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By Elizabeth Large | August 14, 1994
Fashion designer Calvin Klein is known for his stunningly classic lines and colors with names like dove, vanilla, parchment and ink. Look for those characteristics in his new home collection, which will debut next year. Calvin Klein Inc. has licensed the use of its trademark to Home Innovations Inc. to produce sheets, towels, silverware, glassware, dinnerware, furniture and other decorative accessories for the home.You'll be able to find his lines in department and specialty stores, as well as a flagship store scheduled to open next spring on Madison Avenue in New York.
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Lorraine Mirabella | September 12, 2013
  Michael Kors has opened its first outlet store in the Baltimore area at Arundel Mills mall, the center announced.  The new store is located in the Hanover mall's Neighborhood 4 Fashion Wing, across from Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5th and Coach Factory Store. Shoppers will find the brand's collection of American classic apparel and accessories such as handbags, wallets, shoes and watches -- at a discount. The shop joins apparel outlet stores such as Ann Taylor Factory Store, Banana Republic Factory Store, Calvin Klein, J.Crew Factory, Neiman Marcus Last Call and Vince Camuto Outlet.
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By TAMARA IKENBERG and TAMARA IKENBERG,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
Calvin Klein may have a way with slick fashion. But he has a more domestic side too, and his new spring bed and bath line reflects that. The Down and Feather Collection includes sumptuously soft pillows, comforters and mattress pads with the famous label. The Khaki Collection has an even wider selection of sheets, shams and duvet covers in playful plaids, indigos and more. Prices range from $17.50 for a bath towel to $500 for a queen down comforter. Call 1-800-294-7978 for store locations.
FEATURES
By Hilary Phelps, For The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 12, 2012
Macy's secured a suite - aptly named the Macy's Lounge - inside the Empire Hotel as a place for fashionistas to relax between the fashions shows held in Lincoln Center. Situated directly across the street, it was easy to pop in for a quick snack or a suitable place to wind down for a few moments. Upon entering the suite, visitors could take a seat on the lush couches in the center room or enter one of the rooms off to either side. On one side was a room that held pieces from Nicole Richie's capsule collection, which she designed for the retailer.
FEATURES
By Amy M. Spindler and Amy M. Spindler,New York Times News Service | July 7, 1994
Calvin Klein has hired Gabriella Forte, one of Italy's most powerful fashion executives, to be president and chief operating officer of Calvin Klein Inc.Ms. Forte, who was executive vice president of Giorgio Armani and head of its U.S. operations, is so closely linked to Mr. Armani that she often spoke for him in the first person. As Mr. Armani's right hand, Ms. Forte personified the tough and articulate buffer needed by creative personalities whose names are on labels."I think the position that was offered me was very exciting," said Ms. Forte, calling from Milan.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | November 17, 1993
London Fog Corp. announced yesterday the appointment of a top menswear executive at Calvin Klein Inc. as its new vice chairman and executive vice president to spearhead the company's move into a more upscale line.The appointment of John Varvatos, 38, is part of an overall restructuring at the Eldersburg-based outerwear and raincoat maker as the company attempts to recover from the recession, changing sales patterns and a heavy debt load.The move was announced by Arnold Cohen, who took over as chairman and chief executive of London Fog in August after leaving his post as president of J. Crew Group Inc.Mr.
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By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,THE HARTFORD COURANT | November 9, 2003
It had to have been a bittersweet moment when Calvin Klein recently watched his spring 2004 collection hit the runway during Fashion Week in New York. It wasn't his. Neither was the company that bears his name. Klein watched as the brand he built trotted out the first collection by Francisco Costa, an ex-Gucci designer who now heads Calvin Klein's women's collection. That's because last year Klein sold his company to Phillips-Van Heusen for $438 million, effectively ending the rags-to-rag-trade-riches story of a Bronx boy who became an icon of American fashion.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | March 28, 1996
NEW YORK -- Fashion Week here is off to hissy fits and starts as designers try to figure out whether they want to bask in circus-like publicity or retreat into their own fashion towers to show their stuff to the select few.America's haute trinity -- Donna Karan, Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein -- are split on the subject. For three years now, the designer brotherhood has been making nice and showing in centralized, temporary tents with enough seating to accommodate mobs of press and buyers.Now Donna and Ralph have pulled out at the 11th hour and decided to show in their own smaller and intimate spaces.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
NEW YORK -- Don't hate fashion designer Matt Nye because he's beautiful, or because he's the companion of media maverick Jann Wenner, or because he's traveled through Europe in five-star style with former boss Ralph Lauren. "Yes, good looks, youth, a level of notoriety, can open doors. For whatever reason people may be curious about me," says Nye, 34, while lounging in his Upper West Side studio. "What you choose to do with those opportunities once they're created is up to you. In the end, it's your work that's going to speak louder than who you're with or what you look like."
FEATURES
By Sharon Overton and Sharon Overton,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 11, 1996
Once we were content to wear the occasional designer label on our T-shirts or jeans.Then we discovered the joy of sleeping on designer sheets.Now everything from soap dishes and cereal bowls to wall paint and mattress covers comes with a designer label. In the '90s, nesting has replaced social climbing, and haute couture has led to home couture. No longer are fashion designers content simply to fill our closets. They're out to fulfill our domestic fantasies as well.Do you long for a home with the patina of old money?
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
Mei Xu took several detours to become a founder of a multimillion-dollar candle and home decor company in Maryland. Xu grew up in China and was swept up with other college students in the government's push to "re-educate" them after the Tiananmen Square uprising in 1989, the year she graduated with a degree in American studies. She was sent to work in a metal and mineral warehouse despite having been trained to become a diplomat since age 12. She quit after a month. She then came to the U.S. to study journalism at the University of Maryland.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | February 6, 2008
A recent article in Newsweek said the new trend in the fashion industry is using real people to sell clothes, instead of the usual thin, gorgeous models who look like they'd kill you for a slice of pizza. In a moment, we'll get into why this will never work. But if this seems like a trend you've heard before, that's only because you have, lots of times. It seems like every few years, people say they're tired of skinny, pouty women and incredibly buff, handsome guys in fashion ads - and they want to see models who look like real people.
NEWS
By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,THE HARTFORD COURANT | November 9, 2003
It had to have been a bittersweet moment when Calvin Klein recently watched his spring 2004 collection hit the runway during Fashion Week in New York. It wasn't his. Neither was the company that bears his name. Klein watched as the brand he built trotted out the first collection by Francisco Costa, an ex-Gucci designer who now heads Calvin Klein's women's collection. That's because last year Klein sold his company to Phillips-Van Heusen for $438 million, effectively ending the rags-to-rag-trade-riches story of a Bronx boy who became an icon of American fashion.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | March 2, 2003
Don't go to Ooh la la because it's one of only a few retail establishments in the bar and restaurant-laden O'Donnell Square section of Canton. Go because it's cool. Stephanie Grandjean's little store sells an eclectic collection of affordable new and vintage clothing for men and women amid a dazzling array of kitsch art and furnishings. Need a little something new to wear to Burger Night at Looney's? Try a $34 denim dress by Elaine Perlou on for size. Going to brunch at Helen's Garden with your boyfriend's parents?
NEWS
By Halle Gaut and By Halle Gaut,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 2002
Until fall, just color me Calvin Calvin Klein has done it again. His makeup line, called Calvin Klein "color," is right on for summer. "Uncomplicated, natural and inspired by fashion" is how Klein describes his latest shades. He has drawn from his women's fashion collection to create new tints for eyes, lips, cheeks and body, too. This season's makeup palette mimics what he showed on the runway: cassis sheer silks and aubergine organzas. Both reflect the idea of deep color paired with transparent texture.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | March 17, 2002
Season after season, when fashion designers reveal their visions for the moment, there often is some synchronicity, a common thread that wends its way through more than one collection. Because, invariably, the style oracles will look at the world around them, the mood of American shoppers, and their creativity and guesswork will lead them to some unified conclusion about a feel, a look, a symbol that the public will want. This spring, the "It" in fashion is the color white. This most pristine and simple of fashion statements is dominant in collections from classy Calvin Klein to girly Anna Sui, from sleek Marc Jacobs to the ever-elegant Oscar de la Renta.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 30, 1995
If you want to understand the majesty of America's greatest art form -- by which I mean, of course, advertising -- look no farther than the recent Calvin Klein jeans controversy.The ads are gone now, but not so you'd notice.As we all know (and I assume that was the point), Calvin Klein has pulled his kiddie-soft-porn ads from TV, magazines, sides of buses, airplane banners, sidewalk sandwich boards, backs of cereal boxes and everywhere else he could think to put them.Now all we do (and I assume this was also the point)
FEATURES
By Elisabeth Bumiller and Elisabeth Bumiller,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 1996
Since her marriage last weekend to John F. Kennedy Jr., Carolyn Bessette has been breathlessly described as the beautiful and brainy new Queen of Camelot. Interviews with friends and former colleagues reveal a more recognizable young woman: a child of affluent suburbia, with less interest in academics than in downtown clubs, whose extraordinary looks, sophistication and ambition propelled her rapidly upward through the fashion industry in New York.Armchair Freudians have also noted the many similarities between Ms. Bessette-Kennedy, as she has chosen to be called, and Kennedy's famous mother, the late Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | February 17, 2002
Two new shows for fashion junkies So it's cold and gray outside -- big deal. Things on the fashion front are pretty hot. Friday finished New York Fashion Week Fall (yes, fall) 2002, when the designing bigwigs (including Betsey Johnson, Kenneth Cole and Calvin Klein) strutted their stuff for buyers and media. And tonight, the Style Network is launching two new shows "dedicated to the clothes horse and beauty junkie in everyone." Take a look: * The Look for Less (9 p.m.) -- The host, Elisabeth Filarski (the oh-so-likable -- and slightly saccharin -- former shoe designer from Survivor II)
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 22, 2000
HALLOWEEN IS coming, and you parents know what that means! It means it's time for you to make fun and creative costumes for your kids! Otherwise you are not as good as the other parents. Even as you read these words, competing parents -- the kind of people whose homes have candles burning in front of statues of Martha Stewart -- are hunched over their workbenches, creating costumes that require more time and effort than you spent planning your wedding. These are the parents you see on the home and family segments of morning TV shows just before Halloween: Host: Our next parent is Mrs. Shirley Hamperwinkle, who has dressed her daughter, Tiffany, as an exact replica of the Eiffel Tower!
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