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NEWS
February 25, 1991
Bonnie K. Duke has started her own calligraphy and laminating business.In addition to doing work for clients, she will perform specialized services for retail stores, particularly retail food operations, gourmet stores, delicatessens, bakeries and seafood markets.Duke was calligrapher for Sutton Place Gourmet, which operated shops in Washington, Alexandria, Va.; and Bethesda, Montgomery County, for six years. She designed and created all of the signs for the chain.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Marcella E. Grice, an artist and calligrapher, died April 13 from complications of heart disease at Sinai Hospital. She was 87. The daughter of an insurance executive and a homemaker, the former Marcella Editha Harman was born in Baltimore and raised in Charles Village. Mrs. Grice, who was known as Editha, graduated in 1942 from Seton High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1946 from what is now Notre Dame of Maryland University. In the 1980s, she earned a master's degree in audio-visual communication from Towson University.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
Muriel M. Parker, who found grace and functionality in the art of calligraphy and inspired thousands of others to pick up a pen and learn the craft, died of cancer Sept. 22 at her Parkville home. She was 87. "My philosophy of calligraphy is simply a confirmation of the basic meaning of the word itself - to create a thing of beauty," Mrs. Parker said in a 1983 interview. "Calligraphy can be everyone's handicraft and from this fact derives the joy I feel as a teacher in seeing the thrill and excitement experienced by each student when the realization comes that it is the angle of the edge of the pen that makes the thicks and thins in italic writing."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
Muriel M. Parker, who found grace and functionality in the art of calligraphy and inspired thousands of others to pick up a pen and learn the craft, died of cancer Sept. 22 at her Parkville home. She was 87. "My philosophy of calligraphy is simply a confirmation of the basic meaning of the word itself - to create a thing of beauty," Mrs. Parker said in a 1983 interview. "Calligraphy can be everyone's handicraft and from this fact derives the joy I feel as a teacher in seeing the thrill and excitement experienced by each student when the realization comes that it is the angle of the edge of the pen that makes the thicks and thins in italic writing."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 20, 2000
The art of Hon'ami Koetsu, the 16th-century Japanese master who has been compared to Leonardo da Vinci for the versatility of his genius, has the deceptive simplicity and deep mystery of a haiku. An aura of sublime perfection seems to permeate the three galleries that make up the Philadelphia Museum of Art's exhibition "The Arts of Hon'ami Koetsu, Japanese Renaissance Master." The show of more than 100 objects, ranging from delicately painted hand scrolls and lacquer furniture to ceramics, decorative screens and Koetsu's exquisite calligraphy, is the first comprehensive retrospective of the master's work ever mounted outside Japan.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 21, 1996
Corina Briceno is a Venezuelan painter who spends time each year in the Amazon rain forest, where she lives among the Yekuana people, absorbs their ancient culture, and introduces it into her paintings, now showing at Gomez. This is message art in which the art, fortunately, does not become subordinate to the message.Symbols old and new, both pictorial and calligraphic, overlay and underlay Briceno's paintings of landscapes, trees, thatched-roof houses and their interiors. A canoe paddle and an airplane point out how the ages-old coexists with the contemporary in today's world.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | June 2, 1996
A roundup of new products and servicesRing-a-DingWhat's a well-wisher to do? Throwing rice at a bridal couple is considered bad for the birds who'll eat it up later, and birdseed is considered messy. Not to worry. The Associated Network Inc. of Lancaster, N.Y., has a new way to send off the bride and groom -- with wedding bells. Gold jingle bells are attached to a card that explains (in a poem) their use. Place the bell/cards in a pretty basket or other receptacle and have each guest take one set as he exits the reception or ceremony.
NEWS
By Staff Report | April 30, 1993
Arthur P. Myers, a Baltimore handwriting expert who worke for the defense in the Lindbergh baby kidnapping case, died Tuesday of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 95.Mr. Myers, a Northeast Baltimore resident described by a reporter in 1981 as a "very polite, very dignified, wispy little gentleman," was still doing many styles of calligraphy on invitations at the time of his death and last testified in court about two years ago.And while he testified in 600 criminal and civil cases from Massachusetts to Washington, he never testified in his most famous case.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | January 6, 1993
Maryland's tropical winters are wonderful. Spring breezed i at about 70 degrees Thursday and again on Monday.You can just taste early summer -- those muddy sports, bird-watching, seed-sprouting days. Hibernating neighbors venture outdoors. Basketballs bounce. Dogs get an extra lap on the leash. Hundreds of squawking sea gulls, ducks and geese get their fill as flocks of people toss bag after bag of tidbits down at the Westminster Community Pond.Our personal energy surges when we're enticed by scent.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
At his drafting board, Avraham Cohen addressed an envelope with a calligraphy pen. The phone rang. "Nah, we love late orders," he told a customer calling from Chicago. "Can you fax it in?"Despite his nonchalant reply, Mr. Cohen had to hustle. He had to get out thousands of new year cards he had designed for customers across the country before the beginning of Rosh Hashana. The Jewish new year, which began last night at sundown, marks the arrival of a time of joy and solemn contemplation. It concludes Oct. 7 with Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish year.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2001
WHEN THE WRITTEN word is transformed from ordinary letters on a page into a unique and stylized art form, the result is called calligraphy. Artists from the calligraphy group Pen in Hand expertly apply this charm and originality to calendars, maps, books, invitations, frames and decorated boxes. The group will display them at its annual show and sale Nov. 2-4 at the Greater Severna Park Chamber of Commerce building. The calligraphers are Lynne Carnes and Joan Machinchick of Arnold, Marilyn Gaver, Suzanne Heany and Jan Lynn of Severna Park, and Tamara Stoneburner of Ashburn, Va. Machinchick speaks for the group when she says that one of the greatest benefits of being a calligrapher is "the intimacy that customers allow them" - the sharing of life's most precious events, such as marriage, birth and death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 20, 2000
The art of Hon'ami Koetsu, the 16th-century Japanese master who has been compared to Leonardo da Vinci for the versatility of his genius, has the deceptive simplicity and deep mystery of a haiku. An aura of sublime perfection seems to permeate the three galleries that make up the Philadelphia Museum of Art's exhibition "The Arts of Hon'ami Koetsu, Japanese Renaissance Master." The show of more than 100 objects, ranging from delicately painted hand scrolls and lacquer furniture to ceramics, decorative screens and Koetsu's exquisite calligraphy, is the first comprehensive retrospective of the master's work ever mounted outside Japan.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 21, 1996
Corina Briceno is a Venezuelan painter who spends time each year in the Amazon rain forest, where she lives among the Yekuana people, absorbs their ancient culture, and introduces it into her paintings, now showing at Gomez. This is message art in which the art, fortunately, does not become subordinate to the message.Symbols old and new, both pictorial and calligraphic, overlay and underlay Briceno's paintings of landscapes, trees, thatched-roof houses and their interiors. A canoe paddle and an airplane point out how the ages-old coexists with the contemporary in today's world.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | June 2, 1996
A roundup of new products and servicesRing-a-DingWhat's a well-wisher to do? Throwing rice at a bridal couple is considered bad for the birds who'll eat it up later, and birdseed is considered messy. Not to worry. The Associated Network Inc. of Lancaster, N.Y., has a new way to send off the bride and groom -- with wedding bells. Gold jingle bells are attached to a card that explains (in a poem) their use. Place the bell/cards in a pretty basket or other receptacle and have each guest take one set as he exits the reception or ceremony.
NEWS
By Staff Report | April 30, 1993
Arthur P. Myers, a Baltimore handwriting expert who worke for the defense in the Lindbergh baby kidnapping case, died Tuesday of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 95.Mr. Myers, a Northeast Baltimore resident described by a reporter in 1981 as a "very polite, very dignified, wispy little gentleman," was still doing many styles of calligraphy on invitations at the time of his death and last testified in court about two years ago.And while he testified in 600 criminal and civil cases from Massachusetts to Washington, he never testified in his most famous case.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | January 6, 1993
Maryland's tropical winters are wonderful. Spring breezed i at about 70 degrees Thursday and again on Monday.You can just taste early summer -- those muddy sports, bird-watching, seed-sprouting days. Hibernating neighbors venture outdoors. Basketballs bounce. Dogs get an extra lap on the leash. Hundreds of squawking sea gulls, ducks and geese get their fill as flocks of people toss bag after bag of tidbits down at the Westminster Community Pond.Our personal energy surges when we're enticed by scent.
NEWS
By Rosalie M. Falter | December 31, 1990
It would hardly seem like New Year's Eve if our thoughts didn't include some changes we would like to make in our lives.Usually, it involves a change in our behavior that we feel would be good for us. It could be something that would help us physically, like going on a diet, exercising or quitting smoking. We might consider stimulating our minds by listening to better music, learning about other cultures, or acquainting ourselves with great literature and art works of the world.We might like to take up a new hobby, such as stamp or coin collecting.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2001
WHEN THE WRITTEN word is transformed from ordinary letters on a page into a unique and stylized art form, the result is called calligraphy. Artists from the calligraphy group Pen in Hand expertly apply this charm and originality to calendars, maps, books, invitations, frames and decorated boxes. The group will display them at its annual show and sale Nov. 2-4 at the Greater Severna Park Chamber of Commerce building. The calligraphers are Lynne Carnes and Joan Machinchick of Arnold, Marilyn Gaver, Suzanne Heany and Jan Lynn of Severna Park, and Tamara Stoneburner of Ashburn, Va. Machinchick speaks for the group when she says that one of the greatest benefits of being a calligrapher is "the intimacy that customers allow them" - the sharing of life's most precious events, such as marriage, birth and death.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
At his drafting board, Avraham Cohen addressed an envelope with a calligraphy pen. The phone rang. "Nah, we love late orders," he told a customer calling from Chicago. "Can you fax it in?"Despite his nonchalant reply, Mr. Cohen had to hustle. He had to get out thousands of new year cards he had designed for customers across the country before the beginning of Rosh Hashana. The Jewish new year, which began last night at sundown, marks the arrival of a time of joy and solemn contemplation. It concludes Oct. 7 with Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish year.
NEWS
February 25, 1991
Bonnie K. Duke has started her own calligraphy and laminating business.In addition to doing work for clients, she will perform specialized services for retail stores, particularly retail food operations, gourmet stores, delicatessens, bakeries and seafood markets.Duke was calligrapher for Sutton Place Gourmet, which operated shops in Washington, Alexandria, Va.; and Bethesda, Montgomery County, for six years. She designed and created all of the signs for the chain.
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