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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Working out of a Highlandtown studio, Ben Walsh and his small team of video game developers recently created My Pet Rock, a family-friendly Facebook game. But, Walsh said, some day he might decide to design a video game for a more, er, mature audience — and he's heartened to know the Supreme Court now has his back. In a landmark case, the high court on Monday struck down a California law barring the sale or rental of violent video games to minors. The 7-2 decision gave video games the same First Amendment protections afforded books, plays and movies.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Del. Jon Cardin wants to make "revenge porn" a felony that could result in a five-year prison term for posting compromising pictures of an ex-lover on the Internet The Baltimore County Democrat plans to release details of his new bill Wednesday. If approved, the proposal would place Maryland among a handful of states with tougher laws for jilted exes who distribute sexually explicit photos online without consent. While most states, including Maryland, already have laws on the books against cyber-harassment, only two - California and New Jersey - have enacted tougher standards that criminalize "revenge porn.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Dividing 5-4, the Supreme Court yesterday gave governments at all levels the authority to give out information from official files selectively, allowing groups to get the data only if they will use it in ways that officials approve.In the first significant ruling of the court's term, the justices split in reinstating a California law that permits police to release records of suspects' arrests, but only to groups that promise not to use the data for commercial purposes.The court in the past has ruled that the Constitution imposes no duty on the government to make public anything that is in official files.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 3, 2013
A health watchdog group is releasing a study today that found high levels of a cancer-causing chemical in Pepsi drinks in 10 states, including Maryland. The Center for Environmental Health commissioned Eurofins Analytical laboratory in Louisiana to analyze Coke and Pepsi products that were purchased from 10 states. The group said Coca-Cola and PepsiCo had pledged to change their products' caramel coloring as a result of a California law that requires labeling of products with cancer-causing ingredients.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Del. Jon Cardin wants to make "revenge porn" a felony that could result in a five-year prison term for posting compromising pictures of an ex-lover on the Internet The Baltimore County Democrat plans to release details of his new bill Wednesday. If approved, the proposal would place Maryland among a handful of states with tougher laws for jilted exes who distribute sexually explicit photos online without consent. While most states, including Maryland, already have laws on the books against cyber-harassment, only two - California and New Jersey - have enacted tougher standards that criminalize "revenge porn.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 18, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Reinforcing the right of all Americans to move to a new state, the Supreme Court struck down yesterday state laws that penalize people on welfare who exercise that right.It is unconstitutional, the court ruled by a 7-2 vote, for states to limit newcomers to the lower welfare benefits they had been collecting where they used to live."Citizens of the U.S., whether rich or poor, have the right to choose to be citizens of the state wherein they reside," a right that includes equal treatment in many state programs, Justice John Paul Stevens wrote for the court.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
Last spring, when Maryland legislators debated joining with California to toughen standards for vehicle emissions that contribute to global warming, automakers made it clear that they thought the state's legal footing was on shaky ground. Well, the terrain just got a lot firmer with a federal judge's decision Wednesday rejecting the industry's assertion that California standards are too tough and go beyond states' purview. The ruling by U.S. District Judge William Sessions III in Burlington, Vt., is welcome news for Maryland and the dozen other states that have emulated California's rules.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 3, 2013
A health watchdog group is releasing a study today that found high levels of a cancer-causing chemical in Pepsi drinks in 10 states, including Maryland. The Center for Environmental Health commissioned Eurofins Analytical laboratory in Louisiana to analyze Coke and Pepsi products that were purchased from 10 states. The group said Coca-Cola and PepsiCo had pledged to change their products' caramel coloring as a result of a California law that requires labeling of products with cancer-causing ingredients.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 13, 2003
LOS ANGELES - George Neville Rucker, an 82-year-old former Roman Catholic priest, was on a two-month cruise off the Aleutian Islands in Alaska, when, the authorities said, his past finally caught up with him. Alaska state troopers arrested him, harnessed him on a tugboat and returned him to Los Angeles, where he faced charges of molesting 12 girls - the youngest age 7 at the time - over 30 years, starting in 1946. If convicted, he faced a possible prison sentence of 26 years. But last Monday, before any evidence was presented to a jury, Rucker walked out of court a free man. He is among perhaps hundreds of people in California who are being freed from trial or jail as a result of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on June 26 that overturned a 1993 California law allowing charges against child molesters protected by a previous deadline on prosecutions.
NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Special to The Sun | November 24, 1991
SAN FRANCISCO -- From the instant the term-limit movement in California picked up momentum two years ago, state legislators were understandably nervous. Then came their disbelief when voters passed an initiative last year throwing out all 120 of them by the end of the decade and drastically cutting their operating budgets.Some legislators still clung to the hope of a legal reprieve. But last month the California Supreme Court upheld the law. Since then, the capital has been awash in a tide of anger and resentment.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 28, 2013
The Supreme Court's mixed bag of decisions in the session's final days, particularly on voting rights and same-sex marriage, seized the nation's headlines but did little to bolster its own clarity or credibility. Interested non-lawyers were left dependent on legal experts to sort out where this highest bench, with a general but not rigidly consistent conservative majority, comes down in today's cultural and political climate. Liberal defenders of the Voting Rights Act's preclearance monitoring of discriminatory practices in states, mostly in the Deep South, were jolted by the court's split decision to abandon the provision.
NEWS
February 7, 2012
The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding a lower court's ruling that California's Proposition 8, which outlawed gay marriage, was unconstitutional is surely a good outcome and an advance for equality. Already backers of same-sex marriage in Maryland, including Gov.Martin O'Malley, are expressing optimism that it will provide a boost to their efforts here. But the 2-1 opinion is so narrowly drawn that, even if it is upheld by theU.S. Supreme Court in an inevitable appeal, it may have little bearing on the situation in Maryland and elsewhere.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Working out of a Highlandtown studio, Ben Walsh and his small team of video game developers recently created My Pet Rock, a family-friendly Facebook game. But, Walsh said, some day he might decide to design a video game for a more, er, mature audience — and he's heartened to know the Supreme Court now has his back. In a landmark case, the high court on Monday struck down a California law barring the sale or rental of violent video games to minors. The 7-2 decision gave video games the same First Amendment protections afforded books, plays and movies.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
Supporters of the controversial new Maryland law to extend in-state tuition discounts to illegal immigrants cheered the Supreme Court's refusal Monday to take up a challenge to a similar law in California. Advocates for undocumented students in Maryland said the high court's action reinforced their position that the state was on solid legal footing when it approved the law, and suggested it would make it harder for opponents to challenge the measure in court. "Opponents for a long time painted this issue as unconstitutional and said that we were violating federal law," said state Sen. Victor Ramirez, the Prince George's County Democrat who sponsored the legislation.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
Last spring, when Maryland legislators debated joining with California to toughen standards for vehicle emissions that contribute to global warming, automakers made it clear that they thought the state's legal footing was on shaky ground. Well, the terrain just got a lot firmer with a federal judge's decision Wednesday rejecting the industry's assertion that California standards are too tough and go beyond states' purview. The ruling by U.S. District Judge William Sessions III in Burlington, Vt., is welcome news for Maryland and the dozen other states that have emulated California's rules.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Maryland legislators are expected to introduce legislation to protect personal information from identity fraud in response to the security breach at ChoicePoint Inc. in which thieves acquired data on thousands of consumers. The legislation could be introduced as early as today or tomorrow by Del. Brian R. Moe and Sen. Leonard H. Teitelbaum, who serve on the Joint Technology Oversight Committee, said Steve Sakamoto-Wengel, assistant attorney general in the Consumer Protection Division. Sakamoto-Wengel said yesterday that the legislation is modeled after a law in California, the only state that requires companies to notify consumers when personal data has been compromised.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Amy Oakes and Andrea F. Siegel and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2000
The city of Annapolis is asking the U.S. District Court to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland that challenges its newly enacted anti-loitering law. In motions and supporting papers mailed this week, the city also asked the court in Baltimore to remove the local NAACP chapter as a plaintiff -- an action that would leave three Annapolis residents in bringing the suit. The city passed the measure in October to curb open-air drug dealing, over claims by the ACLU that the law was vague, unconstitutional and gives police too much power.
NEWS
February 7, 2012
The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding a lower court's ruling that California's Proposition 8, which outlawed gay marriage, was unconstitutional is surely a good outcome and an advance for equality. Already backers of same-sex marriage in Maryland, including Gov.Martin O'Malley, are expressing optimism that it will provide a boost to their efforts here. But the 2-1 opinion is so narrowly drawn that, even if it is upheld by theU.S. Supreme Court in an inevitable appeal, it may have little bearing on the situation in Maryland and elsewhere.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 13, 2003
LOS ANGELES - George Neville Rucker, an 82-year-old former Roman Catholic priest, was on a two-month cruise off the Aleutian Islands in Alaska, when, the authorities said, his past finally caught up with him. Alaska state troopers arrested him, harnessed him on a tugboat and returned him to Los Angeles, where he faced charges of molesting 12 girls - the youngest age 7 at the time - over 30 years, starting in 1946. If convicted, he faced a possible prison sentence of 26 years. But last Monday, before any evidence was presented to a jury, Rucker walked out of court a free man. He is among perhaps hundreds of people in California who are being freed from trial or jail as a result of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on June 26 that overturned a 1993 California law allowing charges against child molesters protected by a previous deadline on prosecutions.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Amy Oakes and Andrea F. Siegel and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2000
The city of Annapolis is asking the U.S. District Court to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland that challenges its newly enacted anti-loitering law. In motions and supporting papers mailed this week, the city also asked the court in Baltimore to remove the local NAACP chapter as a plaintiff -- an action that would leave three Annapolis residents in bringing the suit. The city passed the measure in October to curb open-air drug dealing, over claims by the ACLU that the law was vague, unconstitutional and gives police too much power.
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