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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Archaeologists digging in a meadow here said today they have uncovered what they believe is the crypt of Maryland's founding family, the Calverts, beneath the ruins of the 300-year-old Great Brick Chapel.A week of digging in what had been the north arm of the cross-shaped church ended today in the discovery of not one, but three, gray lead coffins.The coffins, bowed by the weight of the earth above them, lay side by side in a pit 3 feet deep and about 5 feet square.Henry Miller, chief archaeologist for Historic St. Mary's City, said the prestigious location of the crypt within the chapel and the cost and rarity of lead coffins in the 1600s led him to conclude that the coffins belong to Maryland's founding family.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Lou Ruth Blake was the family's matriarch who sang in the church choir and organized gospel shows. Lowell Frederick Blake liked to make people laugh. Venessa Marie Blake was the ardent churchgoer with a contagious smile. All three family members died within days of each other earlier this month from complications of the flu — a cluster that state officials acknowledged was unusual. Their deaths caused a stir in the community of Lusby in Calvert County, where Blake family roots run deep in the town of nearly 1,600.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | May 31, 1991
Scientists planning the study of three 17th-century lead coffins discovered last November in St. Mary's City say they may try to match any genetic material found in the coffins to that of a modern-day descendant of Maryland's founding Calvert family.Forensic anthropologist Clyde Collins Snow said today that if no nameplates or other conclusive identification are found inside the coffins, a DNA, or genetic, match may be attempted. But its success will hinge on several critical problems:"Whether we can extract this [genetic]
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 9, 2012
State health officials say today that lab tests confirm all four members of a Calvert County family striken with a severe respiratory illness in recent weeks had the H3N2 strain of influenza A, a strain of the flu that has been going around this season. Three have since died. At least two of the cases were complicated by bacterial infections with methicillin-resistent Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, according to the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene . Additional lab testing and investigation continue, but the health officials said there still have been no other clusters of severe respiratory illness in the state discovered.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The crypt beneath Chapel Field in St. Mary's City has a name again -- Calvert. And one of its dead has a face.Scientists and historians concluded unanimously yesterday that the adult remains found in the coffins unearthed in Maryland's vanished Colonial capital are those of Philip Calvert, the colony's first chancellor who died in 1682, and his first wife, Ann Wolsey Calvert, who died about 1680.The infant girl found buried beside the couple in November 1992 remains unidentified.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY F. MALONEY and SHEILA ELLIS HIXSON | March 11, 1993
No four words have prompted more debate among Marylanders in the last century. Historians, legislators and women's groups have been arguing what our state motto is -- or should be -- since at least 1884.Today, 49 of the 50 states have a motto. ''Manly Deeds, Womanly Words'' is hardly the most controversial. In New Hampshire, pacifist drivers have sued to remove ''Live Free or Die'' from their license tags. Presumably, atheists in Ohio feel the same way about their state's motto, ''With God, All Things are Possible.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- As his name might suggest, Charles Baltimore Calvert has more than a little interest in this week's opening of three lead coffins from what may be the 17th century crypt of Maryland's founding Calvert family."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Three 17th-century lead coffins unearthed last December in St. Mary's City may yield their secrets -- including whether they contain members of Maryland's founding Calvert family -- as early as this fall.A panel of top experts on subjects ranging from neutron radiography to human remains met here yesterday to map out a plan for finding out who was buried in the coffins and what they can reveal about life in Colonial America."This is truly a unique project in the annals of American archaeology," said Henry Miller, director of research at Historic St. Mary's City, the site of Maryland's 1634 settlement.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
ANNAPOLIS -- With an historical flourish, Del. Timothy F. Maloney tried yesterday to render moot the long-standing debate over the state's motto.The Prince George's County Democrat was testifying on the latest attempt to erase the words "Fatti maschii parole femine" from the Great Seal of Maryland -- a bill introduced by Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat. The bill would simply eliminate those words from the description of the seal in state law.According to that law, the Italian phrase is "loosely translated as 'Manly deeds, womanly words,' " giving the state a motto that has offended many down through the years, from suffragettes to feminists, the politically correct to the personally sensitive.
NEWS
By EDWARD C. PAPENFUSE | March 25, 1993
Annapolis -- On this page March 11, Delegates Tim Malone and Sheila Hixson provided a clear and compelling argument that ''Fatti Maschii Parole Femine'' is not the state motto, but it belongs to George Calvert. It should be retained with any representation of the 1648 Great Seal of Maryland. To remove it would be to tamper with an important link to Maryland's colonial achievements, not the least of which were the Calvert efforts to provide a context for religious freedom far in advance of what England had to offer.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The crypt beneath Chapel Field in St. Mary's City has a name again -- Calvert. And one of its dead has a face.Scientists and historians concluded unanimously yesterday that the adult remains found in the coffins unearthed in Maryland's vanished Colonial capital are those of Philip Calvert, the colony's first chancellor who died in 1682, and his first wife, Ann Wolsey Calvert, who died about 1680.The infant girl found buried beside the couple in November 1992 remains unidentified.
NEWS
By EDWARD C. PAPENFUSE | March 25, 1993
Annapolis -- On this page March 11, Delegates Tim Malone and Sheila Hixson provided a clear and compelling argument that ''Fatti Maschii Parole Femine'' is not the state motto, but it belongs to George Calvert. It should be retained with any representation of the 1648 Great Seal of Maryland. To remove it would be to tamper with an important link to Maryland's colonial achievements, not the least of which were the Calvert efforts to provide a context for religious freedom far in advance of what England had to offer.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY F. MALONEY and SHEILA ELLIS HIXSON | March 11, 1993
No four words have prompted more debate among Marylanders in the last century. Historians, legislators and women's groups have been arguing what our state motto is -- or should be -- since at least 1884.Today, 49 of the 50 states have a motto. ''Manly Deeds, Womanly Words'' is hardly the most controversial. In New Hampshire, pacifist drivers have sued to remove ''Live Free or Die'' from their license tags. Presumably, atheists in Ohio feel the same way about their state's motto, ''With God, All Things are Possible.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
ANNAPOLIS -- With an historical flourish, Del. Timothy F. Maloney tried yesterday to render moot the long-standing debate over the state's motto.The Prince George's County Democrat was testifying on the latest attempt to erase the words "Fatti maschii parole femine" from the Great Seal of Maryland -- a bill introduced by Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat. The bill would simply eliminate those words from the description of the seal in state law.According to that law, the Italian phrase is "loosely translated as 'Manly deeds, womanly words,' " giving the state a motto that has offended many down through the years, from suffragettes to feminists, the politically correct to the personally sensitive.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 14, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- There were no quick and easy answers yesterday for the scientists who opened the last of three 300-year-old lead coffins discovered here two years ago.But, like nearly everything else about this project, the adult skeleton uncovered in the ruins of Maryland's first Colonial capital will provide a team of researchers with priceless information about life, health and environmental issues in 17th-century America."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- As his name might suggest, Charles Baltimore Calvert has more than a little interest in this week's opening of three lead coffins from what may be the 17th century crypt of Maryland's founding Calvert family."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- In a sort of dress rehearsal for the excavation later this year of three lead coffins believed to hold the remains of Maryland's founding Calvert family, scientists have entered another 17th-century churchyard crypt to study the coffins of Maryland's first royal governor and his wife.Experts entered the massive brick burial vault of Sir Lionel Copley and his wife, Anne, in the Trinity Episcopal churchyard April 30. The Copleys died in St. Mary's City in 1694. At a news conference here yesterday, scientists said the daylong entry into the Copley vault, done with permission of church officials, provided them with important data on the construction of lead coffins in the 17th century.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- In a sort of dress rehearsal for the excavation later this year of three lead coffins believed to hold the remains of Maryland's founding Calvert family, scientists have entered another 17th century churchyard crypt to study the coffins of Maryland's first royal governor and his wife.Experts on April 30 entered the massive brick burial vault of Sir Lionel Copley and his wife, Anne, in the Trinity Episcopal churchyard. The Copleys died in St. Mary's City in 1694. At a news conference here yesterday, scientists said the daylong entry into the Copley vault, done with permission of church officials, provided them with important data on the construction of lead coffins in the 17th century.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- In a sort of dress rehearsal for the excavation later this year of three lead coffins believed to hold the remains of Maryland's founding Calvert family, scientists have entered another 17th-century churchyard crypt to study the coffins of Maryland's first royal governor and his wife.Experts entered the massive brick burial vault of Sir Lionel Copley and his wife, Anne, in the Trinity Episcopal churchyard April 30. The Copleys died in St. Mary's City in 1694. At a news conference here yesterday, scientists said the daylong entry into the Copley vault, done with permission of church officials, provided them with important data on the construction of lead coffins in the 17th century.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- In a sort of dress rehearsal for the excavation later this year of three lead coffins believed to hold the remains of Maryland's founding Calvert family, scientists have entered another 17th century churchyard crypt to study the coffins of Maryland's first royal governor and his wife.Experts on April 30 entered the massive brick burial vault of Sir Lionel Copley and his wife, Anne, in the Trinity Episcopal churchyard. The Copleys died in St. Mary's City in 1694. At a news conference here yesterday, scientists said the daylong entry into the Copley vault, done with permission of church officials, provided them with important data on the construction of lead coffins in the 17th century.
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