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NEWS
March 26, 2006
On March 21, 2006, JAMES N. CALLAS; beloved husband of Aspassia (Skippie) Callas, loving father of Nicholas Callas and his wife Marlene, Adora Keil and her husband Christopher and Christina Flintoft and her husband Robert and the late Peter Callas; loving grandfather of Jennie and Christopher Callas and Theona and James Reynen; devoted brother of Helen Leonard and the late Anastasia and George Relatives and friends may call SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME OF...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Some voices are so unmistakable, so incredibly distinctive that they seem to burn into your memory, even your soul. You don't have to hear such a voice in person; a recording, however old and worn, will do the trick. That's how I fell under the spell of so many great singers from the past. Ponselle. Callas. Bjorling. And Paul Robeson, the subject of "The Tallest Tree in the Forest," a fascinating play written and performed by Daniel Beaty at Arena Stage in a sterling production directed by Moises Kaufman.  With Robeson, of course, you are dealing with much, much more than a deep, enveloping, bottomless tone and vividly communicative phrasing.
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NEWS
June 2, 2004
On Monday, May 31, 2004 MICHAEL GEORGE CALLAS, 83, of Hagerstown, MD, passed away in Norfolk General Hospital, Norfolk, VA. Born in Hagerstown, MD on Thursday, April 14, 1921, he was the son of the late George and Pella (Strataco) Callas. He was the widower of Betty (Kohler) Callas, who passed away in 1994. He was a 1939 graduate of Hagerstown High School and later graduated for Johns Hopkins University in 1943 with a degree in Civil Engineering. Following graduation from Johns Hopkins Mr. Callas entered the U.S. Army during World War II where served in the 29th Engineering Battalion serving in the Philippines, mapping invasions of the South Pacific Islands and Japan, at the conclusion of the war he returned to Johns Hopkins University where received his Master's degree in Structural Engineering in 1947.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Biographical sources differ on when Maria Callas was born -- one book covers all bases by listing her birth date as "Dec. 2, 3 or 4, 1923" -- but every reputable source agrees that this soprano, who would have turned 90 this week, ranks among the best of the best. (Google is going with Dec. 2, which explains its nice graphic today .) Callas worship is a cliche by now (Terrence McNally built a whole play, "The Lisbon Traviata," around it), but for those of us fully under the spell of "La Divina," there's nothing cheap or silly about it. We find in Callas an incredibly satisfying artistry that gets to the heart and soul of opera -- of music, period.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1997
As Joan Crawford in the movie "Mommie Dearest," Faye Dunaway raised a coat hanger in order to get her way. As Maria Callas in Terrence McNally's Tony Award-winning play "Master Class," Dunaway only has to raise her voice to an apprentice singer, and the nervous young vocalist is reduced to tears. Call her Diva Dearest.A star vehicle that suits the ultra-thin and still-beautiful Dunaway as well as the elegant black pantsuit she wears with such flair, "Master Class" also suits the Lyric Opera House.
NEWS
August 15, 1991
Callas Construction Co. has been awarded a $2.3 million contract to expand the Washington County Detention Center in Hagerstown to include a 70-bed minimum-security addition for prisoners with addictions.Gary Rohrer, chief of planning and codes administration for Washington County, said work should begin early next month and be completed late next year.The addition will house work-release inmates, weekend prisoners and substance abusers.Counseling and rehabilitation programs also will be based in the wing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 20, 1997
When playwright Terrence McNally won the 1996 Tony Award for "Master Class," he thanked the late opera singer Maria Callas "for bringing beauty and passion and integrity to my life." But "Master Class" wasn't the first time Callas figured prominently in a McNally play. More than a decade earlier, the playwright wrote "The Lisbon Traviata," a play named for one of Callas' pirated recordings.Now "The Lisbon Traviata" is receiving its belated Baltimore premiere at Everyman Theatre, where it opens tomorrow.
NEWS
January 8, 1992
Here's a novel way to save taxpayer money: make life easier for state legislators by chopping their annual session by one-third, from 90 days to 60 days. It would save at least $500,000 in costs and give lawmakers more time to work at real jobs in the world outside the State House.We suspect that this proposal, from two Western Maryland legislators, Peter G. Callas and George Edwards, won't make it through the General Assembly obstacle course. Their colleagues like the food and lodging allowances spread over 90 days.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
On March 9, 2003, DONALD WARFIELD of Richmond, VA formerly of Howard County, loving father of Betsy A. Callas and Albert H. Warfield. Mr. Warfield is also survived by five grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Friends are invited to attend a Memorial Service at the Slack Funeral Home, P.A. 3871 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City on Saturday, March 15, 2003 at 3 P.M. Interment private.
NEWS
By Dina ElBoghdady and Dunstan McNichol and Dina ElBoghdady and Dunstan McNichol,States News Service | September 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Tammy Callas of Laurel had her first run-in with product liability issues when she found that her Dow Corning breast implants were leaking chemicals into her body.The leaks caused Mrs. Callas, a mother of two, to develop rheumatoid arthritis, an eye and mouth disease called Sjodren, a thyroid condition, muscle weakness and memory loss, she said. To combat the illnesses, she must undergo chemotherapy for the rest of her life."We had a lot of big plans and dreams," said Mrs. Callas' husband, George.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 4, 2010
Of all the incisive moments in Terrence McNally's "Master Class," his Tony Award-winning tribute to the astonishing Maria Callas, the most compelling may be when "La Divina" - as her devoted fans called the soprano - mentions criticisms she received: "They said they didn't like my sound. But they didn't like my soul." When Tyne Daly delivers that line in the Kennedy Center's exhilarating new production of the play, you feel all the truth and pain behind it. By that point in "Master Class," it's kind of hard to remember that the real Callas isn't on the Eisenhower Theater stage revealing her inner self, so persuasively does Daly animate the character.
NEWS
March 26, 2006
On March 21, 2006, JAMES N. CALLAS; beloved husband of Aspassia (Skippie) Callas, loving father of Nicholas Callas and his wife Marlene, Adora Keil and her husband Christopher and Christina Flintoft and her husband Robert and the late Peter Callas; loving grandfather of Jennie and Christopher Callas and Theona and James Reynen; devoted brother of Helen Leonard and the late Anastasia and George Relatives and friends may call SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME OF...
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 26, 2006
There's this misconception about the guys of Calla. With their penchant for creeping, nocturnal sound- scapes and guitarist-lead singer Aurelio Valle's raspy, melancholic vocals, they give the impression that they're a dispirited, depressing group. They all just sit around long-faced, writing songs about how much love and life stink. Not true. "It's the way things come out," says Valle, who's calling from his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. "People interpret things differently, you know. But we don't consider ourselves a dark band.
NEWS
June 2, 2004
On Monday, May 31, 2004 MICHAEL GEORGE CALLAS, 83, of Hagerstown, MD, passed away in Norfolk General Hospital, Norfolk, VA. Born in Hagerstown, MD on Thursday, April 14, 1921, he was the son of the late George and Pella (Strataco) Callas. He was the widower of Betty (Kohler) Callas, who passed away in 1994. He was a 1939 graduate of Hagerstown High School and later graduated for Johns Hopkins University in 1943 with a degree in Civil Engineering. Following graduation from Johns Hopkins Mr. Callas entered the U.S. Army during World War II where served in the 29th Engineering Battalion serving in the Philippines, mapping invasions of the South Pacific Islands and Japan, at the conclusion of the war he returned to Johns Hopkins University where received his Master's degree in Structural Engineering in 1947.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
On March 9, 2003, DONALD WARFIELD of Richmond, VA formerly of Howard County, loving father of Betsy A. Callas and Albert H. Warfield. Mr. Warfield is also survived by five grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Friends are invited to attend a Memorial Service at the Slack Funeral Home, P.A. 3871 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City on Saturday, March 15, 2003 at 3 P.M. Interment private.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 11, 2002
The first time I heard the voice of Maria Callas, I laughed. The setting was a college professor's home. He had invited his music history class over one night so that we could all listen to a complete opera together. His choice was a recording of Rossini's defining comedy The Barber of Seville starring Callas as Rosina. No sooner did she start in on her first aria than I got the giggles. "It sounds like she has marbles in her mouth," I said, feeling quite the astute little critic. The teacher just gave me a pity-the-poor-rube smile and let the records play on. With the 25th anniversary of the soprano's death looming next month, I find it hard to believe I ever disliked, let alone giggled over, her incomparable, indelible singing.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | October 16, 1993
The Baltimore Opera Company opens its 1993-94 season tonight with a stunning new production of Donizetti's ''Lucia di Lammermoor,'' a tragic masterpiece filled with violent emotions -- love, hate, jealousy and madness of the most intense kind. For that very reason, perhaps, the opera was virtually forgotten for many years, a relic of early Romanticism overtaken by the more palpable horrors of the present century.''Lucia,'' first performed in 1835, offers the kind of perfervid melodramatic spectacle that English-speaking audiences, at least, once liked to think of as the peculiar amusement of overwrought Mediterranean sensibilities.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 20, 1997
Driven and manipulative Evelyn Mulwray in "Chinatown."Driven TV executive Diana Christensen in "Network."Driven and abusive Joan Crawford in "Mommie Dearest."For years Faye Dunaway has been fighting the pushy, larger-than-life stereotype, insisting she is not the roles she plays. But now that she's playing driven opera star Maria Callas, Dunaway embraces the comparison.Local theatergoers can see how well the role fits beginning Tuesday, when the touring production of "Master Class," Terrence McNally's play about Callas, opens at the Lyric Opera House.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Staff | July 22, 2001
Maria Callas: An Intimate Biography, by Anne Edwards. St. Martin's Press. 332 pages. $27.95. Maria Callas has become the Marilyn Monroe of the opera world. The soprano's darkly beautiful face is in itself an icon; her voice is more marketable than ever; the story of her brilliant career, tabloid-feeding love life and pathetic, premature death at 53 guarantees a constant stream of books about her. Last year, Greek Fire, the ambitious biography by investigative reporter Nicholas Gage, looked deeply into the soprano's affair with tycoon Aristotle Onassis and came up with a dead baby.
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