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Calvin And Hobbes

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By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 16, 1992
As debut day approaches for the new and improved "Calvin and Hobbes," cartoonist Bill Watterson makes this solemn promise: "No other comic strip will have bigger, uglier aliens."That's partly because no Sunday comic will be bigger, period.The slender, reclusive Mr. Watterson, normally as bookish as Calvin's dad, is throwing his weight around like a rampaging Calvinosaurus. Come Feb. 2, when he returns from a nine-month sabbatical, "Calvin and Hobbes" will gobble up half a page each Sunday -- or else.
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By Michael Pakenham | November 12, 1995
"The Comic Strip Century," edited by Bill Blackbeard and Dale Crain. Kitchen Sink Press. Two volumes. 480 pages. $79.95 On the cover, the Yellow Kid, jug-eared progenitor of all that is loved, loathed and celebrated today as the American comic strip, carries his caption as ever on his nightshirt: "Me Mudder wud drop Ded if she seen dis Golleckshun." And so it proceeds. From the Yellow Kid through Calvin and Hobbes and The Far Side, this compilation presents and pays tribute to a century of the glorious genre of art and journalism from 1895 to date.
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FEATURES
April 3, 1994
Bill Watterson, creator of the "Calvin and Hobbes" comic strip, will be on vacation through Dec. 31, 1994. As a replacement, a series of classic "Calvin and Hobbes" strips will appear beginning today until Mr. Watterson returns.
FEATURES
April 4, 1994
Bill Watterson, creator of the "Calvin and Hobbes" comic strip, which appears in The Sunday Sun and The Evening Sun, will be on vacation through Dec. 31, 1994. As a replacement, a series of classic "Calvin and Hobbes" strips will appear beginning today until Mr. Watterson returns.
FEATURES
By Neal Rubin and Neal Rubin,Knight-Ridder | January 15, 1992
As debut day approaches for the new and improved "Calvin and Hobbes," cartoonist Bill Watterson makes this solemn promise: "No other comic strip will have bigger, uglier aliens."That's partly because no Sunday comic will be bigger, period.The slender, reclusive Watterson, normally as bookish as Calvin's dad, is throwing his weight around like a rampaging Calvinosaurus. Come Feb. 2, when he returns from a nine-month sabbatical, "Calvin and Hobbes" will gobble up half a page each Sunday -- or else.
FEATURES
April 4, 1994
Bill Watterson, creator of the "Calvin and Hobbes" comic strip, which appears in The Sunday Sun and The Evening Sun, will be on vacation through Dec. 31, 1994. As a replacement, a series of classic "Calvin and Hobbes" strips will appear beginning today until Mr. Watterson returns.
NEWS
By Michael Pakenham | November 12, 1995
"The Comic Strip Century," edited by Bill Blackbeard and Dale Crain. Kitchen Sink Press. Two volumes. 480 pages. $79.95 On the cover, the Yellow Kid, jug-eared progenitor of all that is loved, loathed and celebrated today as the American comic strip, carries his caption as ever on his nightshirt: "Me Mudder wud drop Ded if she seen dis Golleckshun." And so it proceeds. From the Yellow Kid through Calvin and Hobbes and The Far Side, this compilation presents and pays tribute to a century of the glorious genre of art and journalism from 1895 to date.
FEATURES
By Dennis Love and Dennis Love,The Arizona Republic | July 22, 1991
FOR OUR purposes here, let's assume you are a guy, whether you are or not.Let's also assume that you are reading the comics, whether you do or not.And let's finally assume that the strip you are reading is "Calvin and Hobbes," which is absolutely slaying you because, well, 6-year-old Calvin is in the midst of another school-day fantasy.You catch your breath from laughing, then turn to your wife/your Significant Other/your female companion/any woman within earshot. "Hey," you offer congenially, "did you see 'Calvin' today?"
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 17, 1991
Almost anyone can whip up a dish when he has the necessary ingredients. The challenge comes when most of the fixin's are missing.The other night, for instance, I made stir-fried Chinese broccoli with beef, without the broccoli, but with a pair of pliers.It happened in a time frame well-known around our house for its dramatic culinary events. That would be when Mom is out of town. In the midst of fulfilling my parental responsibilities I had forgotten one small item: Fixing supper. I arrived home from work and realized that my two kids were expecting me to feed them.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 29, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- A Somali version of "Calvin and Hobbes is the most popular part of the American operation to win over the hearts and minds of Somalis.The cartoon strip, in a daily Somali-language paper published by the Army's 4th Psychological Operations Group, features a young Somali camel herder named Elmi and his loyal camel, Mandeeg."People like to read a conversation between two people, so we read Elmi and Mandeeg first," said Abdi Hamid, a 19-year-old Baidoan.In one recent strip, Mandeeg the camel suggested that guns in the hands of so many people were dangerous to everybody.
FEATURES
April 3, 1994
Bill Watterson, creator of the "Calvin and Hobbes" comic strip, will be on vacation through Dec. 31, 1994. As a replacement, a series of classic "Calvin and Hobbes" strips will appear beginning today until Mr. Watterson returns.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 16, 1992
As debut day approaches for the new and improved "Calvin and Hobbes," cartoonist Bill Watterson makes this solemn promise: "No other comic strip will have bigger, uglier aliens."That's partly because no Sunday comic will be bigger, period.The slender, reclusive Mr. Watterson, normally as bookish as Calvin's dad, is throwing his weight around like a rampaging Calvinosaurus. Come Feb. 2, when he returns from a nine-month sabbatical, "Calvin and Hobbes" will gobble up half a page each Sunday -- or else.
FEATURES
By Neal Rubin and Neal Rubin,Knight-Ridder | January 15, 1992
As debut day approaches for the new and improved "Calvin and Hobbes," cartoonist Bill Watterson makes this solemn promise: "No other comic strip will have bigger, uglier aliens."That's partly because no Sunday comic will be bigger, period.The slender, reclusive Watterson, normally as bookish as Calvin's dad, is throwing his weight around like a rampaging Calvinosaurus. Come Feb. 2, when he returns from a nine-month sabbatical, "Calvin and Hobbes" will gobble up half a page each Sunday -- or else.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 17, 1991
Almost anyone can whip up a dish when he has the necessary ingredients. The challenge comes when most of the fixin's are missing.The other night, for instance, I made stir-fried Chinese broccoli with beef, without the broccoli, but with a pair of pliers.It happened in a time frame well-known around our house for its dramatic culinary events. That would be when Mom is out of town. In the midst of fulfilling my parental responsibilities I had forgotten one small item: Fixing supper. I arrived home from work and realized that my two kids were expecting me to feed them.
FEATURES
By Dennis Love and Dennis Love,The Arizona Republic | July 22, 1991
FOR OUR purposes here, let's assume you are a guy, whether you are or not.Let's also assume that you are reading the comics, whether you do or not.And let's finally assume that the strip you are reading is "Calvin and Hobbes," which is absolutely slaying you because, well, 6-year-old Calvin is in the midst of another school-day fantasy.You catch your breath from laughing, then turn to your wife/your Significant Other/your female companion/any woman within earshot. "Hey," you offer congenially, "did you see 'Calvin' today?"
NEWS
May 19, 1995
TEN years ago there was only one sure way to test a child's reading ability. It had nothing to do with the SAT or any other exam and didn't involve a sharpened No. 2 pencil.If you really wanted to know how well a group of kids could read you put them all on a bus and drove them down Baltimore Street. Kids who stuttered over Dick and Jane in the class room could spit out every club name, headliner and advertisement on the Block verbatim as it flashed by at 30 mph through a grimy school bus window.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Anyone who has a cat -- or knows even the slightest thing about kitty behavior -- knows that the idea of washing a cat is a bad, bad, baaaaaaad idea. Unless you have death wish. Luckily, cats are kind of self-cleaning anyway. But when a bottle of Vet's Best Natural Formula No-Rinse Foam Waterless Cat Bath came into the office, I knew we had to test it. If there was a way to get a cat cleaner without trying to actually bathe him, I thought folks would be interested. The cat bath, widely available, sells for $6 to $8 for a four-ounce bottle.
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