whose sly, cutting wit darts in through the side door. Tom Bodett tells stories of small-town life in Alaska. His is a rural voice whose gentle humor ambles, also through the side door.
NEWS
By Jonathan Kirsch and Jonathan Kirsch,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
About Alice Calvin Trillin Random House / 82 pages / $14.95 When Alice Trillin died in 2001, the headline over the obituary in The New York Times identified her as "Educator, Author and Muse." Of the three roles, she is best known for the last one - Alice was the inspiration for the work of author, columnist and veteran New Yorker contributor Calvin Trillin. "When I wrote in the dedication of a book `For Alice,' I meant it literally," he affirms in About Alice, which is a kind of belated obit of his own. At a scant 82 pages, About Alice is a short and sweet elegy, a slightly expanded version of a piece that ran in The New Yorker earlier this year.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | January 9, 2007
Calvin Trillin has written about his wife, Alice, many times during his long career as an author and staff writer for The New Yorker. She has always shown up - he admits this - dressed as a sitcom character: the sensible wife who punctuates the misadventures and foibles of her befuddled husband with a wry comment. But in 1976, when she was 38 and their daughters were 4 and 7, Alice was diagnosed with lung cancer and given a 10 percent chance of survival. She lived an improbable 25 more years, long enough to see both girls married to men who might reasonably be expected to be around for the long haul.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | January 9, 2007
Calvin Trillin has written about his wife, Alice, many times during his long career as an author and staff writer for The New Yorker. She has always shown up - he admits this - dressed as a sitcom character: the sensible wife who punctuates the misadventures and foibles of her befuddled husband with a wry comment. But in 1976, when she was 38 and their daughters were 4 and 7, Alice was diagnosed with lung cancer and given a 10 percent chance of survival. She lived an improbable 25 more years, long enough to see both girls married to men who might reasonably be expected to be around for the long haul.
NEWS
By Jonathan Kirsch and Jonathan Kirsch,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
About Alice Calvin Trillin Random House / 82 pages / $14.95 When Alice Trillin died in 2001, the headline over the obituary in The New York Times identified her as "Educator, Author and Muse." Of the three roles, she is best known for the last one - Alice was the inspiration for the work of author, columnist and veteran New Yorker contributor Calvin Trillin. "When I wrote in the dedication of a book `For Alice,' I meant it literally," he affirms in About Alice, which is a kind of belated obit of his own. At a scant 82 pages, About Alice is a short and sweet elegy, a slightly expanded version of a piece that ran in The New Yorker earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and By Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff | January 6, 2002
Tepper Isn't Going Out, by Calvin Trillin. Random House. 215 pages. $22.95. If you live in Manhattan and park your car on the streets -- as opposed to paying usurious fees to a garage -- this curious comic novel by Calvin Trillin may be right up your alley. If you're not (and this effectively eliminates some 260 million Americans), it may be considerably less appealing. Murray Tepper is a mild-mannered senior citizen with a strange fixation for parking. He knows all the parking regulations -- Lower East Side, one-hour parking, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. including Sunday; East 78th Street, no parking 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Friday, etc. Once he finds a prime spot, he sits there for hours in his car, reading the newspaper and making annoying little hand gestures that signify "I'm not going out" to motorists who covet his parking space.
NEWS
By Charles Solomon and Charles Solomon,LA Times "Special Delivery," by Becki and Keith Dilley with Sam Stall. Random House. 255 pages. $21 LA Times | July 9, 1995
"Deadline Poet: My Life as a Doggerelist," by Calvin Trillin. New York: Warner Books. 196 pages. $10.99Inspired by the antics of John Sununu, Calvin Trillin began writing verses about the news for the Nation in 1990. The collected poems recall the work of Ogden Nash, but with political bite. When George Bush retired, Trillin wrote: "We wish you well. Just take your ease,/And never order Japanese./May your repose remain unblighted/Unless of course you get indicted." Trillin's many fans will also enjoy his tongue-in-cheek accounts of the events that inspired his verses: Despite landmark arms-reduction treaties, "SDI lingered, like a dinner guest who hangs around after the party is over and keeps eating."
FEATURES
By Mark Feeney and Mark Feeney,The Boston Globe | June 19, 1994
This week's best reading sounds as mundane as mundane can get: a Father's Day tribute to a writer's dad. Yet when the writer is Calvin Trillin, the magazine is the New Yorker (June 20), and the father is as witty as the son, the mundane becomes quite marvelous. Abe Trillin, a man so honorable he at times "seemed to approach the loony side of upright," was a stubborn, sweet-tempered grocer who at too-impressionable an age read about Dink Stover at Yale. From that moment on, he wanted his son to end up an Eli. There weren't too many Jewish families in Kansas City that aspired to such things 50 years ago -- there weren't too many Jewish families in Kansas City, period -- but that didn't discourage Abe. Once he saw the dream fulfilled, he even had the pleasure of following up on it. When son was asked to join one of Yale's senior societies, father had the satisfaction of asking, "That's not the one Stover was in, is it?"
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
It's the Rodney Dangerfield of confections -- rich, successful, unmistakable and, in some circles, utterly without respect.It's a hallowed family tradition, it's standard late-show humor. It's a business that includes great big bakeries, bit players, high school bands and Trappist monks. It's a seasonal treat, a yearlong guilty habit, a lifelong running joke and a litmus test of family relationships.Ah, fruitcake. To know it is to love it or hate it -- no messing with Mr. or Ms. In-between when it comes to the dense loaf of candied fruit (usually)
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | January 28, 2007
Journalists are usually observers but sometimes they are also the observed - such as when they discuss their own experiences to illuminate a facet of the human condition. Sun reporter Michael Hill's Jan. 21 Ideas section essay, "Grief: On the printed page and, suddenly in your life," an assessment of five books that explore the consequences of loss - was informed by Hill's straightforward acknowledgment of his own pain and struggle after his wife's recent and sudden death. The essay is an excellent example of a journalist using his personal experience to give readers a look at the varied effects of death.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
It's the Rodney Dangerfield of confections -- rich, successful, unmistakable and, in some circles, utterly without respect.It's a hallowed family tradition, it's standard late-show humor. It's a business that includes great big bakeries, bit players, high school bands and Trappist monks. It's a seasonal treat, a yearlong guilty habit, a lifelong running joke and a litmus test of family relationships.Ah, fruitcake. To know it is to love it or hate it -- no messing with Mr. or Ms. In-between when it comes to the dense loaf of candied fruit (usually)
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 4, 1993
New York--Denny Hansen had the good looks, the brains, the warm personality -- and the brightest smile you ever saw. Classmates at Yale joked about getting a job in Denny's administration when he became president. His presence was so overpowering that his friends' parents would ask, years after the Class of '57 had graduated, "Whatever happened to that Hansen boy -- you know, the one with that great smile?"Denny Hansen killed himself. In February 1991, more than three decades after he had graduated from Yale magna cum laude and headed to England on a Rhodes scholarship, Roger Dennis Hansen went to a friend's house in Rehoboth Beach, Del. There he closed the garage door, started his car and inhaled enough carbon monoxide to take him away from what had become a miserable life.
FEATURES
By ANN EGERTON | December 23, 1990
Enough's Enough, and Other Rules of Life.Calvin Trillin.Ticknor & Fields.251 pages. $19.95.The Big Garage on Clear Shot: Growing Up, Growing Old and Going Fishing at the End of the Road.Tom Bodett.Morrow.300 pages. $18.95.Calvin Trillin writes essays about social, cultural and, to some degree, political issues. His is a topical urban voice whose sly, cutting wit darts in through the side door. Tom Bodett tells stories of small-town life in Alaska. His is a rural voice whose gentle humor ambles, also through the side door.
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