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NEWS
By Mike Nortrup and Mike Nortrup,Contributing writer | April 14, 1991
Montgomery County high-schooler Tom Marr probably didn't know he wasmaking a career decision when he agreed to help a chum broadcast on a local radio station years ago.But he was quickly hooked for life."
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NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- If the calls and e-mails streaming into the offices of the state's congressional delegation are a reliable guide, Marylanders have become more sympathetic to President Clinton since seeing his taped grand jury testimony about his relationship with Monica S. Lewinsky."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew Mirapaul and Matthew Mirapaul,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2001
Jason Freeman is an even-tempered fellow, but the simple act of making a telephone call has been known to push his buttons. Whenever he is put on hold and is forced to endure the supposedly soothing music that oozes out of the handset while he waits, he becomes irritated. "And if it's Pachelbel's `Canon,' I get really annoyed," Freeman said, referring to the repetitive baroque ditty. On-hold melodies and other forms of ambient music have made people so anesthetized, he said, that he decided to do something about it. So he is taking advantage of a free telephone service to create an unusual interactive listening experience that might be thought of as Ma Bell's "Canon."
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
The first step in making Harford schools more user-friendly is a pleasant, caring voice on the telephone."The public is our customer and we have to make them feel they are important to us," Donald R. Morrison, school spokesman, told school secretaries at a seminar Tuesday."
NEWS
November 21, 1990
Schools in the Baltimore area are barely passing in their efforts to teach, according to callers to The Evening Sun's SUNDIAL. Of 289 callers, 33 percent (95 callers) said their schools were excellent, 27 percent (78 callers) said their schools were satisfactory and 40 percent (116 callers) said their schools were failing.A city and county breakdown follows:* Baltimore city: Total, 98; Excellent, 39 percent (38 callers); Satisfactory, 14 percent (14 callers); Failing, 47 percent (46 callers)
NEWS
February 4, 1992
Most callers to SUNDIAL, 218 out of 368 (59 percent), say that handing out free condoms is not an effective way to deal with AIDS, while 150 callers (40 percent) say it is.Concurrently, 205 out of 364 callers (56 percent) say the distribution of free condoms promotes sex among youths, while 159 callers (43 percent) say it doesn't."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as a scientific public opinion poll would be.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Callers to The Evening Sun's SUNDIAL support reducing property taxes, but they don't like the specific changes proposed by the Linowes Commission.Of the 454 people who called, 76 percent [345 callers] agree that property taxes should be reduced, while 24 percent [106 callers] disagreed.Only 34 percent [155 callers] support increasing the sales tax, while 66 percent [298 callers] oppose the idea. The idea of expanding the sales tax to include cigarettes and services was opposed 70 percent [316 callers]
NEWS
September 6, 1991
Most callers to SUNDIAL seem to agree with President Bush's ideas about education in this country. Of 242 callers, more than 90 percent (219 callers) agree that parents need to take greater responsibility for their children's education. Twenty-three callers disagree.Society depends too much on teachers to do the educating, say 182 of 240 callers (75 percent), while 58 callers (24 percent) disagree.Nearly 85 percent, or 203 of 239 callers, support the idea that public schools should receive "report cards," and 15 percent (36 callers)
NEWS
June 7, 1991
The Orioles have not prospered under the ownership of Eli Jacobs, according to a majority of callers to the SUNDIAL service of The Evening Sun. Of 376 callers, 254 said the team had not prospered under him, while 122 callers thought the team had.When asked if the team should be sold to local interests, 260 callers thought they should, while 113 callers disagreed.
NEWS
April 16, 1992
Of 239 callers to SUNDIAL, 140, or 58 percent, say sexual harassment laws are not needed in Maryland cities and counties, while 99 callers (41 percent) say they are needed.Similarly, there does not need to be a state sexual harassment law, according to 132 of 237 callers (55 percent), while 105 callers (44 percent) disagree.Complaints of sexual harassment should continue to be handled by the Human Relations Commission, in the opinion of 138 of 236 callers (58 percent), while 98 callers (41 percent)
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