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Calvert Curriculum

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NEWS
November 30, 1993
Three years ago, Barclay School in Charles Village entered a partnership with Baltimore's private Calvert School. The world-famous Calvert curriculum, first developed for home study during a turn-of-the-century whooping cough epidemic, was instituted grade-by-grade starting with kindergarten and first grade.The Abell Foundation financed the partnership over the strenuous objections of School Superintendent Richard Hunter, who lost his job (with a huge assist from Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke) in large part because he played the narrow-minded bureaucrat in the Barclay-Calvert affair.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Stephen Henderson and Liz Bowie and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1998
At first glance, the most recent test scores from Baltimore's elementary schools look like the vital signs of a patient in intensive care.Thousands of the city's public school students progressed only a few months in their 180 days, and many schools seemed to slump in the second grade.The results for some grades so depressed school board President J. Tyson Tildon that he remarked: "I want to cry."But take a closer look, some experts said yesterday, and the patient's vital signs may not be critical.
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NEWS
December 27, 1994
One of the big education fights that contributed to the ouster of former Baltimore school superintendent Richard Hunter five years ago concerned the request by the city's Barclay School to adopt the private Calvert School's curriculum. Dr. Hunter fought it even after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke suggested the experiment wouldn't be such a bad idea.After four years of operation, Barclay's educational performance has now been evaluated by Sam Stringfield, a Johns Hopkins University researcher.His verdict: The Calvert curriculum continues to yield marked improvements in Barclay's student performance.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1998
GERTRUDE WILLIAMS tangled with two superintendents and beat them both.Richard C. Hunter lost his job in part because he underestimated the principal of Barclay School. A few years later, Walter G. Amprey beat a hasty retreat after trying to show Williams who had the power.She did.It was the curriculum of the private Calvert School that established Williams' reputation, that and her in-your-face style. Installing the Calvert program at Barclay, a Charles Village public school where nine of 10 students live in poverty, she demonstrated that poor kids can learn, too. She made Barclay perhaps Maryland's most famous public school, visited by educators and journalists from around the world.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
The principal of the Barclay School, who fought for years before winning the right to use the private Calvert School curriculum in her city elementary-middle school, said yesterday that the two schools are ending their formal partnership.The six-year relationship with the Calvert School fell victim to a state-required test, the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program, Principal Gertrude Williams said.Even though students were performing well in the classroom and on standardized tests, third-graders faltered on the last state test, and the school decided it had to adjust its curriculum to offer more MSPAP preparation, Ms. Williams said.
NEWS
January 26, 1995
The articles in The Sunday Sun by Gary Gately and Mike Bowler on lessons learned from the use of the Calvert School curriculum at two city public schools give plenty of food for thought.Here is a curriculum, initially intended for home study and for use by the private North Baltimore school, which demonstrably achieves results.Or, as Sam Stringfield, a Johns Hopkins researcher, recently concluded in an evaluation: "A striking feature of Calvert School is the universally high level of confidence that Calvert students can excel academically.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
A partnership between the city's Barclay School and an exclusive private school continues to yield marked improvements in student performance, far outpacing those of Baltimore's high-profile "Tesseract" school-privatization experiment.During each of its first four years, a new evaluation shows, the unique collaboration between Barclay and the private Calvert School in North Baltimore raised standardized test scores. Those scores are now at or above national averages for both public and private schools.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | January 22, 1995
From the private Calvert School in North Baltimore to homes and military bases throughout the world to poor, inner-city public schools, the "Calvert Way" works.Carmalina Scott has no doubt about the success of the back-to-basics program.Her son Michael Gray, 6, began using the Calvert curriculum in the first grade at the city's Carter G. Woodson Elementary this year. Now, when he brings home his work, written in perfect script, other parents marvel."The parents will ask him, 'Michael, who taught you how to write cursive in the first grade?
NEWS
December 28, 1993
Four years ago, parents, teachers and leaders in the community around Baltimore's public Barclay Elementary School took a look at the curriculum of the private Calvert School, liked what they saw and approached the North Avenue administration about entering into a partnership with Calvert.The reaction was hostile. True, the Calvert curriculum had stood the test of nearly a century, but it hadn't been worked over by curriculum committees, passed through the bureaucratic hoops and approved by then-Superintendent Richard Hunter.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
With cheers and a standing ovation for longtime Principal Gertrude Williams, parents at Barclay School yesterday called on Baltimore school officials to reconsider her proposed transfer.Yesterday's meeting of Barclay's Parent-Teacher Organization was initially called to plan a demonstration against transferring Ms. Williams, but became a polite protest.About 80 parents and area residents lauded the outspoken leader who has been at Barclay for 26 years, 22 of them as principal. One woman waved overhead a hand-lettered sign: "Let us keep the little Big woman at Barclay School No. 54."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
The principal of the Barclay School, who fought for years before winning the right to use the private Calvert School curriculum in her city elementary-middle school, said yesterday that the two schools are ending their formal partnership.The six-year relationship with the Calvert School fell victim to a state-required test, the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program, Principal Gertrude Williams said.Even though students were performing well in the classroom and on standardized tests, third-graders faltered on the last state test, and the school decided it had to adjust its curriculum to offer more MSPAP preparation, Ms. Williams said.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
With cheers and a standing ovation for longtime Principal Gertrude Williams, parents at Barclay School yesterday called on Baltimore school officials to reconsider her proposed transfer.Yesterday's meeting of Barclay's Parent-Teacher Organization was initially called to plan a demonstration against transferring Ms. Williams, but became a polite protest.About 80 parents and area residents lauded the outspoken leader who has been at Barclay for 26 years, 22 of them as principal. One woman waved overhead a hand-lettered sign: "Let us keep the little Big woman at Barclay School No. 54."
NEWS
January 26, 1995
The articles in The Sunday Sun by Gary Gately and Mike Bowler on lessons learned from the use of the Calvert School curriculum at two city public schools give plenty of food for thought.Here is a curriculum, initially intended for home study and for use by the private North Baltimore school, which demonstrably achieves results.Or, as Sam Stringfield, a Johns Hopkins researcher, recently concluded in an evaluation: "A striking feature of Calvert School is the universally high level of confidence that Calvert students can excel academically.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | January 22, 1995
From the private Calvert School in North Baltimore to homes and military bases throughout the world to poor, inner-city public schools, the "Calvert Way" works.Carmalina Scott has no doubt about the success of the back-to-basics program.Her son Michael Gray, 6, began using the Calvert curriculum in the first grade at the city's Carter G. Woodson Elementary this year. Now, when he brings home his work, written in perfect script, other parents marvel."The parents will ask him, 'Michael, who taught you how to write cursive in the first grade?
NEWS
December 27, 1994
One of the big education fights that contributed to the ouster of former Baltimore school superintendent Richard Hunter five years ago concerned the request by the city's Barclay School to adopt the private Calvert School's curriculum. Dr. Hunter fought it even after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke suggested the experiment wouldn't be such a bad idea.After four years of operation, Barclay's educational performance has now been evaluated by Sam Stringfield, a Johns Hopkins University researcher.His verdict: The Calvert curriculum continues to yield marked improvements in Barclay's student performance.
NEWS
December 26, 1994
After four years of experimenting with an alternative curriculum, the Barclay School has its children performing better than kids at other city public elementary schools, according to an assessment by the Johns Hopkins University.This is no surprise to Principal Gertrude S. Williams. She risked her career by fighting former Supt. Richard Hunter to get the experiment. Dr. Hunter stubbornly said "no". He refused even after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said "yes", which is one reason Dr. Hunter is no longer in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
The private Calvert School, whose collaboration with the city's Barclay School has surpassed the most optimistic expectations, is expanding to another public school in the fall.Calvert will take its detailed curriculum stressing mastery of the basics -- along with materials, support staff and training -- to Carter G. Woodson Elementary in Cherry Hill, Superintendent Walter G. Amprey said yesterday.Woodson eventually would serve as a training site for staffers who would become Calvert curriculum coordinators and take its program to other city public schools.
NEWS
December 26, 1994
After four years of experimenting with an alternative curriculum, the Barclay School has its children performing better than kids at other city public elementary schools, according to an assessment by the Johns Hopkins University.This is no surprise to Principal Gertrude S. Williams. She risked her career by fighting former Supt. Richard Hunter to get the experiment. Dr. Hunter stubbornly said "no". He refused even after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said "yes", which is one reason Dr. Hunter is no longer in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
A partnership between the city's Barclay School and an exclusive private school continues to yield marked improvements in student performance, far outpacing those of Baltimore's high-profile "Tesseract" school-privatization experiment.During each of its first four years, a new evaluation shows, the unique collaboration between Barclay and the private Calvert School in North Baltimore raised standardized test scores. Those scores are now at or above national averages for both public and private schools.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
The private Calvert School, whose collaboration with the city's Barclay School has surpassed the most optimistic expectations, is expanding to another public school in the fall.Calvert will take its detailed curriculum stressing mastery of the basics -- along with materials, support staff and training -- to Carter G. Woodson Elementary in Cherry Hill, Superintendent Walter G. Amprey said yesterday.Woodson eventually would serve as a training site for staffers who would become Calvert curriculum coordinators and take its program to other city public schools.
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