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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 18, 2012
A half hour is all you need to maintain proper weight, get your blood flowing and improve health, according to the Society for Vascular Surgery, which forwarded us a list of calories burned by various winter sports from Livestrong.com. In one hour, a 155-160 pound person can burn: +511 calories cross country skiing +365 calories downhill skiing +563 calories playing ice hockey +511 calories ice skating +400 calories shoveling snow by hand There hasn't been any snow here so far this winter, so how about burning : +281 calories bicycling +329 calories carrying golf clubs +211 calories walking the dog “Welcome 2012 as your year to become physically fit and keep your vascular system healthy,” said Dr. Anil Hingorani, a member of the Society for Vascular Surgery.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Ahead of new rules requiring chain restaurants to post calorie counts for their menu items, some of the restaurants are voluntarily introducing lower calorie selections. The new items tend to be salads rather than the main attractions such as burgers and pizza, but they contain an average of 60 fewer calories or a reduction of 12 percent, researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found. The researchers looked at new menu items in 2012 and 2013, ahead of new rules to offer the public nutritional information required by the Affordable Care Act. And they said the results, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, could be the beginning of a trend in calorie reduction at fast food restaurants that aids the obesity epidemic.
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NEWS
By Scott Kahan | March 3, 2010
Last week, I testified in the Maryland Senate and House of Delegates in support of legislation that would require restaurants to post calories alongside prices on menu boards, similar to the laws in New York City and elsewhere. Polls show that customers want this information, and studies show consumers will use it to make healthier choices. Now even the restaurant industry claims to support calorie-disclosure requirements. That's why I doubt the Maryland bill will pass. Let me explain.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 14, 2014
New research suggests that Americans aren't obese because we eat too much. It's because we exercise too little. And by too little I mean, not at all. And whatever exercise we get peaks before the age of 10 - and perhaps as early as 2 - and is in steady decline after that, according to another study. Researchers at Stanford University Medical Center examined 22 years of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a long-term project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
March 28, 2010
A nd now they're coming after our Chicken McNuggets Happy Meals (520 calories), our Venti Double Chocolatey Chip Frappuccinos with whipped cream (670 calories), our Unlimited Soup, Salad and Breadsticks (600 to infinity). Is there no end to the government takeover of our health system? Apparently not, because there it is, in the massive health care reform bill that was just passed, hidden amid other abominations like banning insurance companies from denying coverage to sick children and closing a gap in the prescription drug program for the elderly: In the case of food that is a standard menu item that is offered for sale in a restaurant ... that is part of a chain with 20 or more locations ... the restaurant or similar food establishment shall disclose in a clear and conspicuous manner ... the number of calories contained in the standard menu item.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Ahead of new rules requiring chain restaurants to post calorie counts for their menu items, some of the restaurants are voluntarily introducing lower calorie selections. The new items tend to be salads rather than the main attractions such as burgers and pizza, but they contain an average of 60 fewer calories or a reduction of 12 percent, researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found. The researchers looked at new menu items in 2012 and 2013, ahead of new rules to offer the public nutritional information required by the Affordable Care Act. And they said the results, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, could be the beginning of a trend in calorie reduction at fast food restaurants that aids the obesity epidemic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Marylanders love their crabs — especially when the meat is picked and mixed with cream, cheese, mayo and Old Bay. And while crabs are generally not an unhealthy choice right out of the shell, one serving of a crab dish can pack a third or more of the total recommended daily intake of fat, sodium and calories once the meat is drowned in fatty oils and salt. Area waters in which they are harvested can also mean pollutants. As with any treat, nutritionists say, moderation is key. And when consumers do indulge, an obvious choice is the broiled crab cake that isn't doused in tartar sauce or other goopy toppings.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert jTC and Rita Calvert jTC,Special to The Sun | March 1, 1995
Q: I am trying to have a healthier diet. I recently saw on a cooking show an instructor line a baking pan with wax paper. Can this help eliminate the calories from greasing with butter and then flouring?A: It's most likely the baking pan was being lined with parchment paper, which is now used more frequently than waxed paper to prevent sticking in baking. This treatment can reduce the fat and flour calories that are used to prevent baked goods from sticking. However, you still need to use some Bakers Joy or vegetable spray coating to prevent sticking.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 1996
What are we doing with all that bread and milk, Baltimore? Statistics say three-fourths of women fail to meet the RDA for calcium (largely from milk). Why is it we crave milk during a snowstorm?Did we eat more during the "Blizzard of '96"? Did we need to?What happens when national weight loss month coincides with a blizzard? Do we keep losing or reverse the trend?Did we stock our larders out of irrational fear of being stranded for several months? Or did some primal urge prompt us to pile on the food (and the body fat)
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
— First Lady Michelle Obama applauded the parent company of Olive Garden and Red Lobster Thursday for pledging to cut calories and sodium at its restaurants over the next 10 years. Speaking at the Olive Garden, a restaurant known for its all-you-can eat pastas and breadsticks, Obama called the move by Darden Restaurants, the world's largest full-service restaurant company, an industry "breakthrough" and a key step in her campaign against childhood obesity. "What's good for kids and families can also be good for business," she said.
NEWS
By David Horsey | July 16, 2013
Here is the so-called mystery: Americans are exercising more, but the national obesity rate keeps rising. How can that be? The answer is pretty obvious. As my personal trainer (the only person standing between me and a gut hanging over my belt) has told me many times, "It's all math -- the number of calories burned and the number of calories consumed. " According to data just published in the online journal Population Health Metrics, during the last 10 years, Americans have gotten more active in two-thirds of the nation's counties.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | February 12, 2013
Baltimore-based Under Armour hosted a press event in New York City Tuesday to introduce what the company has dubbed "its biggest ever global marketing campaign. " While the new "I Will" campaign recalls the old "Will you protect this house?" commercial that first helped the company become popular -- the respondents always answered "I will!" -- the new spot released Tuesday focuses on an area that has become increasingly important: high-end technology and innovation. Let's just say that the commercial ends with a woman adjusting the composition and color of her clothing by using a touch screen built into her sleeve.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
This time of year, people have weight loss on their minds. According to a 2012 survey published in the University of Scranton's Journal of Clinical Psychology, losing weight is the No. 1 New Year's resolution. For some Baltimore residents, working toward that goal by eating healthfully has gotten easier over the past year, thanks to the introduction of healthy snacks in their office or school vending machines. In December, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman signed an executive order banning the sale of high-sugar drinks in county buildings and at county-sponsored events; Baltimore City is exploring similar initiatives.
HEALTH
By Krishana Davis, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Meet Donna Wasserman and the self-proclaimed "Y Ladies" (and some male participants, too) who meet Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings at the Towson YMCA for cardio dancing. The class, divided into eight-week sessions, matches choreographed routines with a wide variety of music - Irish, country, hip-hop, big band, classical, R&B and more - for a low- or high-impact workout. Cardio dancing has been offered by the YMCA for more than 30 years, and some of the regulars have been jumping and twirling together for just as long, dancing their way through hip and shoulder replacements, marriages and remarriages, and the losses of loved ones.
HEALTH
By Amy Reed, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is printed here. This week, Amy Reed weighs in on coconut drinks. Coconut products, such as coconut water and coconut cream, are among the hot new items hitting grocery store shelves. Are these drinks beneficial for your health? Coconut water is the liquid inside a young coconut. One cup of coconut water contains about 50 calories and no protein or fat. Coconut water is low in calories, although the amount varies depending on added ingredients such as sugar or juice.
HEALTH
By Anna Bondy, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a weekly guest post. This week, Anna Bondy, dietetic intern, weighs in on summer smoothies. When the weather gets warmer, there is nothing more refreshing than a summer smoothie. But not all smoothies are created equal. You may be surprised to find caffeine, sugar or even herbal supplements in some versions. Whether you're buying a smoothie at your gym, in the mall or as a meal replacement, be an informed consumer.
FEATURES
November 28, 2001
Probably the best thing about holiday time is the food. It also can be the worst thing. A traditional dinner of turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes and other dishes can exceed 2,500 calories, according to Weight Watchers International. And it's not surprising that those calories translate into unwelcome pounds. Weight Watchers offers these suggestions to help keep weight in check: Be realistic. During the holidays it should be sufficient to maintain your present weight, not lose weight.
FEATURES
By Buzz McClain and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Can golf be part of a serious fitness routine, or is it simply a recreational pastime highlighted by driving an electric cart and swinging a club every five minutes? And can golfers even be considered "real" athletes? Now you've got us started. If you want to use your round of golf for health benefits — in addition to dropping your score and having fun — here's how to do it. Give up the cart "It's how you decide to make golf healthy or not," says Joe Plecker.
HEALTH
By Christine Dobmeier, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Christine Dobmeier offers nutrition lifestyle tips. The second leg of the Triple Crown, the 137th running of the Preakness Stakes, takes place this Saturday. With Memorial Day right around the corner, it's also the "home stretch" as you get yourself healthy for the summer season. When running the race to good health, look to the "Triple Crown" of nutrition tips: Include more vegetables and fruits, be mindful of portion sizes and become more active.
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