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By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
April 1 is the official start to the blue crab harvest in Maryland. But don't reach for your mallet just yet. "It's not time for crabs," said Jessica Borowski, a manager at Midtown BBQ and Brew. "It's too cold out. " The crabs seem to agree. The Chesapeake Bay's water temperature hasn't risen enough for the crabs to become active - and catchable. Consumers set on Maryland crabs will see limited availability for now - and prices to match. Prices for Chesapeake Bay crabs are typically high at the start of the season, and people who want them in April will have to pay even more than usual.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
April 1 is the official start to the blue crab harvest in Maryland. But don't reach for your mallet just yet. "It's not time for crabs," said Jessica Borowski, a manager at Midtown BBQ and Brew. "It's too cold out. " The crabs seem to agree. The Chesapeake Bay's water temperature hasn't risen enough for the crabs to become active - and catchable. Consumers set on Maryland crabs will see limited availability for now - and prices to match. Prices for Chesapeake Bay crabs are typically high at the start of the season, and people who want them in April will have to pay even more than usual.
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BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2005
The stained glass blue crab formerly at Baltimore-Washington International Airport certainly evokes Callinectes sapidus, the "beautiful swimmer" of Chesapeake Bay, but its survival skills more resemble a cat's. The 400-pound, 5-foot sculpture, now crated in a Millersville warehouse, is due to return to the airport for its next life after a new $264 million terminal opens May 18. Exactly when and where remains to be determined until officials see "how the new building operates," BWI spokesman Jonathan O. Dean said.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2005
The stained glass blue crab formerly at Baltimore-Washington International Airport certainly evokes Callinectes sapidus, the "beautiful swimmer" of Chesapeake Bay, but its survival skills more resemble a cat's. The 400-pound, 5-foot sculpture, now crated in a Millersville warehouse, is due to return to the airport for its next life after a new $264 million terminal opens May 18. Exactly when and where remains to be determined until officials see "how the new building operates," BWI spokesman Jonathan O. Dean said.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1996
People who don't like crabs? Babette Brady is struggling with the concept. Let's get this right -- you're looking for people who don't like crabs?"You better go to a different state," says Brady, reacting as if you said you're looking for people with three nostrils.You can't blame her. Her family owns Crabtowne USA Inc. in Glen Burnie, where giant inflatable crabs hang from the ceiling, where customers look for the sign of the big, red smiling crab on Crain Highway, where the message board out front lately announces: "ALL YOU CAN EAT CRABS $20.00 PERSON 6-10 p.m."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
The soft-shell crab sandwich would join Maryland's roster of state symbols under legislation passed Monday night by the Senate. The 43-1 vote sends the bill to the House of Delegates, where it faces an uncertain fate. The House has generally been less enthusiastic about symbol bills than the upper chamber. According to the Maryland Manual, the state has 23 state symbols, including the blue crab as state crustacean. Since the blue crab in its recently molted form is the key ingredient in the classic soft-shell sandwich, the bill would make the species Callinectes sapidus doubly symbolic.
NEWS
December 11, 2001
MARYLAND crabbers will be able to work longer days with a longer season next year, but they will not do so cheerfully. Consumers of the Chesapeake blues will find larger crabs on the market, but they will grumble about the higher prices. And the crab-picking houses that have seen their jobs and revenue steadily squeezed may be the most unhappy. The state's tougher crab harvest rules correctly aim to protect the shrinking numbers of Callinectes sapidus in the bay, sparing smaller, younger crabs from capture so they can reproduce.
NEWS
December 22, 1998
THE CHESAPEAKE BAY blue crab lost a lifelong friend last week, as did all creatures of the estuary, great and small.L. Eugene Cronin, a pioneer in bay research and pre-eminent student of the enigmatic crustacean, died at age 81. Until recent weeks, he had been busily editing a series of scientific papers on the Callinectes sapidus, or blue crab, for a definitive 'u encyclopedia of the bay's signature shellfish."
NEWS
May 8, 2014
As summer draws near, Americans anticipate coming delights - a cabin in the woods, a blanket on a beach, a boat on a river. In Maryland, that iconic image is a table laden with steamed crabs. Thus has it been for generations in the "land of pleasant living. " It was with heavy hearts, then, that Marylanders took in the news last week from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater that they could expect another season of relatively scarce, and therefore expensive, blue crabs.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
WAKES lashing the calm bay, searchlights stabbing the starry blackness. The Tangier crab pot fleet sallies from the harbor for another long day's pursuit of Callinectes sapidus, that savory, beautiful swimmer, the Chesapeake blue crab. What we have here is commerce, also culture. But ultimately we have art - the art of crabbing, to be sure; but even more profound, the artistry of the crab. There's a signature, a dance unique to the crab potter's craft. Watch from a vantage point on Tangier as the island's watermen spread out into the bay, spotlights locating the corks that mark the first string of pots.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1996
People who don't like crabs? Babette Brady is struggling with the concept. Let's get this right -- you're looking for people who don't like crabs?"You better go to a different state," says Brady, reacting as if you said you're looking for people with three nostrils.You can't blame her. Her family owns Crabtowne USA Inc. in Glen Burnie, where giant inflatable crabs hang from the ceiling, where customers look for the sign of the big, red smiling crab on Crain Highway, where the message board out front lately announces: "ALL YOU CAN EAT CRABS $20.00 PERSON 6-10 p.m."
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2000
When "Callinectes douglassi" - otherwise known as the blue crab sculpture - returned to Baltimore-Washington International Airport yesterday, Anne Arundel County officials could hardly contain themselves. Grown men gushed. Women cried. And County Executive Janet S. Owens, sparking in a black suit with a rhinestone-studded crab pin, seemed to glow. "I had to dress for the crab," Owens said as she glanced at the sculpture, whose return had been one of her campaign promises. Then, clasping her heart, eyes watering, she added, "It makes me want to cry."
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | August 30, 2006
With the bloated proportions (in miniature) of a Thanksgiving Day parade float, a fast-food calorie count and a puzzle-box construction that defies the most rudimentary of table manners, the fried hard crab is a celebration of culinary excess and old Chesapeake Bay ingenuity. Once a widespread specialty, it still can be found at a smattering of local crab houses, including Tall Oaks in Pasadena, L.P. Steamers in South Baltimore, Gunning's in Hanover and Magothy Seafood Crab Deck and Tiki Bar in Arnold.
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