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NEWS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1990
In a victory for privacy advocates, the Public Service Commission has ordered the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland to allow people to block the display of their phone numbers to subscribers of the Caller ID service.A subscriber to the service currently sees the number of the caller's phone on a display screen next to the subscriber's phone.Under the commission order issued today, C&P must provide a two- or three-digit number to those who do not want their numbers displayed when they dial a subscriber to the Caller ID service.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
There's one topic about which everyone at City Hall can agree: The phones are terrible. Many lack basic features, such as call waiting and caller ID. Some don't tell you when you've received a voice mail. And the city's system is millions of dollars more expensive than other more modern options. Yet, a year after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Comptroller Joan Pratt sparred over which arm of city government had the right to replace the phone system, there's no plan in the works to get that done.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1990
Public reaction to the controversial Caller ID telephone service is about evenly split between those who like it and those who want to get rid of it, according to Frank Heintz, chairman of the Public Service Commission."
NEWS
By Theola Labbé-DeBose, The Washington Post | August 2, 2011
Maryland utility regulators are expanding their investigation into Verizon's 911 service after some emergency calls came through without caller ID or location information. On May 30, police and fire dispatchers in Maryland and Virginia did not receive two key pieces of information that usually accompany an emergency call: the caller's location and the phone number they were calling from, according to the Maryland Public Service Commission. The problem lasted for three hours and affected 911 calls from IP networks and wireless phones, which, according to cell phone industry research, now account for 70 percent of all 911 calls.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | February 17, 1991
While phone companies and civil libertarians square off over the virtues of Caller ID, Corporate America is stockpiling information about its customers by using a similar number-identification technology.The corporate version of Caller ID, known as Automatic Number Identification, is sold by the long-distance telephone companies to a range of commercial customers. Like Caller ID, ANI passes along the numbers -- listed and unlisted -- of incoming calls to commercial customers without the consent or knowledge of callers.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | November 9, 1994
If you're a complaint desk representative at Acme Exploding Bird Trap Co.'s Baltimore office, you will soon be able to look at your telephone and see that your disgruntled caller isn't just 555-1234. You'll know it's Coyote, Wile E.Starting Dec. 1, Bell Atlantic Corp. will offer customers throughout Maryland an enhanced version of its Caller ID service that lets customers see the names as well as the phone numbers of their callers before picking up the phone.The Caller ID Deluxe service, introduced on a trial basis in Virginia earlier this year, will display the name that appears on the caller's telephone account, up to 15 characters, with the last name appearing first.
BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 13, 2006
Are you getting your money's worth from caller ID? Some callers can't be identified because their information is blocked or unavailable, but in other cases the callers aren't named because the customer's phone company simply doesn't want to spend the money to obtain the data. A small Boston Globe test of caller ID accuracy found several instances in which Verizon Communications and Comcast Corp. didn't provide a caller's name because they didn't want to pay the extra money. The price is minimal on a per-call basis - often a penny or less a call - but spread across a telecommunications giant's many customers, it can quickly run into the tens of millions of dollars.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | February 1, 1991
People who don't like the idea of their phone numbers, unpublished or not, showing up on Caller ID devices across the state will get some relief starting Sunday in the form of free blocking.In keeping with last month's order from the Public Service Commission, C&P Telephone Co. plans to start offering free, per-call blocking on Sunday, said commission spokesman Frank Fulton.Touch-tone phone users need only dial a three-digit code -- star, 6,7 -- before placing a call to ensure that their telephone number doesn't pop up on a Caller ID device, which is used in connection with C&P's Caller ID service.
BUSINESS
By Laura Lippmanand Ross Hetrick and Laura Lippmanand Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | November 21, 1990
Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland does not have the technology to provide blocking service for Caller ID subscribers and will ask the Public Service Commission to reconsider its order that such a service be implemented, a C&P spokeswoman said.The commission yesterday ordered C&P to offer callers a free code that would allow them to keep their numbers private when dialing those equipped with Caller ID, a service that displays the caller's number.While Caller ID has been marketed as a way to prevent harassing telephone calls, it is viewed with alarm by privacy advocates, especially those who work with victims of domestic violence.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | December 22, 1990
Losing its first round of appeals yesterday, Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. was again ordered to let customers block the company's controversial Caller ID service.The Public Service Commission turned down the telephone company's request for a rehearing of last month's order that callers should be allowed to keep their telephone numbers private if they choose.The five-member panel of state regulators told the company that it must offer the free Caller ID blocking service within 45 days and send out bill inserts telling people how to prevent their telephone numbers from appearing on special devices that can trace incoming calls.
BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 13, 2006
Are you getting your money's worth from caller ID? Some callers can't be identified because their information is blocked or unavailable, but in other cases the callers aren't named because the customer's phone company simply doesn't want to spend the money to obtain the data. A small Boston Globe test of caller ID accuracy found several instances in which Verizon Communications and Comcast Corp. didn't provide a caller's name because they didn't want to pay the extra money. The price is minimal on a per-call basis - often a penny or less a call - but spread across a telecommunications giant's many customers, it can quickly run into the tens of millions of dollars.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | May 21, 2006
When James Madison wrote the First Amendment, presumably he had no idea that one day it would protect fundraisers who call your house, obtain a donation for what you thought was a good cause and then pocket most of the money. But that's what the amendment does, to the lasting shame of the charity industry and the judges who confused misleading telemarketing spiels with sacred free speech. In a 1988 case involving Baltimore's National Federation of the Blind, the Supreme Court blessed schemes in which only a few pennies on each donated dollar end up with a nonprofit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
If you have only one or two telephone jacks, in odd places, in your house, Siemens Gigaset SL3501 expandable cordless telephone system ($220) might appeal to you. Once you buy the SL3501 base kit, you can create wireless connections with up to four Gigaset SL30 telephones ($150) - or any Siemens 4000 or 4200 series telephone handset. Just plug in your SL3501 base station to the telephone jack, then find locations for the handsets. You'll need a nearby electrical outlet for each phone station; these recharge the handset battery in each handset.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2003
For those of us who know how to save a buck and more efficiently use technology, caller identification boxes seem like a mighty waste of money. After all, an answering machine allows you to screen calls without having to squint at a little box with a telephone number on it to figure out whether you want to pick up or not. Nevertheless, the Olympia OL3000 InfoGlobe ($50) was such a neat gadget that I went ahead and sprang for Caller ID on my home telephone just to see it in action. With a brilliant floating LED display that shows telephone numbers, time and date of calls, current date and day, the Globe made Caller ID worthwhile for my middle-aged eyes.
NEWS
By Jill Kubatko and Jill Kubatko,Sun Staff | April 7, 2002
Flower power is blossoming for a new generation of girls with large daisies and tulips in bold hot pinks, oranges and yellows showing up on bed sheets, comforters, rugs, frames, shelves and desk sets. Target (below right) offers a "Flowers Etc." bed in a bag for $79, which has matching furniture. Hecht's "Pick A Petal Ensemble" starts at $99 for a comforter, bed sheets, sham and skirt. American Girl (top right) features a "Daisy" three-piece bed set at $120. Sears is spreading its garden theme with tulips, daisies and butterflies and in items ranging from $39.99 for comforters and sheets to a $24.99 butterfly rug. Stop and smell the flowers at these stores or check them out online at www.target.
NEWS
August 21, 2000
Subsidiary launched in Columbia to aid security on Internet PricewaterhouseCoopers has launched a new subsidiary, beTRUSTed. The company, with headquarters in Columbia, will provide digital certificates for businesses hoping to conduct secure Internet transactions. Information: www.betrusted.com. Technology firm OK'd to sell phone system MIT Group, a technology company based in Columbia, has received authorization to sell 3Com NBX 100 Business Phone Systems. The all-in-one system includes voice mail, automated attendant, Caller ID, conferencing, call forwarding, messaging and speed dialing.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | November 14, 1990
Caller ID, C & P Telephone's service that allows Maryland customers to know who is calling even before they pick up the phone, could be restricted by the Maryland Public Service Commission even before it's available to county residents.The service, which is expected to be available in Carroll by early next year, is part of Bell Atlantic's IQ Network of high-tech phone functions.In addition to letting you know who is calling, it also allows those you call to see your number as it flashes on a screen.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | December 14, 1990
ONE OF THE WORST cases of phone harassment I know of involved a young woman whose husband died suddenly and unexpectedly.Even before the funeral was over, the calls started coming to the woman's home from a man who made cruel and sordid jokes about her loss.It was obvious that the man had known her husband and hadn't liked him. But the dead man had been in a business that brought him in contact with hundreds of people. Some were competitors. Some were people he had fired or hadn't hired. A few were disgruntled customers.
NEWS
By Foon Rhee and Foon Rhee,Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 30, 1999
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- The South might summon up an image of friendly front porches and "welcome y'all" openness.But Southerners don't take kindly to phone calls disturbing them at home.More so than other Americans, Carolinians and other Southerners have Caller ID so they know who's calling before picking up, a new study says.And now BellSouth is offering a way to check calls without moving a muscle -- the caller's number pops right up on the TV screen. "The ultimate couch potato's telephone gift," spokeswoman Hope Lanier said.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
The pizza delivery rush usually begins about 4 p.m., just before rush-hour commuters make their slow crawl home and night falls on the suburbs.For delivery drivers, the early hours are the calm before the storm, when running steaming hot pizza pies -- and Chinese food and fried chicken -- goes at breakneck speed until well after midnight.But delivery drivers in Howard County have to contend with something besides bad weather and stingy tippers.Last week, Martha Lunsford, 30, a Papa John's driver, was shot in the jaw at point-blank range in the parking lot of an apartment complex on Turnabout Lane in Columbia's Harper's Choice village after she was robbed of $20.Delivering pizzas has gotten scary, said Jeff Benson, 20, a driver for Domino's Pizza in Columbia.
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